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How Muslim Women Dress in Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Islamic/Muslim dressIn order to understand fully Muslim female dress in Israel, some basic concepts will be clarified here. Islam, like most other religions, regulates the behavior of its believers.Linda B. Arthur ed., “Introduction,” Religion, Dress and the Body, Oxford and NY: Berg, 1999, p. 1. Like other faiths, its legal code lays down rules regarding the related fields of clothing and sexuality.Steele, Valerie, Fashion and Eroticism, Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Ja

Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

‘Look At Me I’M Different!’: Identity Art And The Expectations Of Race

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

National identification is an exemplary case of how an external border is reflected into an internal limit. Of course, the first step towards the identity of the nation is defined through differences from other nations, via an external border: if I identify myself as an Englishman, I distinguish myself from the French, German, Scots, Irish, and so on. However, in the next stage, the question is raised of who among the English are ‘the real English’, the paradigm of Englishness; who are the Englis

Exoticism At The Brink: Contemporary Chinese And Aboriginal Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

For a better understanding of this conundrum, it is useful to digress briefly using another analogy from the fashion industry proper. At the same time as Aboriginal art was ‘born’ in the 1970s, Parisian couture began to experience an extraordinary change with the entry of new designers: Takada, KenzoKenzo, Rei Kawakubo, ReiKawakubo (Comme des Garçons), Issey Miyake, IsseyMiyake, Yamomoto, YohjiYohji Yamamoto and Hanae Mori, HanaeMori are the most successful of these, now hailed as bringing about

Inside-Out: Outsider Artists Go Inside

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

The term ‘Outsider Art’ was coined in 1972 (a year after the ‘birth’ of Contemporary Aboriginal, Aboriginal artAboriginal art) by the English art critic Roger Cardinal, RogerCardinal as an umbrella term to describe the art produced by those not associated with, admitted to or educated by the art scene, denoting usually the insane, but also the parochial ingenue. ‘Outsider Art’ also incorporates the ‘Art BrutArt Brut’ of French postwar artist Jean Dubuffet, JeanDubuffet, and folk art as part of it

Ethnicity and the Catwalk

Melissa Marra-Alvarez

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion models possess an enduring appeal that impacts on both the world of fashion and society in general. Consequently, the lack of diversity on the catwalk in recent years has come to the fore of popular conscience. Some fashion scholars have argued that modeling practices may serve to shape our understanding and ways of seeing identity, including those based on ethnicity. Focusing on the latter half of the twentieth century, the emergence of “ethnic” models in fashion is described, examining

Jazz Style on the Catwalk, 1970s–2000s

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From 1970 to 2000, the influence of jazz culture on the women’s catwalk is pinpointed by the confluence of masculine and feminine details. Designers, during the three decades, interpreted the tuxedo and double-breasted suit that were standardized uniforms of early jazz musicians. Particularly for African American performers, these formal garments bolstered access to mainstream culture, social and economic equality, celebrity, and musical distinction. These utilities are paramount to its exhibitio

Gendered Identities, Ideologies and Cultural Difference

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

sheet music coversfunctions ofperformersmarketing song titlesmusic production systemmusic industrymass-marketsmarketingby performerscommercialization, of jazzPrior to the 1920s dominance of phonograph records and radio, a dominant American aesthetic was disseminated into households via illustrated sheet music covers. These booklets contained descriptive cover art, music, lyrics, dance instructions and photographs, publicityphotographs of performers that stimulated popular interest in songwriters,

Beyond The Gardenia: Billie Holiday

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

Holiday, Billieinfluence of Hollywoodstyleof Billie HolidayHoliday, Billiedress/style ofOn April 7, 1915, Eleanora Fagan, who would later become known as Billie Holiday, was born in Philadelphia to Sadie, a single mother. This simple event did not foreshadow the star that would suddenly shine bright and burn out within a few decades. In Baltimore, Fagan’s Holiday, Billieearly yearsearly years included a laboring mother, an absent father, truancy, rape by a neighbor and time at an institution for

Introduction: Dress History Now: Terms, Themes and Tools

Charlotte Nicklas and Annebella Pollen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Terminology is a perpetual difficulty in the study of dress history: how should ‘dress’, ‘fashion’, ‘clothing’ (or ‘clothes’) and ‘costume’ be defined and distinguished from each other? In current scholarship, how do ‘dress history’, ‘fashion history’ and ‘fashion studies’ differ? The meanings of these words and phrases overlap and interconnect, their definitions continuing to challenge researchers (Cumming 2004: 8, 15; Harte 2009: 176; Taylor 2013: 26). Joanne Eicher and Susan Kaiser both emphas

Donna Summer

Amanda M. B. Pajak

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Donna Summer (1948–2012), born LaDonna Adrian Gaines of Boston, Massachusetts, was titled the “Queen of Disco” during her lifetime and beyond. Predominantly active as a singer-performer during the disco era of the mid- to late 1970s, Summer’s vocal talent and performance aesthetic defined an era of music in addition to an evolution of fashion tied to the hedonistic nightlife of New York City and Los Angeles that was synonymous with the excess and extravagance of the decade. During live performanc

Racial Sameness and Racial Difference

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Locating the Real: America Ferrera, Fashion, Ethnicity and Authenticity

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

There was Rachel in Friends, there was Carrie in SATC, then there was Ugly Betty.

‘To The Ends of The Earth’: Fashion and Ethnicity in The Vogue Fashion Shoot

Sarah Cheang

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

The August 2007 issue of British Vogue contains a twenty-page fashion story with the heroic, romantic and evocative title ‘To the Ends of the Earth’. Photographed by Tim Walker in Papua New Guinea, a set of sixteen entrancing and startling pictures dramatize fashion through portraits of the model in physical and editorial juxtaposition with landscapes, forests and local tribesmen. These arresting images are deliberately set in place. They are given an explicit and expanded sense of location by wr

Fashion Modelling, Blink Technologies and New Imaging Regimes

Elizabeth Wissinger

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

The imaging regime dominated by the Internet has changed many things. In a world now punctuated by pop-ups, pings and tweets, we relate to images differently. Images dance at the margins of our vision whether we are at work or at play. With the dawn of this imaging regime in the late 1980s and early 1990s, attention spans have been overwhelmed, pathways of suggestion have proliferated and the volatility of markets has reached a rapid boil.

Yoruba in Nigeria and Diaspora

Rowland Abiodun

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Yoruba people number well over thirty million from about sixteen ancient kingdoms. They spread all over southwestern Nigeria and extend well into the neighboring countries of Benin and Togo. The Yoruba have been urbanized since the first millennium c.e. and are well known for their fine artistic achievements, especially the naturalistic life-size bronze heads and terra-cotta sculptures of Ile-Ife. In addition to being among the most accomplished carvers in wood and ivory in Africa, the Yoruba

Benin

Joseph C.E. Adande

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Republic of Benin is bounded in the south by the Atlantic Ocean, in the north by Niger and Burkina Faso, in the east by Nigeria, and in the west by Togo. Thus, it naturally shares both history and culture with the peoples of these neighboring countries. In Benin, clothing, regardless of definition, is as complex and varied as its numerous linguistic groups. In the Benin Republic, Vodun adepts and masquerade performers dress primarily to please their gods and offer them the appropriate manifes

Missionary Dress in Samoa

Prue Ahrens

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The first European Christian missionaries to establish a station in the South Pacific were members of the London Missionary Society (LMS) who arrived in Tahiti in 1797. Over the next one hundred years a number of European Christian denominations established missions there. For example, mission stations were established in Tonga by Wesleyans (1826) and Marists (1832), and in the Gilberts and Ellice Islands (now Kiribati and Tuvalu) by the LMS (1877) and the Catholic Sacred Heart Mission (1881). In

Aboriginal Dress in the Kimberley, Western Australia

Kim Akerman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As in most other areas of Australia, the Aboriginals of the Kimberley were traditionally unclothed. For them, dress consisted of headbands and hair belts. Pubic tassels (made by tying multiple strands of spun fur or hair string into a mop, suspended over the genital area) were worn occasionally. Other elements of dress consisted of ornaments made from feathers, fibers, animal teeth, or shell, the use of which was often dictated by the ceremonial and social status of the wearer. More complex ornam

Iraqi Dress

Ulrike Al-Khamis and Saad Lafta Hami

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Iraq is one of the largest countries in southwestern Asia. It is bordered by Iran to the east, Turkey to the north, Syria and Jordan to the west, and Saudi Arabia and Kuwait to the south. Iraq’s capital is Baghdad. Geographically, the country combines three distinct regions: fertile mountain regions in the north, the rich alluvial valleys of the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers, and expansive, arid desert plains in the west. Both the terrain and the bordering countries have had an influence on dress.

Lower Niger Delta Peoples and Diaspora

Martha G. Anderson and E. J. Alagoa

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The inhabitants of the Niger Delta speak dozens of languages and represent nine different language groups. Populations range in size from the Ijo, a diverse group of about two million who live in communities spread throughout the Delta, to the Defaka, who number only about two hundred and occupy a single village. Larger groups include the Urhobo, Isoko, Itsekiri, Ikwerre, Ekpeye, Ogoni, and Obolo (or Andoni). Most Delta groups have maintained their own languages and distinct identities, but they

Headdresses and Hairdos

Mary Jo Arnoldi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Headwear has been an important feature of everyday wear and ceremonial display in Africa from ancient times to the present day. Hats and hairstyles can mark or celebrate changes in the life cycle, denote a person’s status in the community, signal membership in a religious or initiation society, designate key participants at rituals and festivals, or identify political and religious leaders and occupational specialists. Hats designed for daily wear provide pragmatic solutions to the problem of phy

Hawaiian Dress Prior to 1898

Linda Boynton Arthur

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hawai’i is an archipelago in the Pacific Ocean, a chain referred to simply as Hawai’i or the Hawaiian Islands. The six major islands are Oahu, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and the Big Island, that is, Hawai’i. The latter name is rarely used, in order to reduce confusion, since Hawai’i (the archipelago) became an American state in 1959. Until the late eighteenth century the peoples who inhabited these islands shared a common culture, although they were somewhat divided politically in that each had

Moko Māori: Skin Modification

Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Linda Waimarie Nikora and Mohi Robert Rua

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Māori people settled Aotearoa (New Zealand) from the islands of the eastern Pacific, coming in successive waves over many centuries. They brought with them the languages, music, belief systems, and technologies of their cultures of origin. They also brought the practice of permanent skin modification. Tattoo chisels similar to those used in western Polynesia have been found in some of the earliest excavations. With the new environment came new resources: massive hardwood forests, nephrite and

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