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Sneakers as Fashion: Reclaiming Masculine Adornment

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Fashion is considered as a complex social practicepractice in which challenges to reform male appearances are sometimes made by figures with the powerpower to expect obedience. Men have also used their appearance as a strategy of refusal or disinterest in the dominant culture that surrounds them. Others have been reformers who tried to convince the populace that their model of dress would lead to better social relationships. (McNeil 2009: 15)

Sneakers as A Subculture: Emerging From Underground to Upperground

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It [subculture] has come to signify the twentieth-century category for youth groups who possess some sort of marked style and shared affiliations. Whereas sociologists use the term to describe an infinitely wider array of groups—sport fishermen, West Texas Baptists, or toy train hobbyists—“subculture” is more popularly used to characterize groups of young people. (Clark 2003: 223, footnote 2)

Menswear Through the Ages

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is only the modern that ever becomes old-fashioned.

Design Research and Inspiration

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

You can say that designing is quite easy; the difficulty lies in finding a new way to explore beauty.

Sportswear, Knit, and Print

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Men's fashions all start as sports clothes and progress to the great occasions of state. The tail coat, which started out as a hunting coat, is just finishing such a journey. The tracksuit is just beginning one.

Design Development for Menswear

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A man should look as if he’s bought his clothes with intelligence, put them on with care and forgotten all about them.

Menswear Presentations

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There are three responses toa piece of design—yes, no,and wow! Wow is the one toaim for.

Menswear

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Women's clothes have been influenced by menswear as far back as the 1930s, when Marlene Dietrich was photographed wearing an adaptation of a man's suit. Additionally, Yves Saint Laurent has been designing tuxedo suits for women for the last 30 years.

Watchmen

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

practicalitycapeappropriationAlan Moore, AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons, DaveGibbons’ WatchmenWatchmen (1986–1987) is a deconstruction of the superhero comic that poses the question “what if superheroes [and their costumes] were real?” (Thompson, 2005, p. 105). Such self-conscious responses to genre occur, writes Geoff Klock (2002, p. 3), when the “building density of tradition becomes anxiety.” The superhero genre has mushroomed to such proportions that it seems uncontrollable, providing audiences w

Body Types and Size Charts

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Lost in A Gaze: Young Men and Fashion in Contemporary Japan

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

‘Do you understand muslins, sir?’JaneAusten, Northanger Abbey (London: Penguin Books, 1996 [1818]), p. 22.

Boy’s Elegance: A Liminality of Boyish Charm and Old-World Suavity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

T-shirts with voluminous scarves are now in store . . . the big scarf looks lovely!Milkboy Staff’s Blog, 2013, available at http://ameblo.jp/mb-staff/page-67.html#main [accessed 7 October 2013]. The texts are translated by Masafumi Monden.

An Ivy Boy and A Preppy Girl: Style Import-Export

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Taking great care of appearance is the first step of every fashion.

Concluding Japanese Fashion Cultures, Change and Continuity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

For both men and women, whenever sex is an issue, so also is looking and being seen. Every woman who has ever been accosted on the street knows the temporary desire to be invisible, just as every person of either sex has posed in public, hoping to be regarded as attractive by his or her peers.ValerieSteele, Fashion and Eroticism: Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Jazz Age (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985), p. 247.

Crete and Greece c. 2900 – 100 BCE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

On the narrow island of Crete in the eastern Mediterranean, another civilization flourished over much the same period of time as that of the Egyptians and Mesopotamians. Named for their legendary king, Minos, the Minoan people enjoyed peace and prosperity from c. 2900 to 1450 BCE and developed an elegant culture (Figure 3.1).

Etruria and Rome c. 800 BCE – 400 CE

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Prehistoric human occupants of the Italian peninsula migrated to Italy from many different places: Africa, Sicily, Spain, France, the Danube Valley, and Switzerland. They left no written records and are known only through archeological remains. These remains tell us they were pastoral people who tilled the soil, wove clothing, and made pottery and bronze implements. Among the pre-Roman peoples who migrated into Italy, none left a deeper impression than the Etruscans.

The Early Middle Ages c. 330 – 1500

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In 330, Roman Emperor Constantine moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium, a Greek port city. The city, renamed Constantinople, became the capital of the Byzantine Empire. Located at the entrance of the Black Sea, the city and its surrounding territories commanded both land and sea trade routes between the west and central Asia, Russia, and east Asia. At the same time, the city was protected by the rugged Balkan Mountains from the invading barbarians who overran Rome and the Italian peninsula.

The Late Middle Ages c. 1300 – 1500

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As medieval monarchs successfully centralized their governments, the power of nobles and knights declined. Feudalism began to wane before the 14th century, because kings found new sources of revenue by taxing cities and towns. The income allowed them to hire knights who fought as long as they were paid. Monarchs learned that a paid army was more dependable than feudal nobles.

The Italian Renaissance

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As lawyers and notaries in Italian city-states sought to justify the independence of these territories, they became interested in the writings of the Classical Period. Many early Renaissance writers, such as Petrarch, a gifted Italian poet and writer who lived from 1304 to 1374, were trained in the law. They embraced the humanistic approach of the classics, rejecting what they saw as a narrow, academic philosophy in the medieval universities. By the early years of the 15th century, a revival of i

The Northern Renaissance

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By the beginning of the 16th century, northern Europe had experienced a gradual transition to participation in the new spirit of the Renaissance. Along with changes in arts and letters came profound changes in religious attitudes, which led some Christians to separate from the Roman Catholic Church. The Protestant Reformation, which began in the German states of the Holy Roman Empire, split Europe into two hostile religious camps.

The Seventeenth Century 1600–1700

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress is often used to communicate social status in both obvious and subtle ways. In a society in which social classes are well defined, customs relating to dress are frequently a visible symbol of one’s rank.

The Eighteenth Century 1700–1790

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Upon the death of Louis XIV in 1715, his great-grandson, Louis XV, became king of France at the age of 5. During the time that the king was too young to reign alone, a period called the Regency (1715–1723), baroque art styles that had dominated in the previous century underwent a gradual change. The new style lines were less massive, the curves were more slender and delicate, and an emphasis on asymmetrical balance gained importance. This new, rococo, style reached its height during the reign of

The Directoire Period and the Empire Period 1790–1820

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The Directoire period (c. 1790–1800) includes the French Revolution and the establishment of the Directory (in French, Directoire), a government by a five-man executive body. The Empire period followed, coinciding generally with the period during which Napoleon Bonaparte was head of state in France. Indeed, the name of the period derives from the name of his era, the Napoleonic empire.

The Romantic Period 1820–1850

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In its emphasis on sentiment and feeling, Romanticism represented a reaction against the formal classical styles of the 17th and 18th centuries. Romantics rejected the classical insistence on rules governing creative work. Content was more important than form; rules could be broken. Romantic writers assumed that “empirical science and philosophy were inadequate as a means of answering all the most important questions concerning human life” (Harris, 1969, 19). Romantic artists appealed to the emot

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