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Constructing Fashionable Dress and Identity in Bhutan

Emma Dick

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The relationship between ‘western style’ tailoring education and the construction of street-style fashion in Bhutan is the focus of the chapter by Emma Dick. She argues that there has been a unique interplay between exposure to international fashions and the projection of national dress in the emergence of a distinct language of street-style and associated identity in Bhutan. Central to the development of a fashion-conscious Bhutanese identity has been the blend of traditional media and new socia

Academic Research on Footwear

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Human beings have been covering their feet and wearing some form of footwear for centuries. While there are countless accounts on who created the first shoes or why/where they were first made, the primary common reason for wearing shoes was to protect feet from an unpleasant or dangerous natural environment. For instance, an American sailor’s shoe in the nineteenth century was made out of hemp cord because it provided traction even when it was wet, and double rubber-walled insulated boots were ma

Introduction

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

White Lotus, the theme of the funeral that has transported us into the world of fashion designers and the South Delhi business elite, is a fitting metaphor for the key motif of this book. It is also a fitting metaphor for the ethnographic journey in which this work is grounded and for its analytical angle. Like the lotus, the beauties ritualof Indian fashion and heritage luxuryheritage luxury cannot be conceived without their juxtaposition, without the mud from which they grow and that brings the

Charitable Non-Love and Philanthrocapitalism

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 4 further develops the theme of power relations between design and craft and between the rich and the poor. Many designers working with craftspeople also run non-governmental organizations to ‘empower’ these workers, while cultivating the rhetoric of ethical business and philanthropy, and offering their customers in addition to luxurious clothing also good conscience. Such NGOs and trusts become effective tools of co-option of the village workforce into the capitalist system and reproduce

“My Man, Let Me Pull Your Coat to Something”: Malcolm X

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

[P]eople are always speculating—why am I as I am? To understand that of any person, his whole life, from birth must be reviewed. All of our experiences fuse into our personality. Everything that ever happened to us is an ingredient.

Being Fashionable in the Globalization Era in India: Holy Writing on Garments

Janaki Turaga

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Using a case study of ‘holy fashion’ in India, Janaki Turaga explores why this has become so popular in a nation that is grappling with rapid modernization and globalization amid the retention of the traditions and heritage of ancient India. Indicatively, fashion-conscious Indians have embraced a diverse range of ‘secularised sacred’ fashion garments that were previously reserved for believers in culturally prescribed sacred contexts in order to demonstrate fashion and lifestyle statements. Garme

Secular Fashion In Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

national dress/costumeSabraIsrael, twentieth centuryIn national images depicting the early years of the State of Israel, the word “fashion” is deliberately associated with the unkempt pioneering sabra look: khakikhaki shorts and blue shirts characteristic of the socialist youth movements, pinafores and rubashka shirts influenced by Eastern European style, Bedouin kaffiyahkaffiyahs, biblical sandals, and dome-shaped caps known as kova tembel. To a large extent, this look became Israel’s national m

How Muslim Women Dress in Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Islamic/Muslim dressIn order to understand fully Muslim female dress in Israel, some basic concepts will be clarified here. Islam, like most other religions, regulates the behavior of its believers.Linda B. Arthur ed., “Introduction,” Religion, Dress and the Body, Oxford and NY: Berg, 1999, p. 1. Like other faiths, its legal code lays down rules regarding the related fields of clothing and sexuality.Steele, Valerie, Fashion and Eroticism, Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Ja

Fashion and Feminism

Henriette Dahan-Kalev and Shoshana-Rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

civil rightsgenderDuring the French Revolution, dress became an important issue: one of the ways in which revolutionaries’ values were to be obtained and symbolized was through the adoption of class-less styles of clothing, which expressed the ideals of Fraternity, Liberty, and Equality.

Rabbinical Dress in Italy

Asher Salah

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The promulgation of sumptuary laws, regulating specific items of dress that might be worn by various individuals on certain occasions, is a well-known chapter of European social history from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.On Jewish sumptuary legislation in general see: Salo Wittmayer Baron, The Jewish Community: Its History and Structure to the American Revolution, 3 vols, Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1942; Louis Finkelstein, Jewish Self-Government in the Middle Ages,

Fashion under the Occupation

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The house of Jacques Heim is no longer a Jewish house.

Military Dress as an Ideological Marker in Roman Palestine

Guy D. Stiebel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Only a few instances from the Roman Empire actually provide scholars with near-complete assemblages of panoplies, and most rare of all are the remains that derived directly from conflict lands. In addition to the celebrated navy soldier from ce79 Herculaneum,R. Gore, “2000 Years of Silence: The Dead Do Tell Tales at Vesuvius,” National Geographic, 165 (1984), pp. 557–613; S. Ortisi “Pompeji und Herculaneum—Soldaten in den Vesuvsdäten,” Archäologie der Schlachtfelder—Militaria aus Zerstörungshoriz

Controversial Catwalk: Comme des Garçons’ “Sleep” Collection, 1995

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In 1995, Comme des Garçons provoked controversy with a collection featuring distressed fabric that bore faded boot prints, along with loose-fitting loungewear of blue-and-white striped cotton. Although Rei Kawakubo herself denied any intentional reference to the Holocaust, audiences saw the boot prints as references to bodies trampled underfoot, the vertically striped pajamas as imitations of those worn by concentration camp inmates. Large, “meaningless” numbers, printed onto hems, seemed to invi

Islamic Style

Magdalena Crăciun

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Fashion designers have found inspiration in past and present sartorial repertoires. Islamically appropriate forms of covered dress have aesthetically been drawn upon as well. Consequently, headscarves, face veils and head-to-toe outerwear have occasionally appeared on the catwalk. Fashion commentators have pointed out that such creations and assemblages referenced ethic, traditional, historical, exotic or oriental dress, and only rarely labelled their source of inspiration as Islamic style. The n

Imperial Sociocultural Systems and Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Bridal Wear

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The evolution of the bridal gown, and its history, aesthetic, and rituals, are significant within our cultural history and have an influence on the contemporary wedding ceremony. Modern designers continue to be influenced by fashion history, or may reflect current styles and concerns. This article predominantly refers to the white wedding gown worn traditionally in Western Christian cultures, its heritage, and the wedding dress as archival object.

Moroccan Fashion as Tradition

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, there have been a number of political events that have had an important impact on the development of Moroccan fashion. Under the French FrenchProtectorateProtectorate, for example, it was decided to separate the new European city centres from the indigenousindigenous Arab city centres. This resulted in a cultural buffer against French cultural influences, allowing the continuity of a Moroccan lifestylelifestyle. Over time, this led to two more

Antonio Berardi

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The People and Places of Costume Production

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Cultural fields are vulnerable to the effects of time in that no field can be expected to remain the same, even as its products and its rationale appear consistent. The essential framework of costume production in Mumbai has remained the same for nearly one hundred years, including its institutional figures (on-set costumers, or dressmen) and local economic contingencies (the vast number and versatility of tailors in the city). But any conversation with retired personnel brings to light the chang

Costume and Character: Wearing and Being

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

My clothes may express the dressmaker, but they don’t express me.

Costume and the Body

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The difference between a costume designer and fashion designer? The boutiques, they can just provide you with a salwar kurta, but not a good fit. For a film you require to be perfect. If you have a defect on the shoulders, if you have a defect on your arm, if you have a defect on your waist or hips, it is the costume designer who has to work on that and see how you are looking. Whatever defect is there in your body has to be removed.

Fashion and Spectacle

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.

Dressing the Past

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The demands of costuming for period films are, in some ways, comparable to those for contemporary films. At the same time, they are distinctly different, since the clothes must evoke in viewers a sense of a past of which they typically have little or no direct experience.This is the “veridiction contract” (Calefato 2004, 92), which refers to the production of “truth” within constrained social and historical circumstances. In other words, not only must what is considered to be true conform to cert

Beyond the Screen

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Who ever saw his old clothes—his old coat, actually worn out, resolved into its primitive elements, so that it was not a deed of charity to bestow it on some poor boy…

Fashion and the Law: The Muslim Headscarf and The Modern Woman

Barbara Vinken

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

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