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Anna Wintour

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Regarded as one of the industry’s most powerful figures, Anna Wintour is not simply an arbiter of fashion, but also a style setter in her own right. As editor in chief of Vogue, Wintour establishes trends and anoints the latest talent, but as a fashion icon, her style is tailored to perfection, tried and true. Though Anna Wintour’s style legacy is still very much in the making, her position as a fashion icon has undoubtedly been established. Countless designers not only cite her as a muse, but th

André Leon Talley

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

At 6 ft. 6 in. (198 cm) tall and with a thirty-year tenure at Vogue, André Leon Talley is certainly one of fashion’s most imposing figures. An authority on fashion history, Talley’s expertise has been a crucial aspect of his work and has also deeply informed his own personal style. As designer Tom Ford observed, “He is one of the last great fashion editors who has an incredible sense of fashion history. He can see through everything you do to the original reference and predict what was on your in

Grace Coddington

Katerina Pantelides

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article explores Grace Coddington’s role as a style icon throughout her careers of model, stylist, and creative director. Coddington was born in 1941 in Anglesey, Wales, and as a teenager, emulated Audrey Hepburn. In 1959 she moved to London to become a model and worked with youthful, avant-garde designers and photographers in the 1960s. Coddington’s signature style, her red mane and eclectic combination of vintage and modern pieces, emerged in the 1970s when she was a fashion editor at Brit

Anna Piaggi

Victoria Rose Pass

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From the 1970s until her death in 2012, Anna Piaggi was one of the most recognizable fashion editors in the world. With her shock of bright blue hair, often topped with a doll’s hat worn at a rakish angle, and her penchant for exaggerated—almost clown-like—makeup, Piaggi delighted in dressing with irreverence. She freely combined vintage and contemporary fashion as well as high and low. Born in Milan in 1931, Piaggi began freelancing for Vogue in the 1970s, and in 1988 was hired as a creative con

‘Fashion Films’: From Prêt-à-Porter to A Single Man

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

–Hugo Grumbar, head of Icon Distribution in the United Kingdom (Clark 2010: 9)Tom Ford has a huge loyal following. Any Vogue reader, GQ, Elle, Vanity Fair … they all know who he is, and there’s always hot anticipation for the next thing he does. I thought he was very marketable.

The Changing Face(s) of the Fashion Magazine and the New Media Landscape

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Magazines directed at women alone first appeared in the eighteenth century: the purveying of information about the latest fashions was part of their remit, but they had other tasks to perform. The earliest magazines on both sides of the Atlantic were serious publications, often with an educational element (Ferguson 1983; Gough-Yates 2003). Nevertheless, they always contained line drawings and perhaps coloured plates of the latest fashions from Paris. The idea that the function of the magazine inc

Fashion Editors

Lenore Benson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Explore
Fashion Journalism

Kate Nelson Best

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion journalism embraces all kinds of media commentary, but primarily newspaper and magazine articles, about the fashion industry, those who populate the fashion world, and fashion itself. As such, it has commercial, ideological, and symbolic functions that have remained unchanged since the mid-1800s.

Vreeland, Diana

Michelle Tolini Finamore

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Vreelands moved back to New York in 1935. Diana began her first job in fashion editorial work at Harper’s Bazaar in 1937. She was promoted to the position of fashion editor in 1939, working under editor-in-chief Carmel Snow, and remained at the magazine until 1962. Vreeland first came to the readership’s attention with her 1936 column entitled “Why Don’t You?” The feature encapsulated her personal belief in the ability of fashion to transform women by offering such extravagant and fantastic s

Fashion Magazines

Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion magazines are both cultural products and commodities. As cultural products, they circulate in a cultural economy of collective meanings. They provide how-to recipes, illustrated stories, narratives, and experiential and behavioral models—particularly in the realms of fashion and beauty—in which the reader’s ideal self is reflected and on which she can herself reflect and act. As commodities, fashion magazines are products of the publishing and print industries and important sites for the

Production, Gatekeeping and Diffusion of Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Fashion-ology. An Introduction to Fashion Studies 2005

Book chapter

Diffusion theories of fashion seek to explain how fashion is spread through interpersonal communication and institutional networks, and they assume that the fashion phenomenon is not ambiguous nor unpredictable. As Horn and Gurel explain: When clothing behavior is expressed in fashion, the behavior is still regular and predictable. Fashions in any area of life, especially fashions in clothing, are not random and purposeless. They reflect the cultural patterns of the times. Fashions follow a prog

Issue 1

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

On the argument that, in this late-summer hiatus between years, it is not plain what the new or ‘latest’ fashion is going to be, Madame de Ponty chooses for her first article a permanent and unchanging topic, jewellery.

Issue 2

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

Ix’s approach to his lady-readers, as we see, is highly insidious. He keeps encouraging them in a ferocious snobbery and chauvinism, until it dawns on us that his cruel mockery of the foreign tourists can be read, equally well or better, as mockery of the Parisians, vainly pluming themselves on their high culture and esprit and the supremacy of their city. (For after all, according to the logic of the argument, they have not actually seen these foreign invaders, they are merely imagining them.) I

Issue 3

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

For Ix, Issue 3 is an occasion to express his real preferences and his strongest dislikes in the theatre, without too much concealment. What his readers would be supposed to make of this is a question one keeps asking oneself. Though he detests vaudeville and its ‘Poverty-stricken language’, Ix manages, as we see, to pay a most handsome and fanciful compliment to the celebrated Pauline Virginie Déjazet (1797-1875), queen of the vaudeville theatre for fifty years. Déjazet specialised in ‘breeches’

Issue 4

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

After the amusements of transvestism, Mme de Ponty comes to the attractions of narcissism. ‘Madame, with such-and such a toilette you could well stay at home, saved from the tedium of the passing hours by this silk or that lace, enchanted and as it were made new to yourself.’ Ix has already broached the same topic, though less drastically, in Issue 1: ‘For, indeed, what does it signify, Madame, that in your salon, the scene of your triumphs, the pier-glass is carved with a tragic or comic mask, a

Issue 5

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

Miss Satin, appropriately, devotes her column in this issue to her compatriot, the great Charles Frederick Worth (1825–95), who, ‘alone, has the art of creating a toilette as elusive as our own thoughts’. Worth was born in Lincolnshire and trained in Swan and Edgar’s store in London, then in 1845 went to Paris, and twelve years later he set up an independent business as a dressmaker, attracting the patronage of the Empress Eugénie and coming more or less to dominate the Parisian world of fashion.

Issue 6

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

Ix at last keeps his promise to write about Books, and to very odd effect. There is a species of calculated absurdity in his lavish praise of the poetry of Théodore de Banville and Emmanuel des Essarts, and it is not too plain what the point of the game is. Certainly, Mallarmé himself, though he was extremely fond of des Essarts as a person, detested his writing (though, out of loyalty, he included a poem by him, ‘Le Veilleur de nuit’, in Issue 5). He writes to Eugène Lefébure on 18 February 1865

Issue 7

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

Ix devotes his column in this issue to a sore subject, already hinted at in his earlier causeries and theatre reports. It is that music (that ‘adorable scourge’) is taking over all the Paris theatres, at the expense of poetry and the spoken word. It is sometimes said that the huge success of the operetta La Fille de madame Angot, with a score by Lecocq, was the first real proof of Paris’s resurrection after the events of 1870–1. It had many imitators; and by November 1874 Lecocq himself had two m

Issue 8

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

Within Ix’s conception of Fashion, as we have noticed already, the calendar plays an important part, and his advice for an old-fashioned Christmas and New Year is warmly affectionate. The enthusiasm extends to the ‘Golden Notebook’s’ instructions for ‘An ordinary Christmas tree’ and is evidently Mallarmé’s own. Ix’s fondness for ‘glacé fruits from all lands’ and ‘traditional sweets … imitating the shape of some ordinary or fantastic thing’ remind one of the inventive quatrains Mallarmé would comp

Part I: La Derniére Mode, and its Pre-history

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

People today say: Napoleon AND Stendhal.

The Global Diffusion Mechanism of French Fashion: Past and Present

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Dress, Body, Culture 2004

Book chapter

One’s good reputation is the measure of talent and creativity. In order to create that reputation or prestige, the works must first be exposed for evaluation and then go through a system of validation although consequences are not always positive. Without reputation, it is difficult to prove one’s design skills. Perrot (1994: 40) explains the importance of the designer’s reputation in the nineteeth century: Talent was a pretty slim asset unless it was associated with a reputation, a name at first

Tailoring the Nation: Fashion Writing in Nineteenth-Century Argentina

Regina A. Root

Source: Fashioning the Body Politic. Dress, Gender, Citizenship 2002

Book chapter

In The Empire of Fashion, Gilles Lipovetsky (1994) pursues the evolution of modern democracy through the history of dress. He traces the rise of nationalist sentiments to the creation of national forms of dress in Europe of the Middle Ages. Fashion, he argues, ‘helped reinforce the awareness of belonging to a single political and cultural community.’ He continues: As a collective constraint, fashion actually left individuals with relative autonomy in matters of appearance; it instituted an unprec

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