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The Movement of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

We have likened the movement of fashion to the movement of a river. As dress historian James Laver, James,Laver said, in comparing the fashion cycle to a force of nature, “Nothing seems to be able to turn it back until it has spent itself, until it has provoked a reaction by its very excess.”JamesLaver, Taste and Fashion, rev. ed. (London: George G. Harrop, 1946), p. 52. However, just as a river can swell to turbulent flood stage or be slowed or diverted by a dam, so the movement of fashion can b

Feminist Ideologies in Postmodern Japanese Fashion: Rei Kawakubo Meets Marie Antoinette in Downtown Tokyo

Ory Bartal

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the 1970s, the modernistic social paradigm collapsed in many post-industrial countries. In Japan, it resulted in the falling apart of the homogeneous culture that hailed collectivism. Various groups began to form. In 1970s Tokyo, the Karasu-Zoku (raven tribe) emerged as a parallel to the British Punk movement. Alongside the karasu-zoku was the an-non-zoku, a young and fashionable “tribe” consisting of women who enjoyed reading the mass communicationmagazinesmagazines an-an and non-no. The idea

Mannequins and Mannequin Alternatives

Judy Bell and Kate Ternus

Source: Silent Selling. Best Practices and Effective Strategies in Visual Merchandising, 5th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The mannequin is regarded as one of the fashion retailer’s most powerful communication tools. Used strategically, it speaks volumes about fashion trends and a store’s brand identity. We know that in order to communicate effectively, a store mannequin must relate to a shopper’s self-image. When shoppers follow current fashion—read about it, talk about it, look at it, buy it, and wear it—they are defining self and describing who they are through the clothing they wear. In fact, more than one indust

Dress and Body Image

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As you learned in Chapter 6, “Dress and Physical Appearance,” the body is a very important vehicle in the public presentation of oneself to others. We make assessments of others on the basis of body characteristics and configurations, we categorize others (often unknowingly) based on their body size, color, attractiveness, or other physical features, and we often make evaluations and judgments about their worth (real or imagined) once we have assessed and categorized them. The previous chapter we

Dress and Personality

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” we noted that why you look the way you do and the choices that you make to dress your body and thereby modify your appearance is a result of three major influences: the culture and environment that you are living in, the social groups that you participate in, and the combination of individual characteristics that make you a unique individual. In this chapter, we focus our discussion on an individual characteristic, the psychological concept of personality, and how

Dress and the Self

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

How do you think about yourself on an individual basis? You may have ideas about yourself as a physical being. For example, you may like your weight but not your skin. You may love your hair but not your nails. You may also have ideas about yourself as a dressed being. How do you look in jeans? In a uniform? With your hair colored? You may also have ideas about your inner personality.Relationships between dress and personality as discussed in Chapter 8. What type of person am I? What do you belie

Dress and Identity

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 9, “Dress and the Self “ we said that the self is a dynamic interactive system of beliefs, feelings, and motives that characterize you as an individual. But because humans are complex, our selves are multi-dimensional. In the mornings you attend classes (i.e., you are a student), on weekends you play basketball with other members of your team (i.e., you are an athlete). To acknowledge this diversity, we say that the self is composed of several identities. It is important to understand

Dress and Socialization

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Key to the understanding of a society is the concept of social position. You will recall from Chapter 10, “Dress and Identity,” that every society, regardless of its size, is comprised of a set of social positions. For example, typically there are individuals who formally or informally lead the members of the society (e.g., Presidents, chiefs, executives) and those who follow (e.g., citizens, members, employees). This example has two simple social positions: Leader and follower.

Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ “Macaroni” Prints

Peter Mcneil

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Painted caricatures began on the “Grand TourGrand Tour” as private jokes shared between young men and their tutors. Private Italian painters working in Florence inspired the English development of this field. Etchings were made by Pier Leone Ghezzi (1674–1755) and Pietro Longhi (1702–85), and painted in Rome by English artists including Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Patch (1725–82). Horace Walpole wrote in his journal thus: “Patch was excellent in Caricatura, and was in much favour with the youn

Military Dress as an Ideological Marker in Roman Palestine

Guy D. Stiebel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Only a few instances from the Roman Empire actually provide scholars with near-complete assemblages of panoplies, and most rare of all are the remains that derived directly from conflict lands. In addition to the celebrated navy soldier from ce79 Herculaneum,R. Gore, “2000 Years of Silence: The Dead Do Tell Tales at Vesuvius,” National Geographic, 165 (1984), pp. 557–613; S. Ortisi “Pompeji und Herculaneum—Soldaten in den Vesuvsdäten,” Archäologie der Schlachtfelder—Militaria aus Zerstörungshoriz

The Movement of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashion is, in many ways, like a river. A river is always in motion, continuously flowing—sometimes it is slow and gentle; other times it is rushed and turbulent. It is exciting and never the same. It affects those who ride its currents and those who rest on its shores. Its movements depend on the environment.

Identity, role and the Mask

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The function of a costume or mask is to “disguisedisguise, protect or transform” (Wilsher, 2007, p. 12). For superheroes, the mask serves all three of these functions. It identity constructionreligiontransforms the wearer from ordinary civilian to superhero, disguising him in order to protect the identity of his alter ego, and those he cares about. The duality of the superhero’s identity is bound up in his costume. His public face, the mask, conceals his private face, hidden underneath.

Evolution and Adaptation: Form versus function

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Superheroes are immediately identified as extraordinary by their costumes. These costumes are, in contrast to the civilian clothing of their alter ego, colorful, bold, figure-hugging, and often seemingly impractical. At first glance, they may print (comics)accuracyappear ludicrous, but their origins reveal aspects of these costumes to be both necessary and plausible.

Wearing the flag: Patriotism and Globalization

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Captain AmericaCaptain America was created as a defender of the values of the United States of America. His appearance resembles those of Olympians, for whom national allegiance becomes the defining factor in the design of their uniforms. When they inject Steve Rogers with a serum to give him super-powers, the American secret service intend that his supernatural athleticismathleticism will be used in combat, on behalf of the US Army. He is dressed in a flag-like costume, and introduced to the wor

Dressing up, dressing down: A spectacle of otherness, and the ordinariness of the civilian alter-ego

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

™ and © DC Comics

Channeling the Beast

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

physiognomyImages depicting animals with human characteristics, and hybrid animal-human beasts, were a staple of ancient religion and mythology. Sometimes, they were deities, like Bastet, the feline goddess of Ancient Egypt, and at other times they were the monstrous product of animal/human coupling, like ancient Crete’s Minotaur. These historical animal-human hybrids had a special power and allure. The duality of this fusion of “human and the non-human” can be frightening, or at least unsettling

Superhero cosplay

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

re-enactmentThe notion of a fan has moved beyond “older ideas of media spectatorship” that involve little more than direct consumption of a cultural artifact (Flemming, 2007, p. 16). participatory fandomParticipatory fandom involves tangential activities which expand upon the fictional world and blur boundaries with reality. “Fans create a fan culture with its own systems of production and distribution that forms . . . a ‘shadow cultural economy’ that lies outside that of the cultural industries

Thirteen: Conclusion: Fashioning Future Brands

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Future fashions will create an individualistic perception of each company and its branding techniques for every single consumer. The success of fashion branding will depend on the industry’s ability to reflect individuals’ styles, making them feel unique. The landmark article “Fashioning Future Fashions,” by scholar Gwendolyn O’Neal, notes that fashions (including all body modifications and extensions, such as tattoos and piercings) are restricted and prechosen for individuals by cultural gatekee

Using the Elements and Principles of Design in Apparel Design and Style Selection

Elizabeth Liechty, Judith Rasband and Della Pottberg-Steineckert

Source: Fitting & Pattern Alteration. A Multi-Method Approach to The Art of Style Selection, Fitting, and Alteration, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Viewer attention automatically goes to contrast in shape, color, line, texture, or pattern—to what therefore appears dominant on the body or the garment.

Alternative Methods of Figure Evaluation and Style Selection

Elizabeth Liechty, Judith Rasband and Della Pottberg-Steineckert

Source: Fitting & Pattern Alteration. A Multi-Method Approach to The Art of Style Selection, Fitting, and Alteration, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Everyone has issues with their bodies. Everything we have ever heard, read, or experienced about our appearance throughout life contributes to the mental perception we have of our bodies. That perception is called “body image.”

Modernity—an onslaught on the eyes

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

emotiondandyBefore the twentieth century, sunglasses as we think of them today were not in any kind of widespread use. Tinted glass (green or blue) had been recommended since the eighteenth century—but for correctivespectaclesspectacles (Ayscough in Drewry 1994) intended to be worn indoors. Mid-eighteenth century Venice saw green tinted glasses used against glare from the water (the “Goldoni” type, worn by and named after the leader of the commedia dell’ arte). At the turn of the nineteenth centu

Seeing the blur—perception, cool, and mechanized speed (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

speedindustrialised consciousness; panoramic perception; Virilio, PaulAlthough the now-ubiquitous image of bikini, shades, and sun-lounger might suggest that the ideal wearer of sunglasses enjoys the luxury of being blissfully inert, the dynamic power, excess, and seductive glamor of men and women speeding along in shades is undeniable—from the tough sheen of Marlon Brando in The Wild Ones to twenty-first century pop acts like Britney SpearsBritney Spears in “Toxic,” where impenetrable diamond-st

Seeing the cyborg—eye-shading, cool, and the hi-tech body (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Exploring speed in the last chapter has already enabled us to consider some aspects of the relationship between sunglasses and modern technologytechnology. But this relationship goes further. Sunglasses became a more general sign of encounters with the wonders and perils of modern technology; in the early days of TV advertising, sunglasses were worn by immaculate, 1950s housewives shading their eyes from the terrifying brilliance of whites achieved with innovative washing powders.

Seeing in the light—“sun”glasses, modern glamor, cool, and celebrity (1920s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Today, a more general sense that sunglasses protect our eyes from sunlight dominates. After all, the name finally settled on for all kinds of motor goggles, protective spectacles, autoglasses, and so on was (and is) sunglasses, conjuring up countless images of those bikini-clad women and casual, white linen-clad men basking in the glow of their own attractiveness, their sunglasses bouncing back that gold-colored light of happiness and success. Smiling or not, these men and women are embodiments o

Heading for the shade—the spread of outsider cool (1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

outsiderSunglasses were tactically used by people who were “outside” the goals and means of dominant society, as part of an articulation of a dissonant style which held an attraction just as great as that of those sunny images of “straight” success and leisure. This chapter will show how the more complex connotations of “outsider cool” became desirable and were appropriated by the “mainstream” in the 1950s and 1960s and beyond. Sunglasses could act as a sign of a “bettered self”—but they also sta

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