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Bridal Wear

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The evolution of the bridal gown, and its history, aesthetic, and rituals, are significant within our cultural history and have an influence on the contemporary wedding ceremony. Modern designers continue to be influenced by fashion history, or may reflect current styles and concerns. This article predominantly refers to the white wedding gown worn traditionally in Western Christian cultures, its heritage, and the wedding dress as archival object.

Monique Lhuillier

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1985

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection continued the development of Lagerfeld’s Chanel. Beaded looks were made to look like intricate tapestries and the hems of skirts were either floor-length or well above the knee, a deviation from Chanel’s strict rule of creating skirts 2 in. (5 cm) below the knee, no matter the fashion. The final bridal look was a white satin miniskirt suit. Two-tone, matronly pumps were a Chanel signature; the black stilettos in the collection underscored the younger, sexier direction of the house

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1990

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In this collection, presented in the Champs-Élysées cinema, Karl Lagerfeld introduced the “slope,” a new iteration of the Chanel jacket that featured a narrow-fitting shoulder line. The clothes were influenced by a combination of eighteenth-century robes à la française and the mod 1960s, with open panniers that revealed miniskirts and thigh-high boots. The playfulness of the collection spoke to the young and daring attitude of the new couture customer. For the finale, Lagerfeld presented three br

Versace, Fall/Winter 1997 Couture

Tessa Maffucci

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In July 1997, Gianni Versace presented his final couture collection at the Ritz Hotel in Paris just days before he was murdered. The theme of his final show seemed eerily prescient. Many of the models were dressed in black and several of the pieces were adorned with the motif of a Byzantine cross. Even a wedding look, worn by Naomi Campbell, hinted at feelings of the occult. Yet this final haute couture collection was a continuation of the subjects and details he had explored throughout his entir

White

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“Pure white” may just be the oldest fashion statement of all time, harking back to Biblical angels and the earliest use of linen recorded by Ancient Egyptians some 4,000 years ago. In modern times, virtually every couture fashion house features fantastical visions of brides in white on the catwalk, while any view of streetwear from the 1970s onward could hardly be complete without the ubiquitous white T-shirt. Once, white collars and cuffs may have been the trappings of the landed gentry, but the

Morocco

Cynthia J. Becker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Morocco has long been a crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa, and dress reflects the richness of its history as well as its geographic and cultural diversity. Forty to sixty percent of the Moroccan population is Berber, and many Berbers have retained their indigenous language. After the Phoenicians and then the Romans settled in Morocco and encountered the Berbers, Arabs moved into Morocco in the seventh century, founding the city of Fes and gradually converting the

Overview of Taiwan

Ching-Yi Cheng and Hsu-Chun Su

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The impact of Confucian philosophy on all aspects of Chinese life is evident in the attire of the Han people of Taiwan, specifically as regards the notion of the Doctrine of the Mean, which emphasizes personal introspection and emotional control, focused on cultural nurturing and the rejection of human vanity. Dress preserves modesty by covering the body and obscuring its shape. Importance is placed on inner beauty, the term for which literally means “charm”—the spiritual and cultural quality hop

Tunisia

Meriem Chida

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tunisia lies on the Mediterranean Sea, bordered by Libya and Algeria. The earliest inhabitants, called the Imazighen, spoke Berber languages and predated the Phoenicians, the Romans, the Vandals, the Byzantines, and the Arabs. Until the early seventh century, Imazighen women wore a draped dress like the Greek chiton and the Roman toga, fastened with silver fibulae, with a woolen or leather sash wrapped around the waist. In the seventh century, Arabs brought Islam to Tunisia and influenced local d

Historically-Inspired Bridal Wear from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries

Lydia Edwards

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This article considers the influence of historical styles on bridal wear, a common trend in design from the nineteenth century through to the twenty-first. It considers the extent to which details of historical design have been—and still are—incorporated into wedding dresses and, chiefly, the reasons behind doing so. This will be explored through several examples showing either overt or subtle references to a particular historical timeframe, considering the choice of the bride and the psychology

Overview: Hong Kong

Valery M. Garrett

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Until the late twentieth century the British colony of Hong Kong remained detached from events in China, especially in the rural New Territories. Farmers, wearing traditional dress, grew rice and vegetables, while fishermen sold their catch in local ports. Working people wore hard-wearing, dark clothing suitable to their tough lives. Most wore practical jackets with loose trousers, hemp being a popular fabric. Symbolism is important in Chinese folklore, and children’s clothing was embroidered wit

Bridal Dress in Japan

Ofra Goldstein-Gidoni

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Modern Japanese wear Western-style clothing (yôfuku). Japanese attire (wafuku) that is clearly distinguished from Western attire is worn mainly on ceremonial occasions, especially for life-cycle events such as weddings, funerals, and the coming-of-age ceremony (seijin shiki) celebrated at the age of twenty. Of all these occasions, the wedding ceremony is marked not only with the most elaborate traditional costumes but also with an unparalleled combination of Japanese and Western dress.

Ceremonial and Special-Occasion Dress

Michaele Thurgood Haynes

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

There is a difference between the terms ceremonial and special-occasion dress. The latter is an out-of-the-ordinary event, possibly unique. Societal conventions create parameters as to what is acceptable wear at these times, but personal clothing choices made by the participants help make it a special occasion. Ceremonial refers to repeated events occurring within a set framework, a somewhat rigid and formalized series of actions. In anthropological terms, a ceremony is generally more suitably na

Bridal Dress in Korea

Na Young Hong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Traditional Korean lifestyles began changing with the opening of Korea to the outside world in the late nineteenth century. The first Western wedding in Korea took place in 1890; it took nearly seventy years for most Koreans to accept this style. Traditional ceremonies began giving way to Western-style weddings with the inflow of Western culture into Korea since the mid-1950s. Pyebaek, part of the traditional ceremony in which brides kowtow to the grooms’ intimate elders, remained until the early

The Tradition of the Bridal Trousseau

Sumru Belger Krody

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Central and Southwest Asia, particularly in societies where older traditions are still strongly held, textiles took a prominent place among the gifts that the newly married couple would receive from family and friends. A young bride’s trousseau contained textiles produced for the wedding, such as decorations, hangings, canopies, and dowry-carrying cloths, textiles produced as gifts, and textiles to be used by the couple after the wedding, such as garments for the bride and her husband and text

The Significance of Numbers in Dress

Phyllis Bell Miller

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Throughout history and across various cultures, numbers have played various roles in dress. They may identify a person’s marital status, social standing, economic situation, age, gender, religion, political orientation, and other factors. Numbers related to dress may also protect an individual from evil forces or attract benevolent spirits. In addition, numbers have been used as a tool in textile design since ancient times, allowing the observer to make sense of patterns and motifs. Thus, numbers

Wedding Costume

Michelle Nordtorp-Madson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the global, urbanized standard of wedding apparel has followed the Western tradition of a bride dressed in white or off-white, with a head-covering, whether a veil or head-piece, and carrying flowers, a book, or some other object. The groom is attired in keeping with the degree of formality of the bride. Attendants are generally present, the number, gender, age, and dress of whom being peculiar to each culture. Family members usually atte

North Africa

Fred T. Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North Africa consists of Egypt in the east and the lands to the west, or Maghreb (the Arabic term for “the place of sunset”). Because of a rich archaeological record, a substantial amount of information exists on ancient Egyptian textiles. In ancient Egypt, loincloths and linen kilts with a belt were common items of male clothing, while women wore tight-fitting dresses or skirts. Women’s dresses became looser in the New Kingdom and were decorated with pleats and folds. Both sexes wore woolen cloa

Dress from Kazakhstan

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Kazakhstan is a large Eurasian country in Central Asia; it is ranked as the ninth-largest country in the world, with a territory of about 7,311 square miles (about 12,000 square kilometers). It shares borders with China, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. The name Kazakh derives from an ancient Turkic word meaning “independent” or “a free spirit,” probably as a result of the Kazakhs’ nomadic horseback culture. The ending -stan derives from the Persian word stan meaning “land” or “p

Dress from Kyrgyzstan

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Kyrgyz Republic, or Kyrgyzstan as it is more commonly known, is a country in Central Asia. The name Kyrgyz is said to mean either “forty girls” or “forty tribes” and is a name that probably refers to the epic hero Manas, who unified forty tribes against the Mongols in the medieval period. Kyrgyzstan is a landlocked and mountainous country which has borders with Kazakhstan to the north, Uzbekistan to the west, Tajikistan to the southwest, and China to the east. Since many ethnic groups in the

Birth, Marriage, and Death

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Important rites of passage relate to dress in Southwest Asia; namely, engagement, marriage, birth, and death customs. Because of the region’s size and the many different ethnic and religious groups and numerous variations, only general descriptions are possible. In the West, the sequence of life events is usually listed as birth, marriage, and death. In contrast, among many Southwest Asian cultures, birth is regarded as a product of marriage; thus marriage, birth, and death is considered the “nat

Batik Dress of Java

Maria Wronska-Friend

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Batik—a wax-resist dyeing technique used to produce a range of traditional garments, is a prominent feature of Javanese culture. Each of the major ethnic groups living on the island—Javanese, Sundanese, Chinese, Eurasian, and Arab, used batik textiles as markers of their identity and social status, which resulted in the development of several regional and ethnic styles. At the same time complex iconography, rich symbolic language, and the high accomplishment required to produce many of these text

Bridal Dress in China

Juanjuan Wu

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Bridal dress, coupled with the wedding ceremony, has profound symbolic meanings in Chinese culture. Chinese wedding practices emphasize respect for family lineage and worship of natural elements to reach a desired harmony with social and natural environments. According to Confucius (551–479 b.c.e.), the essential relationship between father and son, as well as emperor and civic officials in Chinese society, stemmed from the more fundamental relationship between husband and wife. From even earlier

Double Dresses for Double Brides

Catherine Harper

Source: Fashion in Fiction. Text and Clothing in Literature, Film, and Television 2009

Book chapter

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