Results: Text (76) Images (0)

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 76 (4 pages)
    Page 1 of 4
Context

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Pattern cutting computers in,Deconstruction,Blocks,Pattern, defined,A pattern can be described as a two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional object. In clothing, this would usually take the form of a front and back set of pattern shapes that, when cut in cloth and made up, form the garment. There are many ways to create a pattern, but the conventional way would be to use a set of blocks of a specific size to represent fundamental shapes and sections of the body (such as the bodice, s

Pattern Fundamentals

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Darts,Blocks,skirt,Blocks,Measurements from the body are used to create flat 2D templates called blocks. These represent the body shape in its simplest form. These blocks are referred to as basic blocks because more developed shapes created by designers and manufacturers can be created over time, and successful shapes can become blocks from which seasonal collections can be developed.

Shape

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Darts,in design,Fashion design is design for the body. The body will carry the design, and the garment will reveal the curves of the body or use the body to support its structure.

Sleeves, Collars and Circles

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collar Eton,fundamentals,With a unique sleeve design, and no other design features, a garment can look extraordinary. Sleeves are an important part of pattern cutting; the pattern cutter must be sensitive to this – after all, the exact length and angle of a shoulder line could be critical to the designer's ‘handwriting’ of the season. A pattern cutter must also consider the best type, shape and fit of sleeve to express the design. There is a distinct relationship between shoulder and sleeve, and

Trousers

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collar Eton,fundamentals,The idea that women were once ‘not allowed’ to wear trousers seems ridiculous now. Although women began to wear trousers early on in the twentieth century, it was really Yves Saint Laurent who made trousers chic and highly fashionable, along with his reworking of ‘the smoking jacket’. Trousers were the domain of male attire as much as skirts were the domain of female attire. In particular, this gendering of clothing was somewhat erased when jeans were adopted by men and w

Pockets, Openings and Finishes

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The way a garment is finished is determined by price, fabric and design, so, for example, if a facing was used, it would give a crisp clean finish without the need for topstitching, but a design in fabric, such as fine silk, chiffon or cotton, may be better finished with a bias fabric binding.

Sustainability and Fashion

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Waste,Consumption,We presently face much debate about the depletion of the earth's resources and issues such as ‘peak oil’ and the consequences of global warming. Whatever the truth, we cannot blindly continue without considering ways to minimize the impact we are making on the earth.

Getting Started

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Working with the right tools will make block and pattern construction easier. These are just some of the key pieces of equipment required.

Pattern Cutting

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This is the point at which pattern cutting becomes much more creative and exciting. Once the design has been completed, the process of breathing life into a flat design drawing in order to achieve an actual garment can begin. To be able to achieve a beautiful garment shape takes time and experience. Remember, nothing ever happens without practicing your skills—don’t be disheartened if it doesn’t work first time round. All outstanding fashion designers and creative pattern cutters have worked for

Laying Out, Cutting, and Stitching Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

An L-square ruler and a tape measure are required tools you need for laying out and cutting knits. The remaining tools you need are as follows (see also Figure 4.1):

Pattern cutting as a fashion design tool

Timo Rissanen and Holly McQuillan (eds)

Source: Zero Waste Fashion Design, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Pattern cutting is traditionally written about and taught as a specialist technique, performed by someone in a discrete role. It is treated as distinct from fashion design, and often pattern cutters are not involved in the design of the garment. They may not even be in the same location as the designer, placing constraints on collaboration. While the pattern cutter might have some sense of the amount of fabric waste that a single garment creates, she/he usually does not see the amount of waste cr

Production

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Depending on the size of the company, a product manager, or product design manager, may be responsible for all of the products within a company’s product line in a small firm, or for a specific product category in a line for a large company. Product managers often work with one foot in the creative part of the business and the other foot in the production part of the business. On the creative, design-focused side, product managers monitor market and fashion trends related to their assigned produc

Designing Apparel and Accessories for the Manufacturer

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Working as a fashion designer, an artist dedicated to the creation of apparel and accessories, can mean supervising a team of design assistants, working under the label of a big-name designer or manufacturer, freelancing for a line or group of lines, or designing and producing a line under your own name. Although the first two options may not appear to be as alluring as the others, they may be less stressful and, quite possibly, more lucrative. Designing and manufacturing your own label takes a g

Zero Waste Fashion Design

Timo Rissanen

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

TIMO RISSANEN is a fashion designer and academic whose design practice and research are deeply immersed in sustainability. His PhD focused on zero waste fashion design. He is the Assistant Professor of Fashion Design and Sustainability at Parsons The New School for Design, and Program Director for AAS Fashion Design and AAS Fashion Marketing.

Alexander McQueen

Aimee Scott

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Introduction to Patternmaking

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A “body type” is the relationship of human body shape to body size. Every physical characteristic in a person’s physique can be a determining factor of his or her body type, whether it is height, weight, or lower- to upper-body ratio, as well as the body weight appearance for individual body parts such as the shoulders, chest, and abdomen.

Basic Slopers for Wovens Slim-Fit Style versus Classic-Fit Style

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

For functional dress in contemporary daily life, most consumers pick their favorite clothes from ready-to-wear fashions. This departure from the European tradition of couture has occurred because production of an individual order requires a lot of time and money. Every piece of clothing requires a process to convert rectangular fabric into a form useful for human needs. Flat patternmaking is one of the ways to achieve this conversion.

Necklines

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The inset band sets the neckline. It is composed of two layers of fabric (not facing) and can vary in shape and width according to the garment design. The following are three examples of inset band necklines. One of them is for woven fabrics, and the others are for knit fabrics. Drafting this neckline for woven fabrics is simple, because the band is the same shape as the neckline and can be traced from the pattern. However, for knit fabrics, there are extra measuring and drafting steps.

Collars

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Every type of collar (except the standing collar) has three structures: the sewing line, the collar roll line, and the collar edge (see Figure 4.1).

Sleeves and Cuffs

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The sleeve was developed out of necessity as well as beauty. Primary functions of arms in the human body are balance and lifting, and it is necessary that the design of the garment that covers the arms be supportive of this purpose. The types of sleeves vary depending on their length, their components, and the methods by which they are constructed.

Plackets and Pockets

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A placket is an opening that enables the wearer to put on and take off garments. They are most common on the upper part of pants, and the necks and sleeves of shirts and casual jackets. Even though the primary purpose of plackets is to allow clothing to be put on or removed easily, sometimes they are used as a design element. Plackets often contain added facings, attached bands to surround and reinforce fasteners such as zippers, snaps, and buttons, and are often found on the double layers of fab

Details

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Buttons, like snaps, hooks, and zippers, are mechanisms used to close garments. Buttons are often used as decorative elements, and their size and shape vary from round to rectangular, and lat to dimensional. Placement of buttons can vary according to design intent. They can also be a single button or double button.

Shirts

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The convertible collar and continuous placket of this design also appear in the short-sleeved bowling or Hawaiian shirt. Its classic silhouette includes enough wearing ease to go over the trousers, because it is typically worn untucked.

Pants

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Casual Jackets

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 76 (4 pages)
Page 1 of 4