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Color and Texture

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

colorphysical and psychological reactions tocolor psychologyColor psychology is very important in visual merchandising. Many theories have been espoused concerning the effects of color on people and their moods while shopping. Color can immediately create a mood. Most of us have colors that tend to cheer us up when we are feeling down and colors that calm us. Each of us also has colors that can make us physically feel hotter or cooler. The problem for the visual merchandiser is that each person m

Social and cultural influences

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

long--term forecastingFashion forecasters project long-term social and cultural shifts, population trends, technological advances, demographicsdemographic movement, and developments in consumer behaviorconsumer behavior in long-term forecasting, future studies, or macro trendsmacro trends. A macro trend is a large-scale, continuous shift in consumer interest.

Color

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Color forecasting is a process of gathering, evaluating, understanding, and interpreting information to be able to predict the colors that will be desirable for the consumer in the upcoming seasons. Forecasters do this by researching and using their creativity, intuition, and experience to sense color shifts. Given the fact that consumers are greatly influenced by color, a forecaster needs to understand the allure that color creates. Forecasting of color is done in many different segments of the

The Environment of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Both manufacturers and retailers try to identify and select Target market,target markets for their goods. Target markets are specific groups of potential customers that a business is attempting to turn into regular customers. Businesses attempt to determine who their customers are, what those customers want, how much the customers are willing to pay for goods, where potential customers are located, and how many targeted customers there are.

The Rise of the Hyperconnected Consumer

Wendy K. Bendoni

Source: Social Media For Fashion Marketing. Storytelling in a Digital World, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

With over three billion Internet users and two billion social media users, it is no wonder that there is a shift in the behavior of consumers with the connected world around them (Kemp, 2015). Consumers continue to embrace these connections at accelerated rates through the adoption of mobile applications, social media communities, and the Internet itself. In this chapter, we will investigate these new connected consumers to see how they have adopted digital/social networks as part of their everyd

Why Study Dress?

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress is one of the most interesting aspects of human behavior we can study. Everyone in the world “dresses” their body. Dress has long been a means to communicate information about the self to others, to express the self creatively, and to protect the self from physical and psychological harm.

Why Study Dress?

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In our daily lives, we often find ourselves in situations in which we have to assess others or make judgments about them, sometimes based on very little information. Those judgments have very powerful consequences. For example, jurors may make judgments concerning guilt or innocence based not only on defendant testimony but also on defendant demeanor and appearance. Recruiters may use physical appearance cues as they make their hiring decisions because new college graduates often have very simila

Dress and Impression Formation

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, we continue with the same general topic of social cognition. In Chapter 4, “Dress and Social Cognition” we introduced the concept of impression formation. In this chapter we expand our discussion on impression formation to include attribution, Implicit Personality Theory, impression management, and dramaturgy. We also include a discussion of role theory as it relates to social perception, look at the rise and fall in popularity of casual business dress, examine some of the behavi

Dress and Physical Appearance

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter we discuss aspects of our physical selves and dress. Two particular aspects of our physical selves affect our own and others’ perceptions of us; these two aspects are our faces and our bodies (shape or size) and both contribute to attractiveness. We will see that our faces and bodies also affect others’ behavior toward us, as well as our own behavior toward ourselves and toward others. Faces and bodies are stimuli in social cognition, or how we think, perceive, judge, and make inf

Dress and Body Image

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As you learned in Chapter 6, “Dress and Physical Appearance,” the body is a very important vehicle in the public presentation of oneself to others. We make assessments of others on the basis of body characteristics and configurations, we categorize others (often unknowingly) based on their body size, color, attractiveness, or other physical features, and we often make evaluations and judgments about their worth (real or imagined) once we have assessed and categorized them. The previous chapter we

Dress and Personality

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” we noted that why you look the way you do and the choices that you make to dress your body and thereby modify your appearance is a result of three major influences: the culture and environment that you are living in, the social groups that you participate in, and the combination of individual characteristics that make you a unique individual. In this chapter, we focus our discussion on an individual characteristic, the psychological concept of personality, and how

Dress and the Self

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

How do you think about yourself on an individual basis? You may have ideas about yourself as a physical being. For example, you may like your weight but not your skin. You may love your hair but not your nails. You may also have ideas about yourself as a dressed being. How do you look in jeans? In a uniform? With your hair colored? You may also have ideas about your inner personality.Relationships between dress and personality as discussed in Chapter 8. What type of person am I? What do you belie

Fashion in Balzac’s Paris

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

La toilette est l’expression de la société.

The Environment of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A cardinal rule in any business is “know your customer.” This rule is especially true in the fashion business. Accurate facts about customers that are properly interpreted help designers, manufacturers, and retailers make major decisions about what to offer those customers. Guesswork and misinterpreted facts can lead to major business failures.

The Creative Process In Promotion

Kristen K. Swanson and Judith C. Everett

Source: Promotion In The Merchandising Environment, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“When I started, the only enclosed office was mine. I spent the first half of my first day feeling removed…. It eliminates the creativity.”

Introduction

Karl Aspelund

Source: The Design Process, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

We are surrounded by design. As I sit here at my computer, I can consider the design of its casing and the user interface of the software. I can also consider the design of my clothes. The keyboard, my teacup, the phone, the graphics on a book cover, my backpack, and the window frame are all designed; even my daughter's rock collection on the windowsill has been designed. Each rock has been chosen on the beach as a candidate for the collection and then intentionally placed on the windowsill as de

Stage 1: Inspiration

Karl Aspelund

Source: The Design Process, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Our journey on the road from the World of Imagination to the World of Objects must begin at Inspiration. In any creative act, there must be a force that drives the creator and infuses the created object with energy. A designer's motivation for working on a project must be strong enough to produce the best possible end result. The creative energy going into the design should be clearly visible in the final product.

Stage 3: Conceptualization

Karl Aspelund

Source: The Design Process, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Once you identify the design problem, you are ready to examine methods for conceptualizing your ideas to come up with a solution. You examine the nature of a design concept and how using intuition and metaphor helps you create a coherent presentation. This requires you to develop a thought structure that uses known elemental images to explain the unknown and unseen. Finally, the chapter establishes the need for you to present your concept to the various audiences involved in a clear and organized

The Principles of Design

Karl Aspelund

Source: Designing. An Introduction, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designers Speak

Researching and Planning for Designs

Karl Aspelund

Source: Designing. An Introduction, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designers Speak

Time and Experience: Design and Culture/Design in Culture

Karl Aspelund

Source: Designing. An Introduction, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designers Speak

Inside-Out: Outsider Artists Go Inside

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The term ‘Outsider Art’ was coined in 1972 (a year after the ‘birth’ of Contemporary Aboriginal, Aboriginal artAboriginal art) by the English art critic Roger Cardinal, RogerCardinal as an umbrella term to describe the art produced by those not associated with, admitted to or educated by the art scene, denoting usually the insane, but also the parochial ingenue. ‘Outsider Art’ also incorporates the ‘Art BrutArt Brut’ of French postwar artist Jean Dubuffet, JeanDubuffet, and folk art as part of it

Dress Theory, Fashion and A Jazz Aesthetic

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

influence(s)between jazz/fashionmusiciansuse of clothingfashion designersincorporating meaningclothingas act of meaningFashion and jazz are disciplines that have significantly influenced one another in the first half of the twentieth century. Aesthetics, aestheticsdefineddefined as “the identification of the beautiful” (Weiner 2012: 8), were generated, shared and communicated through a merger of visual, behavioral and acoustic qualities among performers. In Cultural PassionsCultural Passions, Eli

The Handbag from the 1970s to 2000

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The need to collect, carry, and contain one’s belongings has existed for as long as humanity. From sacks to hold prehistoric flint and pouches for early coins to purses with contemporary cosmetics, various types of handbags have appeared in art and writing throughout history. While always fulfilling a practical function, handbags have also evolved with changing needs. They can be signifiers of fashion, social status, and even psychological state, as they mediate the boundaries between interior an

How Fashion Consumers Perceive, Learn, and Remember

Patricia Mink Rath, Stefani Bay, Richard Petrizzi and Penny Gill

Source: The Why Of The Buy. Consumer Behavior and Fashion Marketing, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As noted earlier, we receive stimuli through our five senses: vision, touch, smell, hearing, and taste. Let's consider each and the role each plays in the world of fashion and design.

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