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Children’s Wear Presentations

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT),Children's wear presentationsage and genderThe Children's wear presentationschildrenchildren’s wear designer must be aware of various age groups and their special requirements. From newborns to early teens, each group has specific needs determined by the developmental growth of the child and his or her physical abilities. For portfolio purposes, it is important to define these age groups visually by pose and attitude, which demonstrate the child’s capabilitie

Body Types and Size Charts

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The Late Middle Ages c. 1300 – 1500

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As medieval monarchs successfully centralized their governments, the power of nobles and knights declined. Feudalism began to wane before the 14th century, because kings found new sources of revenue by taxing cities and towns. The income allowed them to hire knights who fought as long as they were paid. Monarchs learned that a paid army was more dependable than feudal nobles.

The Italian Renaissance

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As lawyers and notaries in Italian city-states sought to justify the independence of these territories, they became interested in the writings of the Classical Period. Many early Renaissance writers, such as Petrarch, a gifted Italian poet and writer who lived from 1304 to 1374, were trained in the law. They embraced the humanistic approach of the classics, rejecting what they saw as a narrow, academic philosophy in the medieval universities. By the early years of the 15th century, a revival of i

The Northern Renaissance

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By the beginning of the 16th century, northern Europe had experienced a gradual transition to participation in the new spirit of the Renaissance. Along with changes in arts and letters came profound changes in religious attitudes, which led some Christians to separate from the Roman Catholic Church. The Protestant Reformation, which began in the German states of the Holy Roman Empire, split Europe into two hostile religious camps.

The Seventeenth Century 1600–1700

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress is often used to communicate social status in both obvious and subtle ways. In a society in which social classes are well defined, customs relating to dress are frequently a visible symbol of one’s rank.

The Eighteenth Century 1700–1790

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Upon the death of Louis XIV in 1715, his great-grandson, Louis XV, became king of France at the age of 5. During the time that the king was too young to reign alone, a period called the Regency (1715–1723), baroque art styles that had dominated in the previous century underwent a gradual change. The new style lines were less massive, the curves were more slender and delicate, and an emphasis on asymmetrical balance gained importance. This new, rococo, style reached its height during the reign of

The Directoire Period and the Empire Period 1790–1820

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The Directoire period (c. 1790–1800) includes the French Revolution and the establishment of the Directory (in French, Directoire), a government by a five-man executive body. The Empire period followed, coinciding generally with the period during which Napoleon Bonaparte was head of state in France. Indeed, the name of the period derives from the name of his era, the Napoleonic empire.

The Romantic Period 1820–1850

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In its emphasis on sentiment and feeling, Romanticism represented a reaction against the formal classical styles of the 17th and 18th centuries. Romantics rejected the classical insistence on rules governing creative work. Content was more important than form; rules could be broken. Romantic writers assumed that “empirical science and philosophy were inadequate as a means of answering all the most important questions concerning human life” (Harris, 1969, 19). Romantic artists appealed to the emot

The Crinoline Period 1850–1870

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The increasing width of women’s skirts had been leading to the use of multiple layers of stiffened petticoats. In September 1856 the editor of Peterson’s Magazine hailed the revival of the 18th-century hoopskirts as a means of holding out these voluminous skirts:

The Bustle Period and the Nineties 1870–1900

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By the time bustle skirts had become popular fashions, Queen Victoria had been ruler of Great Britain for just over 30 years and would remain Britain’s ruler for 30 years more. During the earlier years of Victoria’s reign, the British had come to share a common ideal with particular emphasis on the importance of morality and high standards of conduct.

The Edwardian Period and World War I 1900–1920

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

From 1900 to 1920, many societal, political, and technological changes occurred that dramatically altered life for many people. Innovations such as the telephone and cable cars and trolleys made communication and travel easier. With enhanced interest and access to college and university education, and increased variety and complexity of jobs, more people needed simpler, easier to acquire clothing. By the beginning of the 20th century, ready-to-wear clothing, offered in a variety of styles, quanti

The Twenties, Thirties, and World War II 1920–1947

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

With the end of World War I, Europe and the United States hoped for a return to normalcy. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, a strong proponent of the League of Nations, campaigned arduously for ratification of the Treaty of Versailles and membership for the United States in the League. These efforts cost him his health—he suffered a breakdown in 1919—and he was an invalid for the remainder of his 17 months in office. In the end, the Senate defeated the treaty, and the United States never joined the

The New Look: Fashion Conformity Prevails

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

During the 1950s the world became a much smaller place. The rapid development of air travel, the almost instant transmission of news from one part of the world to another, and the transition from national to globally interdependent economies spread fashion and other information faster than ever before (Figure 17.1). It was no longer possible to understand the historical background of a period by examining developments only in western Europe and North America.

How to Measure, Size, and Grade

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Designing Children’s Wear

Evelyn L. Brannon

Source: Designer’s Guide to Fashion Apparel, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“Kids’ fashion has become the great vehicle to communicate your well-being. It’s not about practicality, it’s about imagery.”

Front and Back View Croquis Figures

Michele Wesen Bryant and Diane DeMers

Source: The Spec Manual, 2nd Edition, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Introduction to Patternmaking

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Patternmaking = pattern drafting, pattern draping, and flat patternmaking

Taking Measurements, Body Forms, and Live Models

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The ability to take accurate measurements from body forms and live models is an important skill that all patternmakers must learn. Working with a body form is less complicated than working with a live model. Body forms can be pinned into, drawn on, are always available, and never gain or lose weight. Live models must be treated gently, their modesty needs to be respected, and they may gain or lose weight; however, your final garment is produced for a live person to wear. Live models are very valu

Drafting the Sloper Set

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“Sloper” is a term given to a very basic set of pattern pieces from which you can flat pattern almost any style. Flat patternmaking is a design process in which a sloper is used to create a pattern for a new style by tracing the sloper onto pattern paper and then manipulating the traced copy. Some styles are much more successful when draped instead of flat patterned. Thus, selected chapters in this text show some styles that are draped instead of flat patterned, because of the textile used for th

Draping the Sloper Set

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The sloper set was introduced in Chapter 3, which introduced methods for drafting the bodice, sleeve, skirt, and trouser for Junior’s, Misses’, and Women’s sizes. However, drafting is only one method of making the sloper set; draping is another option. Pattern draping is a design process that involves pinning and marking pieces of fabric on a fit model to produce a pattern piece, which is then transferred onto paper to create various clothing styles. Draping the sloper pieces may result in a bett

Dart Manipulation for Bodices, Sleeves, and Skirts

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter introduces dart manipulation and the flat pattern techniques of slash and spread and pivoting. All of the styles shown in this chapter have the same finished measurements on all outer edges of the pattern as the sloper pieces; only the dart placement will change. “Finished” means the measurements do not include the dart intakes. This chapter also covers details such as the development of facings and button loop closure. Style 0508 is shown complete with seam allowance, a pattern char

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