Results: Text (23) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 23 of 23 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Shifts and Balances: 1900–1920s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

A dynamic new figure entered the pattern enterprise in the first decade of the new century. Condé Nast was adept at promotion and was attracted to the pattern industry. He organized the Home Pattern Company and distributed dress patterns in an arrangement with Ladies’ Home Journal in 1905 (Seebohm 1982: 32). The Ladies’ Home Journal was an influential women’s periodical with a circulation of 1,000,000 (Mott 1938: vol. 4, 545). Nast had remarkable marketing skills and successfully promoted pattern

Home Front Clothing Initiatives

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

Seamstresses

Barbara Burman

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

“Riding an omnibus through & [London’s commercial districts] at the turn of the century, one could hardly avoid noticing gaunt and harried women and children scurrying through the streets & carrying heavy bundles & passing along from workroom to workroom the shirts, suits, blouses, ties and shoes that soon would dress much of the world.” (Schmiechen, p. 1)

Ireland

Síle de Cléir

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The situation regarding the various types of dress in Ireland in the period between the beginning of the nineteenth and the end of the twentieth centuries is a complex one. It is useful, perhaps, in this context to see dress in Ireland at this time as a continuum: folk dress at one end, characterized by locally produced fabrics and traditional aesthetics and deeply embedded in a local social and cultural context; and fashionable dress at the other, with a wider choice of materials and styles conn

Settler Dress in Australia

Damayanthie Eluwawalage

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing was a problematic aspect of the social and cultural life of colonial Australia from the time of first settlement in 1788. Apart from military officers and civil officials, much everyday clothing was working-class wear. Yet fashionable dress was soon to become a key aspect of cultural practice, emphasizing the social status and power of the elite and aspirational elite, as well as being a symbolic indicator of class. Status signals were important in this fledgling society made up of dispa

Finland

Bo Lönnqvist

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Early nineteenth-century Finnish fashion was influenced by Stockholm, capital of Finland and Sweden since the thirteenth century. In the 1790s the Finnish upper classes wore styles influenced by rococo and neoclassicism, known as Gustavian after Gustavus III of Sweden. After the war of 1808–1809 Finland was separated from Sweden and annexed to the Russian Empire as a grand duchy until Finnish independence in 1917. A new bourgeois class developed. Male dress lost its extravagance, symbolizing bure

Italy

Elisabetta Merlo and Francesca Polese

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

If we use the expression Italian fashion to indicate the production of garments and accessories that are marked by distinctive and unique features universally associated with Italian culture and identity, then such a phenomenon appears only well after the political unification of the country (1861) and indeed is barely discernible prior to World War II. Moreover, even once the creations of Italian couturiers became celebrated in international markets beginning in the 1950s, Italy’s fashion scene

Serbia: Urban Dress, 1945 to Twenty-First Century

Maja Studen Petrovic

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

After the end of World War II in 1945, Serbia joined five other republics to form the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia, which received its last official name, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, in 1963. The Communist takeover resulted in radical changes of the social system, because it was initially based on the Soviet model. The new age was also marked by cultural, educational, and scientific reorganization in line with Socialist standards, accompanied by propaganda clearly colored by id

Home Production

Tone Rasch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothes are connected to necessity as well as to luxury. The production of them can be viewed the same way. Many clothes have historically been produced at home but in different contexts. Sewing and needlework have been paid work, hobbies, and a part of domestic work during the last couple of centuries. In the early twentieth century, many (if not most) clothes and garments were made at home. This situation has changed, although textiles and clothing are still important parts of housekeeping in t

Norway

Tone Rasch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Is it possible to understand the way people dress by looking at their history and natural environment? A survey of Norwegians’ habits and attitudes related to clothing suggests that the answer is yes. The country is located on the periphery of the European continent. There are few inhabitants, and the combination of a long coastline and numerous mountain ranges has led to scattered settlements and great distances between them. Politically, Norway became independent in 1905 after being a part of t

Materials

Giorgio Riello

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Before 1800, fashionable individuals were defined as much by the textiles they chose as the styles they wore. There are characteristics shared by all textiles. First, they were used by people across society to construct notions of worth and appropriateness. Second, their importance in medieval, early modern, and modern European societies was linked to their value. Before industrialization reduced production costs, textiles remained generally luxuries. A third shared characteristic was their ubiqu

Sartorial Ideologies: From Homespun to Ready-Made

Michael Zakim

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Our clothes we brought with us are apt to be torn –

Shopping, Sewing, Networking, Complaining: Consumer Practices and the Relationship between State and Society

Judd Stitziel

Source: Fashioning Socialism. Clothing, Politics, and Consumer Culture in East Germany 2005

Book chapter

Starting already in the late 1940s, East Germans embarked on shopping trips with very specific desires and went from store to store and even from city to city in efforts to satisfy them.LAB, C Rep. 106, Nr. 142, Aktenvermerk, Köhler, Planök. Abt., Berlin, 19 March 1949. During the first major stage in the elimination of rationing for clothing and shoes in February 1951, a state trade official remarked that “the streets offered an almost peacetime-like picture, that is, women are beginning to sele

‘The Lady’s Economical Assistant’ of 1808

Janet Arnold

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

No one who has not been a frequent visitor in the homes of the poor, is aware of the extravagance and waste usual among women of a humble dress, arising from their total ignorance in matters of cutting out and needlework, nor how much instruction they want on these points even to the making of a petticoat and a pinafore. The same ignorance and unskilfulness, and the same consequent waste of laborious and scanty earnings is common among our female household servants; who by putting out their cloth

Patterns of Respectability: Publishing, Home Sewing and the Dynamics of Class and Gender 1870–1914

Christopher Breward

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

The amber sunshine poured in through the muslin curtains, drenching the room with light. It was a little room, plainly but nattily furnished. Everything in it was faded and touched with age; it was a clear, bright, honourable age, however, and not unlovely. A bowl of flowers stood on a table against the crisp white curtain; other flowers ranged in pots, crowded the window sill. There was a sewing machine in a corner – idle for the day was Sunday, and a great straw work-basket overflowing with ree

On the Margins: Theorizing the History and Significance of Making and Designing Clothes at Home

Cheryl Buckley

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

Arguably an account that addresses such questions requires a new way of speaking and a new position from which to speak, as a number of feminist writers have argued. (Alexander 1994; Braidotti 1994; hooks 1991; Massey 1994; Morris 1988; Roberts 1984, 1995; Steedman 1985)

Made at Home by Clever Fingers: Home Dressmaking in Edwardian England

Barbara Burman

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

I was busily at work on my dress yesterday evening (by the way, what a deal of work there is in a dress!) Diary entry 1905

Introduction

Barbara Burman

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

history is not the prerogative of the historian, nor even as postmodernism contends, a historian’s ‘invention’. It is, rather, a social form of knowledge; the work, in any given instance, of a thousand different hands. If this is true, the point of address in any discussion of historiography should not be the work of the individual scholar, nor yet rival schools of interpretation, but rather the ensemble of activities and practices in which ideas of history are embedded or a dialectic of past-pre

Homeworking and the Sewing Machine in the British Clothing Industry 1850–1905

Andrew Godley

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

A series of patents granted in the United States in the late 1840s and early 1850s formed the key components of the early sewing machine. The patent owners combined to form a patent-pool from 1856 to 1877, which determined the early structure of the sewing machine manufacturing industry. (Hounshell 1984: 67;Davies 1976: 5–12)The following section is drawn from Godley (1996). The principal manufacturers – Wheeler and Wilson, Willcox and Gibbs, Grover and Baker, and Singer – quickly established the

Home Economics and Home Sewing in the United States 1870–1940

Sally I. Helvenston and Margaret M. Bubolz

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

Sewing is an art as old as mankind. Transmitted by women from century to century, it has never lost its utility or its charm. Mother taught daughter; neighbor taught neighbor. As an attainment, it constitutes, for women and men alike, a lore all its own.

‘Your Clothes Are Materials of War’: The British Government Promotion of Home Sewing during the Second World War

Helen Reynolds

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

If every single garment now in the homes of Britain, every pot and pan, every sheet, every towel is used and kept usable until not even a magician could hold it together any longer, the war will won be more surely and more quickly.UK Public Record Office (PRO). B.T 64/3024. Letter from the Right Honourable Hugh Dalton M.P.

Home Sewing: Motivational Changes in the Twentieth Century

Sherry Schofield-Tomschin

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

The economy has frequently been stated as a motivation for home sewing. In fact, fabric retailing is considered to be ‘contracyclical’ in nature, meaning it does well when other industries are in a recession. (Queenan 1988: 15) One of the first studies on record that attempted to report the reasons for making garments at home found economics to be a strong motivation. During 1925 and 1926, O’Brien and Campbell surveyed 1,697 women in rural and urban communities from thirty-two states. (1927) The

There’s No Place Like Home: Home Dressmaking and Creativity in the Jamaican Community of the 1940s to the 1960s

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking 1999

Book chapter

The African-American author Alice Walker asks how and when did her mother ‘feed her creative spirit’. (Walker 1984: 239) As co-provider, mother and wife, Walker’s mother worked all day in the fields, made all her children’s clothes, the sheets and the quilts for the beds, in addition to the ‘traditional’ duties expected of her. It was in what Walker terms, the ‘ambitious gardens’ which her mother cultivated around and in their ‘shabby house’, working on them before she left for her field work and

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 23 of 23 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1