Results: Text (45) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 45 (2 pages)
    Page 1 of 2
Grace Jones

Shayla Corinne Black

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Born in 1948 in Spanish Town, Jamaica, Grace Jones’s whimsical career began as a model, where she was a brash addition to international designers Yves Saint Laurent, Claude Montana, and Kenzo Takada. Grace Jones obliterated all boundaries with her incorporation of gender-bending fashions, notorious buzz-cut hairstyle, and her determination to don original and outrageous styles. Artists like Lady Gaga, Nicki Minaj, and Rihanna have all paid homage to Jones for her exuberance and eccentricity, whic

Kate Moss

Karen de Perthuis

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Kate Moss is one of the world’s most photographed women, a blank slate for contemporary dreams and desires. With a career spanning three decades, she is a rare enduring phenomenon in an industry defined by ephemerality and a brutal quest for novelty. In the summer of 1988, she was fourteen when spotted by model agent Sarah Doukas at JFK airport—a bored teenager from the London suburb of Croydon with almond eyes, cupid-bow lips, and “God-given bone structure.” She would soon become a fashion model

Bianca Jagger

Jessica Draper

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1970s was a highly creative period in fashion, and one in which designers’ celebrity muses were prominent. Model and actress Bianca Jagger was a very fashionable friend to designers such as Yves Saint Laurent and Roy Halston, and became a particularly memorable icon of the 1970s, embodying the eclectic style that came to define the decade. Jagger referenced themes of exoticism, menswear, and the 1940s in her attention-grabbing wardrobe, which became a subject of particular press interest afte

Marilyn Monroe

Joanne B. Eicher

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Marilyn Monroe, born Norma Jeane Mortenson, sometimes using Baker (1 June 1926–5 August 1962), began her career as a model. Signing a film contract in 1946, she played minor roles, receiving attention for her beauty, curvaceous body, and mode of dressing. With prominence, she became a sex symbol. She adeptly helped create her visual persona by learning makeup and strategic wardrobe techniques. She relied on costumers like William Travilla to help construct her image in films like Gentlemen Prefer

Ethnicity and the Catwalk

Melissa Marra-Alvarez

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion models possess an enduring appeal that impacts on both the world of fashion and society in general. Consequently, the lack of diversity on the catwalk in recent years has come to the fore of popular conscience. Some fashion scholars have argued that modeling practices may serve to shape our understanding and ways of seeing identity, including those based on ethnicity. Focusing on the latter half of the twentieth century, the emergence of “ethnic” models in fashion is described, examining

Cher

Amanda M. B. Pajak

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Cher, born Cherilyn Sarkisian on 20 May 1946, is a singer-performer and actress active since the mid-1960s. Her career started as one-half of the folk-rock duo Sonny & Cher with her then husband, Sonny Bono (1935–1998). After gaining commercial success with their songs—the most impactful being “I Got You Babe” (1965)—the duo embraced the television media format with The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, which existed in multiple incarnations throughout the decade. It was during the airing of this televis

Grace Coddington

Katerina Pantelides

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article explores Grace Coddington’s role as a style icon throughout her careers of model, stylist, and creative director. Coddington was born in 1941 in Anglesey, Wales, and as a teenager, emulated Audrey Hepburn. In 1959 she moved to London to become a model and worked with youthful, avant-garde designers and photographers in the 1960s. Coddington’s signature style, her red mane and eclectic combination of vintage and modern pieces, emerged in the 1970s when she was a fashion editor at Brit

Linda Evangelista

Laura Peach

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Supermodel Linda Evangelista was one of the most-seen faces in fashion, gracing over 600 magazine covers. Born in Ontario, Canada, Evangelista began modeling as a teenager. In the 1980s, she began working with photographer Peter Lindbergh, and her relationship with him transformed her into a supermodel. Evangelista was most known for the short haircut that shot her modeling career into the stratosphere, launching her as a supermodel. Although many photographs of Evangelista in the 1990s show her

Helena Christensen

Laura Peach

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

As one of the main supermodels in the 1990s, Helena Christensen was frequently photographed for fashion magazines. Born to a Peruvian mother and Danish father, Christensen was raised in Denmark. Her modeling career began when she was a contestant in the Miss Universe beauty pageant in 1986. Shortly after, her modeling career took off in Paris. Although she frequently modeled highly stylized and ostentatious looks, Christensen’s personal style was one of bohemian chic, and off the runway she was s

Modeling History: How Models Have Changed Between the 1970s and 2000

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The role and significance of the fashion model has been subject to a series of profound changes since the professionalization of the occupation in the late nineteenth century. These variations have been catalyzed by a wide range of social, cultural, and creative influences, from shifting trends in photography and fashion and changing ideals of beauty and femininity to the advent of technology, the Internet, and social media. When Vogue launched in the United States in 1892, the magazine’s fashion

Creating Fashion on the Runway, Chinese Style

Jianhua Zhao

Source: The Chinese Fashion Industry. An Ethnographic Approach 2013

Book chapter

If the Chinese fashion industry is a puzzle, then China Fashion Week (CFW) is an occasion when all the pieces of the puzzle come together. During China Fashion Week, all the major players of the fashion field, including designers, models, members of the media, potential buyers, fashionistas, and students and scholars of fashion, gather together to display and witness the latest fashion trends. It is also an important social occasion for reunions and celebrations among friends and colleagues. Towa

Designers and Models Become Brands

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

In 1921, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel launched one of the most successful scents of all time (Groom 1997: 21). The iconic oblong bottle for Chanel No. 5, still revered, was carefully designed to her own very strict specifications, and she selected its contents from several versions created by parfumier Ernest Béaux (Charles-Roux 2009). Meanwhile, once established as a designer, she herself also became a fashion leader; she was constantly photographed and always mindful of publicity, whether it was in

Christian Dior: Nostalgia and the Economy of Feminine Beauty

Ilya Parkins

Source: Poiret, Dior and Schiaparelli. Fashion, Femininity and Modernity 2012

Book chapter

Dior’s initial stylistic ‘innovation’, though, had a complex temporal logic. As the strong reactions to it—both favourable and unfavourable—testified, it undeniably represented a return of a much older, if not precisely historically definable, silhouette. Its temporality was captured in an apparent contradiction: embraced as ‘revolutionary’, the New Look’s groundbreaking quality derived from its unabashed reclaiming of what might be read as a more conservative, older ideal of feminine beauty. Jus

Fashion Photography

Patrik Aspers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The production system behind fashion photography is a collaboration among many sectors in the fashion industry. A photographer takes fashion pictures, usually of models wearing clothes. Garment firms produce the clothes, which are intended to be worn by consumers. Present at the set—that is, the place where the pictures are taken—are often a makeup artist, a hairstylist, and a fashion stylist, all of whom may have assistants. The pictures will be processed and edited on a computer, and they will

Trendsetters

Laird Borrelli

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Early French Fashion Photography

Marie Botkin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The desire to represent nature as it was marked the advent of photography, with as much detail as the lens would permit. Photography in the early 1800s, as Frenchman Louis Daguerre developed it in the daguerreotype, used a technique that lent itself more to the creation of images resembling an eighteenth-century miniature than a photographic image in the twenty-first century. Daguerre did not envision his work in sun printing in the 1830s as a form of self-expression or as a way to circulate the

Jacques-Henri Lartigue

Marie Botkin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

See alsoEarly French Fashion Photography.

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

Cosmetics and Beauty Culture in Australia

Jennifer Craik

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cosmetics and beauty culture are forms of body modification that have a place in the language of all cultures of fashion and dress. Australia has both indigenous and European traditions of body modification and aesthetics. In precontact times indigenous traditions were centrally connected with ritualistic practices, but they were also about making the body attractive. After European settlement colonists largely followed the cosmetic practices and beauty cultures of Europe and America. Among Europ

Body and Dress

Angela Durante and Jenny Ellison

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

All human cultures engage in some form of dress and adornment. Although our bodies and the items we put on them might appear to be separate, they in fact have a great deal in common and are considerably intertwined. A dressed body represents a complex set of negotiations between an individual, the fashion system, and the social context in which they exist. Codes of dress set parameters but do not entirely determine how individuals dress. The body and dress are mutually constitutive—dress adds soc

Paris as a Fashion City

Martine Elzingre

Translated by Pierre Hodgson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Paris fashions—clothes, lingerie, accessories, and jewelry, together with other beauty products such as hairstyles, fragrances, and cosmetics—have come to dominate the world beyond the borders of France, as well as beyond Europe and indeed outside the West. In Paris itself, the two arts of dressing and seduction have thrived because innumerable ideas and techniques for applying those ideas have constantly been discovered—a continual process of experimentation.

Fashion Models

Caroline Evans

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Charles Frederick Worth is generally thought to be the first couturier to use live models. However, many nineteenth-century dressmakers had a young woman available to put on a dress for a client, although their primary mode of display was a wooden or wicker dummy. Indeed, Worth met his future wife, Marie, while she was employed to model shawls to customers on the shop floor of their mutual employer, the mercer Gagelin et Opigez. The couple set up their first maison de couture in 1858, and Marie m

Explore
Display Mannequins

Leopoldina Fortunati

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although the dress mannequin is usually considered marginal within the marketing and displaying of fashionable clothing, it can be analyzed as a key cultural artifact in the fashion system. The display mannequin is part of an archaic imagery of humankind, similar to automatons, robots, and dolls. At a metaphoric level, it has an importance in Western culture, because on a symbolic plane the mannequin replaces the human being. In fashion, the mannequin engages in the dialogue between the container

Twiggy

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Actors and Actresses, Impact on Fashion

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Explore
Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 45 (2 pages)
Page 1 of 2