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Helen Storey

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dress for Rites of Passage

Annette Lynch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A rite of passage is a series of ritualized acts moving an individual from one stage of life to another, a formal and public marking of changing status and position within society. Rituals are repeated patterned actions that serve to reinforce and publicly announce beliefs and values to both the participating initiate and a culturally aware audience. Dress as a visible sign of social position is very often used within rites of passage as a public symbol of changing identity, and a means of expres

Birth, Marriage, and Death

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Important rites of passage relate to dress in Southwest Asia; namely, engagement, marriage, birth, and death customs. Because of the region’s size and the many different ethnic and religious groups and numerous variations, only general descriptions are possible. In the West, the sequence of life events is usually listed as birth, marriage, and death. In contrast, among many Southwest Asian cultures, birth is regarded as a product of marriage; thus marriage, birth, and death is considered the “nat

Epilogue

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

The Post-Mao Fashion Revival

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

The Cultural Revolution was a period marked by turmoil, repression, and violence in every facet of Chinese life. Answering Mao Zedong’s call for a sweeping, revolutionary campaign that would give birth to a new China, millions of young Chinese joined the Red Guard, a mass movement that shattered the existing order in an attempt to stamp out everything that was old, feudal, or foreign. Mao and the Red Guard closed the schools and denounced teachers and intellectuals as impediments to the revolutio

The Spread of Fashion through Mass Media

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

When the television set first came to China in 1958, locally produced black-and-white TV models were available only to high-ranking government officials. For the next two decades, television remained an expensive luxury item far beyond the meager means of most Chinese. For example, in the mid-1970s an eleven-inch set cost seven hundred yuan while the average monthly income in Shanghai was only twenty-seven yuan.JonathanD.Spence, The Search for Modern China (New York: Norton, 1991), 672. In additi

From Asexual to Unisex

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

Throughout China’s imperial history the role of women in society had always been one of distinct subservience to men in accordance with Confucian teachings. In the Confucian system the role of women was defined and governed by the “three submissions” (daughter to father, wife to husband, and widow to son) and the “four virtues” (morality, appearance, speech, and domestic skills). The roles, behaviors, and appearances of women that these encompassed were defined, interpreted, and judged by men. It

Fashion in Print

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

As early as 1979, Zhongguo qingnian (China Youth) published a number of articles that attempted to reconcile the seemingly fundamental conflict between the state’s proletarian ideology and the nature of fashion. The articles published in China Youth generally adopted a pro-fashion viewpoint, as evinced in “Is Caring for Dress Capitalist?” “Discussing Guidance—Starting From Youth Hairstyles and Trouser Legs,” “What Is the Beauty of Dress?” and “To Adorn Oneself More Beautifully” in 1980; “One Shou

Importing Fashion Icons

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

Pop music has always been a close cousin of fashion: Elvis, the Beatles, Madonna, Cher, Jennifer Lopez, along with scores of other rock and pop stars have both influenced and been influenced by the world of fashion. This is no less true in Asia than it is in the West, but in China in particular the influence of pop stars on Chinese dress is a more recent phenomenon—and a phenomenon that only took hold once the music itself ceased to be politically controversial.

Reinvented Identity: The Qipao and Tang-Style Jacket

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

Dressing had always played a critical role in marking ranks and classes in the strict hierarchical system of imperial China. What Chinese men, in particular, wore had always been of great political importance. Throughout Chinese history, transitions between Chinese dynasties were always accompanied by a transformation in dress. And when Manchu nomads, an ethnic minority living to the northeast of the Great Wall, conquered China and established the Qing dynasty in 1644, they forced all Han Chinese

The Evolution of the Fashion Industry: Designers and Models

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

Prior to the economic reforms launched in 1978, the garments of most urbanites (and of nearly all rural residents) were made either at home or in small tailor shops, either by hand or on home sewing machines. Home sewing machines were introduced to China in the 1920s and industrial models appeared in the 1960s, but it was not until after the economic reforms of the late 70s that the Chinese ready-to-wear industry started to cater to the needs of the masses.HuZongxiao and LuLu, “Fuzhuang hangye de

Importing Dreams of Luxury: Western Brand Names

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Chinese Fashion. From Mao to Now 2009

Book chapter

We are finished here in the West—our moment has come and gone. This is all about China and India and Russia. It is the beginning of the reawakening of cultures that have historically worshipped luxury and haven’t had it for so long.DanaThomas, Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster (New York: Penguin Press, 2007), 300.

The Peloponnesian “Zonari”: A Twentieth-century String Skirt

Linda Welters

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

Barber considers the string skirt “among the first garments ever depicted on human beings” (see Chapter 2, this volume: 21). These string skirts are belts or bands that incorporate long unwoven strings, fringes or tassels. Archaeological evidence indicates that they existed in Europe as far back as the Palaeolithic era. The earliest evidence for these skirts is from the Gravettian culture of southern Europe (26,000–20,000 BC). The so-called Venus figures from this culture wear belts or bands arou

Protection From Harm: The Shawl and Cap in Czech and Slovak Wedding, Birthing and Funerary Rites

Patricia Williams

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

Archaeological finds suggest that ritual acts accompanied burial since early times. The presence of ritual attracted the attention of scholars, and in 1908 Arnold van Gennep presented the first substantial interpretation of such acts. Van Gennep (1960 [1908]: 10) called these ceremonies rites of passage, and described them as the “magico-religious” aspects of crossing frontiers associated with life changes. According to van Gennep, the more technically simple the society, the more often the holy

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