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Walter Van Beirendonck

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Charles James

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

Dress, Self-Fashioning and Display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Christine Guth

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Isabella Stewart Gardner negotiated a prominent public position for herself in Boston through the establishment of a museum that promoted a different attitude towards art than those founded with the aim of educating the public. She assembled her collection as an individual, producing a competing, but equally ideologically motivated account of what she regarded as art. Her collection embraced the cultures of Europe and Asia, but also gave recognition to products of female craft such as lace. While

All Out in the Wash: Convict Stain Removal in the Narryna Heritage Museum’s Dress Collection

Jennifer Clynk and Sharon Peoples

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This study extends historian Stefan Petrow’s 2009 study of the convict stain and Narryna by suggesting ways in which its effects can be overcome or reinterpreted, especially in relation to dress. The metaphor of the convict stain relates to a social stigma dating from the 1840s, when anti-transportationists in VDL began a fierce political and moral campaign against convict transportation to the colony. The stain metaphor was a nineteenth-century term applied by historians from the 1850s through t

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Kosuke Tsumura

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

‘Look At Me I’M Different!’: Identity Art And The Expectations Of Race

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

National identification is an exemplary case of how an external border is reflected into an internal limit. Of course, the first step towards the identity of the nation is defined through differences from other nations, via an external border: if I identify myself as an Englishman, I distinguish myself from the French, German, Scots, Irish, and so on. However, in the next stage, the question is raised of who among the English are ‘the real English’, the paradigm of Englishness; who are the Englis

Minimalism: Donald Judd Or Ikea?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Minimalist artists constructed simple, monochromatic, geometric objects of formal symmetry, characterized by an absence of traditional composition. Minimalism was an extreme abstract art, not imitative but solipsistic, self-referential: it was unto itself, harking back to the idea of truth to materials whose lineage can be located in the Russian Constructivists (particularly Rodchenko, AleksandrRodchenko and El Lissitzky) through to Moore, HenryMoore, Hepworth, BarbaraHepworth, Gabo, NoamGabo, Pe

Inside-Out: Outsider Artists Go Inside

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

The term ‘Outsider Art’ was coined in 1972 (a year after the ‘birth’ of Contemporary Aboriginal, Aboriginal artAboriginal art) by the English art critic Roger Cardinal, RogerCardinal as an umbrella term to describe the art produced by those not associated with, admitted to or educated by the art scene, denoting usually the insane, but also the parochial ingenue. ‘Outsider Art’ also incorporates the ‘Art BrutArt Brut’ of French postwar artist Jean Dubuffet, JeanDubuffet, and folk art as part of it

Conclusion: Fashionable Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Margaret Howell

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Pam Hogg

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Bella Freud

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Louis Vuitton (house)

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Fashion 1970s–2000s

Colleen Hill

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In London, the Victoria and Albert Museum’s 1971 exhibition “Fashion: An Anthology by Cecil Beaton” attracted more than 90,000 visitors, making it one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history. While Beaton acquired examples of historical dress from some of Britain’s most fashionable women, he placed particular emphasis on recent fashion—a largely unprecedented idea. Also important was the exhibition’s experimental installation, created in part by professional store window dressers

Investing (in) Time: Collecting and Consuming the Past

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

In Germany, markets for used goods, including clothes, have a long history, yet their patronage from consumers who do not rely on them out of economic necessity emerges, as in other European countries, more widely in the 1970s. Volker Fischer, VolkerFischer’s 1980 book on the “nostalgia market” in Germany provides a comprehensive overview of the development of the trade, and the shift in value of old things in the context of the 1970s, when there is surplussurplus in goods and also (compared to t

Wendy Dagworthy

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sonia Rykiel

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Etro

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sarah Burton

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Salvador Dalí

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Mystifying, intriguing, thought-provoking: the layered work of the Spanish artist Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) appeared across painting, drawing, film, and sculpture. He is best known for his involvement in the artistic and literary movement of surrealism, which explored the unconscious. However, Dalí’s increasingly commercial endeavors and lifelong interest in dress led him to become hugely influential in fashion, from his meticulously flamboyant self-presentation to his collaborations with couturi

‘At Once Classical and Modern’: Raymond Duncan Dress and Textiles in the Royal Ontario Museum

Alexandra Palmer

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

I first learned about Raymond Duncan from a lecture on men in togas given by Lou Taylor in the mid-1980s. She showed an astonishing image from the turn of the century of a man walking along the banks of the Seine wearing a draped toga, sandals and pushing an enormous black perambulator. I was flabbergasted, not only by his appearance, but also by the fact that I had not heard nor read about such a colourful character during my years studying art, fashion and textile history. Since seeing his text

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