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The Dress Form, Tools, and Terminology

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress formmanufacturers/suppliersDress formarms forArm, dress formIn draping, the dress form is used to manipulate flat fabric to fit the curves of the body accurately. It is used to visualize what a pattern should look like in relationship to the figure. Fabric is prepared, cut, pinned, and contoured to the dress form’s shape to achieve a desired pattern. Usually the Grain crosswiselengthwiseLengthwise grainlengthwise Crossgrain/crosswise grainGrain crosswisegrain of the fabric hangs vertical to

Selecting Vendors and Building Partnerships

Richard Clodfelter

Source: Retail Buying. From Basics to Fashion, 6th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

wholesalers,vendors,wholesalers,vendors,manufacturers,middleman,intermediaries,buying offices,types of,For some product categories, you must not only choose from many different vendors, but you must also decide whether to purchase directly from the producer or from a middleman, an intermediary between the buyer and seller. Again, careful analysis should allow you to choose the one that best meets your needs. Vendors are typically classified as (1) manufacturers, (2) wholesalers, (3) manufacturers

Internationalization of Retailing

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

Men's Apparel

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The oldest of the domestic apparel industries, the menswear industry gave birth to the women's and children's wear industries. It got its start in the late 1700s. Prior to that, the rich patronized tailor Slop shops,shops, where their clothing was custom-made or fitted to them. Everyone else wore homemade clothing.

The Business of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashion is a business, affected by the same technological advances, investment patterns, and economic forces that affect other major businesses in the world. Fashion is not just limited to apparel, and it impacts our complete lifestyle as well as the products that we buy. Fashion influences the automobile, housing, and entertainment industries, and like these industries, it is shaped by the basic principles of business and economics.

Ten: Quality, In the Nick of Time: Shinola

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A 2014 Economist article titled “Mo’ time for Motown” lightheartedly related the history of Shinola. Tom Kartsotis, the founder of Bedrock Manufacturing (named for the famous Flintstone’s cartoon’s home-town), bought the name for the company from a longtime brand of shoe polish (founded in 1907) that was best known for the slogan “You can’t tell shit from Shinola.” This was absolute perfection for Kartsotis, who believes that this company can someday become the largest manufacturer of high-qualit

Sourcing

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

How do design companies locate the fabrics and other product parts necessary for producing their lines? Some career options focus on sourcing fabrics and other product components. Fashion production planners, piece goods buyers, and findings buyers are three examples of these career paths. Sourcing can encompass buying goods domestically and abroad. If products are purchased from an overseas vendor and shipped to the United States, then they are referred to as imports. In contrast, products that

Designing Apparel and Accessories for the Manufacturer

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Working as a fashion designer, an artist dedicated to the creation of apparel and accessories, can mean supervising a team of design assistants, working under the label of a big-name designer or manufacturer, freelancing for a line or group of lines, or designing and producing a line under your own name. Although the first two options may not appear to be as alluring as the others, they may be less stressful and, quite possibly, more lucrative. Designing and manufacturing your own label takes a g

Product Development by the Manufacturer and Retailer

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Manufacturers that offer product development to retailers provide innovation, flexibility, and cost control for retailers. Many are responsible for a traditional manufacturer’s tasks, such as bringing innovative fabrics to the retailer or producing garments from a product sample; however, others may be expected to work closely with the retailer’s strategic plans to build products that are best suited for creating customer/brand familiarity—from start to finish. Some product development teams empl

Promotion for the Designer and Manufacturer

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

What is the difference between consumer and trade publications? A consumer publication is readily available to the layperson, the general customer. The consumer may subscribe to the periodical, online or in print, or purchase it at a store. Nearly all consumer lifestyle publications feature some type of fashion content (e.g., People, Town & Country, and Travel ); some are devoted exclusively to fashion and interior design. Examples of fashion consumer publications include Vogue, In Style, House &

Visual Merchandising, Retail Design, and Interior Design

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Just as a Web developer builds a virtual business, the architect builds the brick-and-mortar business. The architect is a building designer who may work with a wide variety of structures. Those who specialize in serving retail clients have opportunities for projects ranging from small freestanding retail stores to large malls. These types of business locations are referred to as commercial real estate. Architecture is the creative blend of art and science in the design of environments for people.

Modern Merchandising

Jeremy A. Rosenau and David L. Wilson

Source: Apparel Merchandising. The Line Starts Here, 3rd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Today’s apparel merchandisers must be constantly aware of subtle changes occurring in their target market and be acutely sensitive to the market environment. Societal changes, work ethics, leisure activities, music, movies, the arts, physical fitness, vacation choices, eating trends, attitudes, philosophies of life, geopolitics, reading habits, language, the global economy, and even climate changes all have an effect on fashion preferences. The merchandiser must be able to tune in to all these fa

Chapter eighteen: Fashion Forecasting for Designers and Manufacturers

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion is born by small facts, trends, or even politics, never by trying to make little pleats, by trinkets, by clothes easy to copy, or by the shortening or lengthening of a skirt.

Chapter twenty-one: Outsourcing Fashion Design, Production, and Management

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

One of the greatest victories you can gain over someone is to beat him with politeness.

Ukrainian Fashion, the 1940s to 1990s

Tetiana Bobchenko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Following the end of World War II, everyday life returned to normal very slowly in Soviet Ukraine. The opening of the Kyiv (the post-Soviet Ukrainian spelling of Kiev) House of Fashion in 1944 was one of the first so-called peacetime miracles. In the beginning, it was just a small workshop, and its staff brought their own irons and sewing machines. A few decades later, it employed five hundred college-educated designers, cutters, tailors, and embroidery artists and occupied a seven-story building

Soviet Underwear

Julia Demidenko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Soviet-era underwear—both its manufacturing and consumption—were determined not only by fashion but also, to a great extent, by the ideology and political goals of the state and its economic priorities at different stages. As a result of the revolution of February 1917, underwear became simpler, and its assortment was reduced. Due to the devastation that followed the October Revolution of 1917 and the civil war, people continued to wear prerevolutionary styles of underwear.

Textile and Apparel Industries at the Turn of the Millennium

Kitty G. Dickerson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Behind the runway shows and other glitz and glamour of the fashion industry are the textile and apparel firms that churn out the garments and other textile products for U.S. consumers. These are companies that have to deal with serious realities of profit and survival in an intensely competitive environment. Just as fashions are transformed over the years with hemlines that rise and fall and silhouettes that change, the industries and companies that produce the fashions have been completely trans

Manufactured Cellulosic And Regenerated Protein Fibers

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Manufactured cellulosic and regenerated protein fibers are created from materials that cannot be used for fibers in their original state. For example, cotton linters cannot be spun into cotton, but they can be used to create regenerated cellulosic fibers. Often, but not always, the characteristics of the regenerated fibers are similar to those of the natural fibers. Rayon, a regenerated cellulosic, has some characteristics that are very similar to those of cotton. Regenerated protein fibers are c

Yarn Formation

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) defines a yarn as a continuous strand of textile fibers, filaments, or materials in a form that can be used to make fabric. Fiber properties can be enhanced or modified by the way the fibers are made into yarns. Some fibers need extensive processing to become yarns, while others, such as monofilaments, need very little processing. The resulting yarns are used to make knitted or woven fabrics. Felt and nonwoven fabrics lack yarn structure and go di

Patterns and Pattern Making

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In the United States, Godey’s sold full-scale patterns by Mme Demorest through mail order in 1854. Frank Leslie’s Gazette of Fashions included full-scale, foldout Demorest patterns in the monthly periodical as well as offering patterns by mail. The patterns were one size only. Because they were offered through retail or mail order, Demorest patterns were the first commercial patterns in the United States (Emery, p. 1999). They offered a wide range of ladies, children’s, and men’s tissue-paper pat

Hoyningen-Huene, George

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Ionic columns rose alongside factory smoke-stacks, Greek temples alongside railroad tunnels and depots & and the ladies and gentlemen of Paris, London, New York and Biarritz enjoyed the sunshine among pedestals from which the gods of ancient Greece looked down in naked silence, between snorting stallions and muscular heroes.

North American Silk Industry

Jacqueline Field

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

By the early twentieth century, the U.S. silk industry was the largest in the world. It transformed silk, a historically scarce and expensive luxury, into a widely available and affordable fabric. Silk materials filtered into almost every kind of female dress, many articles of male dress, and all sorts of trimmings and accessories. An array of different silks—plain, patterned, colorful, lustrous, soft, rustling, light, heavy—to one degree or another brought the visual aesthetic and sensuous pleas

Production

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Intern, 2nd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A flowchart of the production or manufacturing process as it relates to the various sectors of the fashion industry is shown as Figure 11.2. Next is an examination of the actual manufacturing steps, from development of the production pattern to distribution of the finished product. At the end of this chapter, costing activities for the various steps are presented.

Soviet State Cosmetic Company TEZHE in the 1930s

Jukka Gronow

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Soviet culture of cosmetics was born in the middle of the 1930s. A major reorientation took place in the cultural policy of the USSR that had a direct impact on the consumption habits of Soviet citizens. This turn coincided with the final consolidation of Stalin’s power in the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Stalin’s slogan from the year 1936, “life has become better, life has become more joyous, comrades,” summarized this new cultural mood. It formed a sharp contrast to the previous off

Czech Urban Dress, 1948 to Twenty-First Century

Konstantina Hlaváková

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

After the Communists seized power in Czechoslovakia in 1948, political change affected all areas of social life. The Communist regime considered fashion and styles of dress as effective ideological instruments through which it could exercise its control of society. The nationalization and liquidation of prospering small firms and the destruction of a network of services that had grown up over decades on the basis of natural need caused immediate economic problems. The new production structure and

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