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Celebrity and Fashion, Past and Present

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

‘Celebrity culture’ in a recognizably modern but still rudimentary form could be said to have emerged in the late eighteenth century. The period witnessed the new scientific discoveries and consequent technological developments associated with the Industrial Revolution. They would transform Western society from a predominantly rural one into one increasingly centred on urban and industrial life. Some of the new technologies also made possible the wide circulation of printed material—newspapers, b

Heads of State and Dress

Suzanne Gott

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The modes of dress worn by African heads of state since independence have served as highly visible expressions of political philosophies and programs during different periods of national leadership. African leaders have also developed memorable trademark ensembles for projecting political personas.

Political Candidates and Dress

Susan B. Kaiser and Janet Hethorn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In electoral politics, candidates face delicate balancing acts in matters of dress. They must represent (and therefore fit in with) the people they seek to serve; yet they also need to establish themselves as leaders who stand out/above. It helps to look good and dress well, but not to the extent that potential voters suspect the politician has little substance (and “only style”). Further considerations include the need not to appear too vain or self-absorbed. The ways in which political candidat

Historical Evidence: Tibet

Valrae Reynolds

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

There is evidence of human habitation in Tibet since Neolithic times. Despite geographical isolation, Tibetans had links with ancient Eastern and European cultures. Chinese records from the seventh to tenth centuries, while emphasizing the civilizing Chinese influence on Tibetans, provide significant information. Homespun woolens have been excavated from Neolithic and later sites. Imported luxuries, especially silk, feature prominently in Tibetan texts. After the Tibetan empire collapsed in the n

Libya

Doran H. Ross

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As part of North Africa, Libya has shared a long dress history with its neighbors Egypt, Algeria, and Tunisia. Most of what is now coastal Libya was ruled by successive foreign powers, initially the Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans. They brought their own dress traditions, exerting temporary influence on privileged local peoples. The Muslim Arab invasions, leading to control of the coast and interior by 663 c.e., established more enduring practices; Muslim dress protocols were sustained by Islamic

Reza Shah’s Dress Reforms in Iran

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Some of the most enduring and controversial legacies of the reign of Reza Shah Pahlavi, the shah of Iran from 1925 to 1941, were the changes he made in the dress of both men and women living in Iran. The repercussions of these changes can still be felt in the early twenty-first century.

Mao Suit

Verity Wilson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Military Fashion and Coup d’Etat in Chile

Carmen Oquendo-Villar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The political deployment of media was crucial for the success of the 1973 coup in Chile in which a military junta overthrew President Salvador Allende. It was also vital for the launching of the president of the junta, Augusto Pinochet Ugarte, onto the national scene. His image—including his body image, uniforms, and accoutrements—was meticulously stage-managed in print media, film documentaries, and television images to convey political meaning and to achieve control over a chaotic social body o

Evo Morales and the Politics of Dress in Bolivia

Elayne Zorn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

On January 21, 2006, Evo Morales Ayme walked from the Akapana pyramid at the ancient site of Tiwanaku, Bolivia, where he had been blessed by indigenous religious specialists, to the top of the Kalasasaya temple, where he spoke to the tens of thousands of people gathered to see his symbolic investiture as leader of Bolivia and hear him give thanks to “God and Mother Earth” and call for unity. The next day, Morales was inaugurated officially as the first indigenous president of Bolivia, a majority

Fashioning Women in the Third Reich

Irene Guenther

Source: Nazi Chic?. Fashioning Women in the Third Reich 2004

Book chapter

There were random free spaces in the cage of the devil.Quotation Johannes Weyl, chief editor of Das Blatt der Hausfrau and, later, head of Ullstein Verlag’s newspaper department and, then, its chief business director after the Ullstein Verlag was aryanized. Several years after its aryanization, the publishing firm was renamed Deutscher Verlag. Weyl was also on the advisory board of the Deutsches Mode-Institut. Weyl’s quoted observation was made in regards to the publishing industry, but pertains

Revolutionary Relics

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France 2002

Book chapter

In narrating the Revolution, dress figures repeatedly as tangible evidence by means of which to articulate the present’s relation to the past, whether for reasons of celebration and commemoration, or for those of condemnation and denunciation. The preservation of special items of dress as highly charged and cherished souvenirs is a phenomenon that is evident from the earliest days of the Revolution.

Representing Authority: New Forms of Official Identity

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France 2002

Book chapter

The earliest days of the Revolution had seen the creation of the National Guard, an institution whose adoption of a uniform corresponded to the expression of a newly forged patriotic unity. To some extent, this proved to be a relatively uncontentious phenomenon in so far as the creation of a uniform was consistent with the essentially military nature of the Guard. Uniforms were, however, strongly associated with hierarchy. In the case of the Guard, this related to the social status of its members

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