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Superhero cosplay

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

re-enactmentThe notion of a fan has moved beyond “older ideas of media spectatorship” that involve little more than direct consumption of a cultural artifact (Flemming, 2007, p. 16). participatory fandomParticipatory fandom involves tangential activities which expand upon the fictional world and blur boundaries with reality. “Fans create a fan culture with its own systems of production and distribution that forms . . . a ‘shadow cultural economy’ that lies outside that of the cultural industries

Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

All Out in the Wash: Convict Stain Removal in the Narryna Heritage Museum’s Dress Collection

Jennifer Clynk and Sharon Peoples

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This study extends historian Stefan Petrow’s 2009 study of the convict stain and Narryna by suggesting ways in which its effects can be overcome or reinterpreted, especially in relation to dress. The metaphor of the convict stain relates to a social stigma dating from the 1840s, when anti-transportationists in VDL began a fierce political and moral campaign against convict transportation to the colony. The stain metaphor was a nineteenth-century term applied by historians from the 1850s through t

Vintage: Fashioning Time

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

vintage clothesAn early usage of the word vintage in the context of clothing can be found in American Vogue (magazine)Vogue. In the rubric “Smart Fashions for Limited Incomes” in the September 1913 issue, the writer offers “Several Ruses for Disguising the Vintage of Last Year’s Wardrobe,” to make an up-to-date appearance with clothes that survive from past seasons. This includes hands-on advice on updating the “tailoringtailor suit of last year’s vintage” with a “new, upsloping belt” so the suit

A Stylish History of Jazz: 1900–1960

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

jazzorigins ofNew Orleansslave performancesBechet, Sidneyon slave performances/New Orleansartinfluence of AfricanAfrican ritualsAfrican art/dressDecades before the Civil War, a gathering of inspired people seeking self-determination initiated the birth of a musical genre that flourished throughout America. Congo SquareCongo Square in New Orleans, Louisiana is the highly renowned ground where slaves gathered for spiritual communion on free Sunday. By 1800, these assemblies swelled to six hundred i

Assessing Elitism and Branding in Jazz

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

societal opposition, to jazzNew Orleansand jazzEarly on, jazz experienced modes of disdain, streaming from religious institutions, black societies and majority tradition. This conflict commenced with the intersection of gospel and secular musicsecular music. The latter was associated with music performed in saloons, nightclubs and theaters. Around the early 1900s, Du Bois, W. E. B.Du Bois explained the magnitude of segregationand the churchthe church in black communities, and the churchchurchand

Gendered Identities, Ideologies and Cultural Difference

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

sheet music coversfunctions ofperformersmarketing song titlesmusic production systemmusic industrymass-marketsmarketingby performerscommercialization, of jazzPrior to the 1920s dominance of phonograph records and radio, a dominant American aesthetic was disseminated into households via illustrated sheet music covers. These booklets contained descriptive cover art, music, lyrics, dance instructions and photographs, publicityphotographs of performers that stimulated popular interest in songwriters,

Narcotics and Jazz: A Fashionable Addiction

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

There has been a narrative of narcotics in American popular culture. Narcotics are one of the five classes of drugs regulated by the Controlled Substances Act (CSA)Controlled Substances Act (CSA) in the United States. Classified as a Schedule I substance under the CSA, 21 U.S.C. § 812, heroin has “a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision” (Drug Enforcement Administration 2012a).

Philadelphia Nightlife, Nostalgia and Popular Culture

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

vaudeville entertainmentsminstrel entertainmentAlthough New Orleans, New York and Chicago flourished with neighborhoods of jazz including Storyville, Harlem and the South Side correspondingly, Philadelphia, jazz cityPhiladelphia is a setting where innovators and establishments shaped a noteworthy history. The documentation of entertainment outlets was evidenced at the end of the first decade. From 1910 to 1919, society, political and religious groups promoted balls, dances and concerts via the Ph

Branding and Logos

Jennifer Grayer Moore

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Making the brand name or logo of a company a visible and often dominant design feature in a piece of apparel or on an accessory became a defining feature in fashion in the latter part of the twentieth century, especially from 1970 onward. Icons, initials, full names of designers or design houses, and often a combination of two of the aforementioned were woven, printed, embroidered, stamped, and engraved into every conceivable type of material, sometimes as a single motif and often in endless repe

The Handbag from the 1970s to 2000

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The need to collect, carry, and contain one’s belongings has existed for as long as humanity. From sacks to hold prehistoric flint and pouches for early coins to purses with contemporary cosmetics, various types of handbags have appeared in art and writing throughout history. While always fulfilling a practical function, handbags have also evolved with changing needs. They can be signifiers of fashion, social status, and even psychological state, as they mediate the boundaries between interior an

Statement Jewelry in Contemporary Catwalk Fashion

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Statement jewelry is defined by its role as a communicator of meaning, extending beyond jewelry’s traditional function as a decorative medium in order to express status, culture, and personality. As a “genre” it is characterized by its exaggerated proportions, bold shapes and colors, and its employment of a wide range of materials other than conventional precious metals and gemstones. By focusing on notable examples from 1990s catwalk fashion, this exploration will trace the historical and cultur

Contemporary Fashion Practice in Urban India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

economic liberalization, India’semergence of new public spaces in urban IndiaLast Sunday I visited a nearby water theme park with my family and a family in the neighbourhood. We thoroughly enjoyed the day playing in water and going on scary rides… But always I am confused what dress I should wear in such places. My husband told me to put on a cotton three-fourth pants and tee shirt. I felt very comfortable in the water in that dress... Some orthodox Muslim women were in Burqa and I was wondering

A Brief History of Dress, Difference and Fashion Change in India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

The assumption that the impetus for style change only came about during the presence of the British in India is largely untrue, as is the viewpoint that global interchange and fashion did not exist prior to the influence of contemporary forces of globalization. Indian clothing already included a diverse range of stitched and unstitched garments before European dress was introduced. Many of these had been fashioned by global interactions and local adaptations, stemming from the need to cater to In

Dress and Textiles in Transition: The Sungudi Sari Revival of Tamilnadu, India

Kala Shreen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

What is sungudi? A craftsperson ties a thread around a tiny portion of fabric, knots it tightly and repeats. Once the fabric is dyed and the knots untied, the previously knotted areas will transform into tiny dots (Plate 24. Traditionally sungudi was used for cotton saris. Thousands of such dots decorate a sungudi sari; it contains 20,000 knots on average. Depending on the number of knots tied, a sungudi sari may take seven to fifteen days to make. According to the documents produced by the Gover

The Empress’s Old Clothes: Biographies of African Dress at the Victoria And Albert Museum

Nicola Stylianou

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

On 20 April 1869 the V&A accessioned a number of objects from Ethiopia including clothes and jewellery that were listed in the museum register as having been given to the museum by the ‘Secretary of State for India’ and ‘belonging formerly to the Queen of Abyssinia’ (V&A 1869). At this time the V&A had not yet been divided into departments with objects being accepted for inclusion in the museum on the grounds of design excellence or as demonstrations of particular techniques. Included in this gif

The Art Versus Commerce Debate

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Sedimenting The Youth Market

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Class and Gender in A Museum Collection: Female Skiwear

Marianne Larsson

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Urban middle-class women have been active in open-air activities and sports since the end of the nineteenth century. When men could easily wear a used woolen suit, women had to challenge the fashion of corseted waists and full-length skirts, as well as the conventions that excluded them from physical exercise in public and outside. In this study, I want to show how women’s desire for outdoor life has influenced their ski clothing according to new social and cultural patterns. With a focus on fema

Fashioning Celebrity: Class, Tastemaking and Cultural Intermediaries

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

In her article ‘Bringing out the * in You’, Deborah Jermyn (2006) calls for the substantial revision and re-imagining of traditional paradigms of television fame (Ellis 1992; Langer 1981). Using Sarah Jessica Parker as a case study, she demonstrates the ways in which the development of American ‘quality’ television complicates the longstanding assumption that ‘stardom proper’ is an exclusively ‘cinematic phenomenon’. Deriving from Ellis’s model (outlined in the introduction), it has long since be

Celebrity and Fashion, Past and Present

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

‘Celebrity culture’ in a recognizably modern but still rudimentary form could be said to have emerged in the late eighteenth century. The period witnessed the new scientific discoveries and consequent technological developments associated with the Industrial Revolution. They would transform Western society from a predominantly rural one into one increasingly centred on urban and industrial life. Some of the new technologies also made possible the wide circulation of printed material—newspapers, b

Buying into Fashion: The Social Background

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

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