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Charles James

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

The Queen

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In 2015, Queen Elizabeth II became Britain’s longest-reigning monarch, having occupied the throne since 1952—over sixty-three years. The royal wardrobe has been of interest to the world since her childhood, and as a young woman, the clothes she wore for royal tours abroad and official visits were very influential. The designs produced for her by British couturiers were copied for the mass market. In the early twenty-first century, the Queen’s immaculate appearance transcends the vagaries of fashi

Ball Gowns

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Ball gowns are considered to be the most extravagant category of evening dress. Although balls date back to the Middle Ages, and historically were seen as dance parties to celebrate all manner of occasions, they reemerged as a popular way to introduce eligible women and men into marriageable society during the mid-1800s. Competition for suitors centered on the expense and opulence of a woman’s ball gown. Subsequently, ball gowns have continued to represent ideals of romantic femininity. On the ca

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1984

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was all about simplicity, which led Nina Hyde at the Washington Post to comment, “Blass’s clothes have never been more simple, less contrived.” The hems were short because Blass believed that his couture customers had the money to keep their body in great shape. There were bra-like tops under conservative suits for day, and evening gowns in silk charmeuse draped in silk chiffon. Because of the simplicity of the clothes, the models’ hair was more extreme. Critics commended Blass’s

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1988

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was inspired by Matisse paintings that Bill Blass saw while at the National Gallery in Washington. Shown at the Parsons School of Design in New York, the clothes were short and full of froufrou due to the influence of “the sugar daddy of bonbon chic” and designer of the moment Christian Lacroix, and his short, little-girl styles. Hems were well above the knees, which concerned retailers servicing working women needing office-appropriate clothes. Even though critics liked his use o

Red or Dead

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Donna Karan

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Introduction: Dress History Now: Terms, Themes and Tools

Charlotte Nicklas and Annebella Pollen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Terminology is a perpetual difficulty in the study of dress history: how should ‘dress’, ‘fashion’, ‘clothing’ (or ‘clothes’) and ‘costume’ be defined and distinguished from each other? In current scholarship, how do ‘dress history’, ‘fashion history’ and ‘fashion studies’ differ? The meanings of these words and phrases overlap and interconnect, their definitions continuing to challenge researchers (Cumming 2004: 8, 15; Harte 2009: 176; Taylor 2013: 26). Joanne Eicher and Susan Kaiser both emphas

Ali MacGraw

Anne Reimers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

American actress Ali MacGraw’s outfits and styling in the classic weepie Love Story (1970) were defining for a generation. Her look came to represent the aspirational wardrobe and beauty ideal of the upper middle-class, Ivy League university “preppy,” regularly referenced by American fashion brands. MacGraw’s offscreen style, more bohemian and artistic with floaty dresses and scarves, was equally influential. The designer she is most closely associated with, however, is Halston, and his brand of

Nicole Farhi (house)

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Amanda Wakeley

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Norman Hartnell

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Skinheads

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The skinhead style emerged in the 1960s in London as a fusion between “rude boy” style and “mod” style, and is as such a subgenre of the working-class street style that emerged after World War II. The name of the style refers to the characteristic shaved hairdo, which is often associated with racism and violence. But actually, the style is a characteristic example of the bridging between black and white cultures that goes back decades, even hundreds of years, in Western menswear. Stylistically, i

Céline

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Salvatore Ferragamo

Daphne Stylianou

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

The Empress’s Old Clothes: Biographies of African Dress at the Victoria And Albert Museum

Nicola Stylianou

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

On 20 April 1869 the V&A accessioned a number of objects from Ethiopia including clothes and jewellery that were listed in the museum register as having been given to the museum by the ‘Secretary of State for India’ and ‘belonging formerly to the Queen of Abyssinia’ (V&A 1869). At this time the V&A had not yet been divided into departments with objects being accepted for inclusion in the museum on the grounds of design excellence or as demonstrations of particular techniques. Included in this gif

John Rocha, Spring/Summer 1988

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For the spring/summer 1988 season, the concept of power dressing still guided designers. Menswear continued to provide inspiration for both the silhouettes and the materials for women’s wear. Rocha offered work-appropriate looks with an overall softer feel, with added feminine details such as a crochet lace collar. The hourglass shape was key to the collection, with many of the dresses featuring a fitted bodice that opened up into a voluminous skirt. Rocha used different necklines to distinguish

The Post-War Market For Men’s Clothing

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

The Art Versus Commerce Debate

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Sedimenting The Youth Market

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

“The Language of the Fan”: Pushing the Boundaries of Middle-class Womanhood

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories 2012

Book chapter

In the nineteenth century the British tried to revive the art of fanmaking in part in order to address what Victorians had come to call the “surplus women question.” This debate, which centered around definitions of what type of woman a middle-class lady should be and what her place should be within society, came to the fore because of statistics revealed by the 1851 Census. Victorians exaggerated the census data in order to emphasize the seriousness of having a population of women who had no pla

Narratives are a way for human beings of the past and present to understand their experiences and guide their actions.Somers, “The Narrative Constitution of Identity,” 613–14. An important metanarrative of Victorian society was the advent of democracy and constitutional government. Every British school child of the nineteenth century knew the progressive narrative of the rise of parliamentary democracy beginning with the Magna Carta, passing through the “Glorious Revolution,” and ending with the

“The Real Thing”: The Celluloid Vanity Set and the Search for Authenticity

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories 2012

Book chapter

By the end of the nineteenth century it was generally understood that the elephant population was in serious crisis because of the ivory trade.R. F.du Toit, S. N.Stuart, and D.H.M.Cumming, African Elephants and Rhinos: Sattus Survey and Conservation Action Plan (Gland, Switzerland: Nature Conservation Bureau, 1990), 3. Between 1800 and 1850 ivory imports into the United Kingdom increased from 119 tons to 458 tons.AbdulSheriff, Slaves, Spices and Ivory in Zanzibar: Integration of an East African C

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