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Feminist Ideologies in Postmodern Japanese Fashion: Rei Kawakubo Meets Marie Antoinette in Downtown Tokyo

Ory Bartal

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

In the 1970s, the modernistic social paradigm collapsed in many post-industrial countries. In Japan, it resulted in the falling apart of the homogeneous culture that hailed collectivism. Various groups began to form. In 1970s Tokyo, the Karasu-Zoku (raven tribe) emerged as a parallel to the British Punk movement. Alongside the karasu-zoku was the an-non-zoku, a young and fashionable “tribe” consisting of women who enjoyed reading the mass communicationmagazinesmagazines an-an and non-no. The idea

Seeing the cyborg—eye-shading, cool, and the hi-tech body (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Exploring speed in the last chapter has already enabled us to consider some aspects of the relationship between sunglasses and modern technologytechnology. But this relationship goes further. Sunglasses became a more general sign of encounters with the wonders and perils of modern technology; in the early days of TV advertising, sunglasses were worn by immaculate, 1950s housewives shading their eyes from the terrifying brilliance of whites achieved with innovative washing powders.

Seeing in the “eclipse”—sunglasses, cool, and the absence of meaning (late 1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Warhol, Andyglamorempty (or hollow) glamorThe light is artificial and mirrors are provided, but not windows, because the characters must be protected from bleak, bruising reality.

Sunglasses and cool—conclusions

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Before sunglasses, certain modernitychangechanges were taking place which created an environment in which they could become functionally and symbolically useful. The city, as an exemplar of modern life, was a place of new opportunities for display, self-fashioning, and casual voyeurism, as well as new levels of sensory and psychological stimulation which threatened to swamp the individual, and from which some kind of protection was required. This initially came in the form of a “blasé attitude,”

Kate Moss

Karen de Perthuis

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Kate Moss is one of the world’s most photographed women, a blank slate for contemporary dreams and desires. With a career spanning three decades, she is a rare enduring phenomenon in an industry defined by ephemerality and a brutal quest for novelty. In the summer of 1988, she was fourteen when spotted by model agent Sarah Doukas at JFK airport—a bored teenager from the London suburb of Croydon with almond eyes, cupid-bow lips, and “God-given bone structure.” She would soon become a fashion model

Introduction

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

And now the art world has become so big and stars seem to come and go as swiftly as reality television characters in Hollywood …

What is Fashionable Art?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

the erosion of the older distinction between high culture and so-called mass or popular culture. This is perhaps the most distressing development of all from the academic standpoint, which has traditionally had a vested interest in preserving a realm of high, or elite culture against the surrounding environment of philistinism, of schlock, and kitschkitsch, of TV series and Reader’s DigestReader’s Digest culture, and in transmitting difficult and complex skills of reading, listening and seeing to

Come Fly With Me: Participatory Art, Interactivity And Audience Involvement

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

interactivityinteractivityparticipatory artaudience involvementrelational aestheticsRelational Aesthetics is also when a successful artist, um, who is too busy touring the globe going from biennial to biennial, and they have no time to make physical art objects any more, so the famous artist uses the attendees at the exhibition as the artwork in some way, you know what I’m saying, like to explore the social relationships between people and y’know this kind of practice is really good when you’re a

Conclusion: Fashionable Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Ethnicity and the Catwalk

Melissa Marra-Alvarez

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion models possess an enduring appeal that impacts on both the world of fashion and society in general. Consequently, the lack of diversity on the catwalk in recent years has come to the fore of popular conscience. Some fashion scholars have argued that modeling practices may serve to shape our understanding and ways of seeing identity, including those based on ethnicity. Focusing on the latter half of the twentieth century, the emergence of “ethnic” models in fashion is described, examining

Boy’s Elegance: A Liminality of Boyish Charm and Old-World Suavity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

T-shirts with voluminous scarves are now in store . . . the big scarf looks lovely!Milkboy Staff’s Blog, 2013, available at http://ameblo.jp/mb-staff/page-67.html#main [accessed 7 October 2013]. The texts are translated by Masafumi Monden.

Lost in A Gaze: Young Men and Fashion in Contemporary Japan

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘Do you understand muslins, sir?’JaneAusten, Northanger Abbey (London: Penguin Books, 1996 [1818]), p. 22.

Introducing Japanese Fashion, Past and Present

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

Culture refers to behaviour and beliefs that are learned and shared: learned so it is not ‘instinctual’ and shared so it is not individual. Sharing refers to social sharing but there is no limitation as to the boundaries of this sociality. No territorial or historical boundaries are implied as part of the definition. This Wilson, Elizabeththe ‘format’ and ‘product’ theoryunderstanding of culture is open-ended. Leaning is always ongoing as a function of changing circumstances and therefore culture

Darzi to “Designer”: Crafting Couture and High-Fashion for India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

Over the past 20 years, the field of fashion in India has changed significantly. We see a shift from an industry that solely supported Western markets through exports, to an fashion design, Indianas a cultural activityfashion design, Indianindustry’s estimate worth (in 2012)fashion design, Indiankey distinguishing factorsfashion weeks, IndianFDCI (Fashion Design Council of India)industry that has begun to take Indian consumers, their tastes and their potential market base into consideration. Indi

Introduction: Indian Fashion

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

While conducting research on the subject of fashion and dressdress it is not uncommon to come across significant variations in the way clothing terminology is applied and understood. Hence providing a framework of terms and definitions used throughout this book is a crucial starting point for this chapter. Outlining certain dress and fashion-related terms and their meanings, like costumecostume and traditional [dress], is also necessary as they have frequently been employed [historically] in acad

Contemporary Fashion Practice in Urban India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

economic liberalization, India’semergence of new public spaces in urban IndiaLast Sunday I visited a nearby water theme park with my family and a family in the neighbourhood. We thoroughly enjoyed the day playing in water and going on scary rides… But always I am confused what dress I should wear in such places. My husband told me to put on a cotton three-fourth pants and tee shirt. I felt very comfortable in the water in that dress... Some orthodox Muslim women were in Burqa and I was wondering

A Brief History of Dress, Difference and Fashion Change in India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

The assumption that the impetus for style change only came about during the presence of the British in India is largely untrue, as is the viewpoint that global interchange and fashion did not exist prior to the influence of contemporary forces of globalization. Indian clothing already included a diverse range of stitched and unstitched garments before European dress was introduced. Many of these had been fashioned by global interactions and local adaptations, stemming from the need to cater to In

Dress and Textiles in Transition: The Sungudi Sari Revival of Tamilnadu, India

Kala Shreen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

What is sungudi? A craftsperson ties a thread around a tiny portion of fabric, knots it tightly and repeats. Once the fabric is dyed and the knots untied, the previously knotted areas will transform into tiny dots (Plate 24. Traditionally sungudi was used for cotton saris. Thousands of such dots decorate a sungudi sari; it contains 20,000 knots on average. Depending on the number of knots tied, a sungudi sari may take seven to fifteen days to make. According to the documents produced by the Gover

Adrienne Vittadini

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Contemporary Fashion History in Museums

Marco Pecorari

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

As Alexandra Palmer, AlexandraPalmer argues, the continuous proliferation of alternative forms of exhibiting dress in connection with some specific economic and practical museological reasons brought many fashion museums to favor the exhibition of contemporary dress (Palmer 2008: 36). Such a turn from historical dress to contemporary dress brought diverse fashion museums to dismiss the important tradition of dress history while, at the same time, simplifying the current discussion on fashion hist

Gay Men’s Style: From Macaroni to Metrosexual

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

The term for the particular form of male style from the late eighteenth century, macaroni (or maccaroni), did in fact come from eating pasta (the Greek makaria literally means ‘food made from barley’), which had become fashionable in the 1760s through men who had returned to England after exploring the European continent, especially Italy, on the Grand Tour. Macaronis typically took pains to announce their difference in outlandish examples of foreign clothing that was either foreign—French and It

A Brief History of the Purse up to 1930

Kathleen Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Purses, or handbags, have been a key component of a woman’s wardrobe for much of the 20th century and into the 21st. In recent years, handbags have evolved from chic accessories for carrying personal items to status symbols that may cost thousands of dollars. However, the first known purses developed centuries ago with different objectives in mind. The transformation of the form and function of the purse from ancient times through the 1920s reflects broad currents in social history, including the

Moldova

Jennifer Renea Cash

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of dress in Moldova requires a brief historical introduction. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Moldova refers to the Republic of Moldova, which in its turn is best understood by distinguishing two subregions: Bessarabia and Transnistria. The ethnic majority in both regions is Moldovan (that is, Romanian), and many customs and traditions, including those related to dress and adornment, are shared between the two regions. Nevertheless, the political history of the regions w

Archaeological Evidence: China and Inner Asia

Zhao Feng and Kuang Yanghua

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

During the twentieth century, archaeological finds relating to dress have been recovered in large quantities in China. While some of the garments were made specifically as grave goods, most, it is assumed, are garments used in life to celebrate status and position. These include figures in wood, pottery, jade, and stone, as well as depictions of human figures in murals, paintings, and embroideries.

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