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Striptease

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Striptease is a public performance of the otherwise private act of undressing. It is characterized by its emphasis on clothes, rather than the body beneath. As a demonstration of transformation, striptease highlights the capacity for clothes to conceal and reveal what lies beneath, be it a naked body or another layer of cloth. Catwalk shows make regular use of elements of striptease, layering garments so that ensembles can be revealed piece by piece. More overt references to erotic striptease are

Islamic Style

Magdalena Crăciun

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion designers have found inspiration in past and present sartorial repertoires. Islamically appropriate forms of covered dress have aesthetically been drawn upon as well. Consequently, headscarves, face veils and head-to-toe outerwear have occasionally appeared on the catwalk. Fashion commentators have pointed out that such creations and assemblages referenced ethic, traditional, historical, exotic or oriental dress, and only rarely labelled their source of inspiration as Islamic style. The n

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Burqini

Heather Marie Akou

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The burqini is a full-body swimsuit that combines the terms burqa and bikini. Aheda Zanetti, an Australian designer of Lebanese descent, created the burqini in 2006 as an alternative form of dress for Muslim women serving as lifeguards in Australia. Within months it became available to the general public worldwide. Buyers have included both Muslims and non-Muslims, who wear it for reasons ranging from modesty, to protection from UV light, to enhanced athletic performance. Similar full-body swimsu

Azerbaijan—Urban Dress, the 1920s to the Twenty-First Century

Djurdja Bartlett

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Azeri (Azerbaijani ethnicity) aristocracy and the nascent bourgeoisie and intelligentsia gradually introduced elements of Western styles into their dress beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, when the region was still part of the Russian tsarist empire. Europeanized dress was one of the elements within a wider discourse that challenged the old way of life and its long-held traditions and proposed modernization in all the fields of society. A new role for women was on the agenda of secular

The Shawl and the Head Cover

Rosemary Crill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A draped, uncut length of cloth has been the basis of Indian male and female dress since the earliest times. This draped cloth has taken many forms, with the turban, sari, and dhoti having been the major components of dress across India for centuries. The focus on wrapped, untailored lengths of cloth altered with the arrival of the Kushans in the second century b.c.e. and in the wake of closer contacts with Central Asia through migrations and trade. Later, under the influence of Muslim culture fr

Body and Dress

Angela Durante and Jenny Ellison

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

All human cultures engage in some form of dress and adornment. Although our bodies and the items we put on them might appear to be separate, they in fact have a great deal in common and are considerably intertwined. A dressed body represents a complex set of negotiations between an individual, the fashion system, and the social context in which they exist. Codes of dress set parameters but do not entirely determine how individuals dress. The body and dress are mutually constitutive—dress adds soc

Dress in Egypt in the Twentieth Century

Betty Wass El-Wakil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Egypt has been ruled by foreign powers seeking to control its resources for much of the country’s history. The governing powers throughout history represented the elite, who served as a major influence on styles and fashions in clothing and dress. From the late eighteenth century onward, the French and the British had been attempting to displace the Turkish Ottoman rulers (1517–1798) and gain control over Egypt. The French under Napoleon invaded and occupied Egypt from 1798 to 1805. The Ottoman s

Islam and Islamically Correct Dress (Hijab)

Fadwa El Guindi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As a term and dress form, Islamic dress came into common usage in the mid-1970s, when college youth in urban centers of Egypt began to appear in what they called Islamic dress, a practice that gradually spread internally in Egypt across cities and social strata, and elsewhere in the Arab and Islamic world. The manifestation of the emergent Islamic movement in the form of a new type of dress and associated comportment among male and female college youth took society and even the religious authorit

Jewish Dress in Central and Southwest Asia and the Diaspora

Esther Juhasz

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Jewish dress has been shaped by the Jewish code of law, halacha, and various types of contacts with other religions and cultures. The halacha deals in detail with the desired conduct of a Jew in everyday life, including explicit rulings and recommended attitudes on dress. No specific dress was ever mandated by Jewish law, and as a result no universal Jewish dress evolved. Some common principles are recognizable in a variety of styles of Jewish dress. In some places Jews played an active role in t

Sports and Dress

Ingun Grimstad Klepp

Translated by Stig Erik Sørheim

Kjetil Enstad

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Europe, interest in sports and outdoor life emerged in the nineteenth century. The bourgeoisie went to the countryside to experience nature. Time spent in contact with nature was viewed as a source of inner peace and spiritual development, while awareness of the importance of physical activity for beauty and health grew. With the introduction of regulated working hours and official holidays at the beginning of the twentieth century, the working classes began to have vacation and spare time, to

Dress, Undress, Clothing, and Nudity

Frederick John Lamp

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The concepts of nudity and dress are burdened with implicit moral and cultural connotations as well as the subjectivity of the viewer. As a binary conception applied to the tropical non-Western world by European observers, nudity is entangled in a multitude of ideas about the self and the other, often pejorative to a greater or lesser extent, and inherently misconceived. A more accurate Western understanding of non-Western dress and nudity must take into account the existing and historical Wester

The Abayeh in Qatar

Christina Lindholm

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The abayeh is a contemporary long cloaklike garment worn by most Qatari women outside the home. The wearing of the abayeh and the shayla, the head covering, is not legally enforced, and both garments can be modified and decorated by the individual. While many own and wear Western dress at home, abayehs are willingly retained as a sign of respect for the woman’s culture, heritage, family honor, and gendered place in society. Most Qatari females adopt the abayeh and shayla at the onset of puberty.

High Heels

Rebecca Shawcross

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Heels were first introduced in the 1590s. In the 1660s Louis XIV of France made high heels fashionable for men. As a relatively short man he coupled high heels with tall wigs to create an illusion of height. Royal customization gave rise to red heels, a symbol of status and power, initially only worn by those in the royal court. High red heels continued to be fashionable into the 1770s.

Covering Concerns

Emma Tarlo

Source: Visibly Muslim. Fashion, Politics, Faith 4th Edition 2010

Book chapter

Russell Square tube station, 9.30 a.m., June 2007. A robed figure steps into the tube train. She is wearing a long free-flowing black abaya which sweeps from her shoulders to the floor. Her head is bound with a tight black headscarf, her face covered with a black face veil (niqab), tied at the back. Her eyes briefly scan her surroundings through the narrow slit of her niqab. She carries a large and noticeably stylish grey bag containing books and a file. She is probably a student. A middle-aged m

Islamic Fashion Scape

Emma Tarlo

Source: Visibly Muslim. Fashion, Politics, Faith 4th Edition 2010

Book chapter

If there is one factor that the first generation of British Islamic fashion designers share in common it is an understanding of the clothing dilemmas of young Muslims living in the West who wish to dress in ways that are fashionable and modern on the one hand and faithful and modest on the other. It is a dilemma which most designers learned, not so much through savvy market research and economic foresight, as from their own highly personal experiences of being unable to find clothes which express

The Coming of Islam and Its Influence on Dress

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The advent of Islam in the seventh century c.e. had a profound effect not only on the religious and philosophical aspects of life but also on the social and economic structures of Central and Southwest Asia. The new religion brought with it concepts about what was and was not acceptable in all aspects of life, including dress, with reverberations into the twenty-first century.

Reza Shah’s Dress Reforms in Iran

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Some of the most enduring and controversial legacies of the reign of Reza Shah Pahlavi, the shah of Iran from 1925 to 1941, were the changes he made in the dress of both men and women living in Iran. The repercussions of these changes can still be felt in the early twenty-first century.

The Chadari/Burqa of Afghanistan and Pakistan

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Afghan chadari, or burqa as it is also known, has become a global icon, but particularly with the period of Taliban influence in Afghanistan (1994–2001). For many in the non-Muslim world the chadari symbolizes the oppression of women. Some specialists in Afghan history insist that the garment should be called a chadari, not a burqa, the Arab name that seems to be associated with Islamic fundamentalism. From the medieval period onward it appears that these garments were primarily worn by urban

Face Veils

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A face veil is a separate garment that is used to cover all or part of the face, usually that of a woman. Ethnic and cultural origins often play a prominent role in whether a woman wears a face veil, and what type. Some groups have insisted on women being veiled because their presence is a sexual distraction to men. Veiling is also used to indicate the physical status of a female, that is, to show if she is in the fertile phase of her life. In patriarchal societies, veiling is sometimes linked to

Book chapter

I came to the study of wedding dresses as a daughter. The Fabrications project was my way of bridging the gap that distance, time and education had put between my mother and me. I used it to come to terms, intellectually and emotionally, with her skilled domestic labor, and the place this labor did or did not make for her in the world. As the exhibit developed, I became increasingly aware of the actual objects that Mom had created – her reality. One by one, out of boxes, trunks and closets, the w

The Afghan Woman’s “Chaadaree”: An Evocative Religious Expression?

M. Catherine Daly

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

According to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees in 1998 Afghans were the largest single-caseload refugee population in the world, numbering 2,633,900. During the height of their displacement nearly 20 years ago Afghan refugees numbered 6 million. The total population of Afghans living in areas contiguous to Afghanistan was approximately 3 million; 1.3 million Afghans lived in camp settlements of Pakistan. This figure did not include refugees living in non-camp urban centers of Pakist

Islamic Religion and Women’s Dress Code: The Islamic Republic of Iran

Faegheh Shirazi

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

The issue of hijab has become a fascinating topic not only in academia, but also in popular culture. The veil as an article of clothing or a garment carries multiple meanings and interpretations. The hijab no longer means a piece of cloth draped on a woman’s head. Now, the hijab is pregnant with meanings acquired during the most recent history of contemporary Islamic societies (Shirazi, in press).El Guindi’s most recent book on the veil goes into a much deeper and detailed discussion of the word

The Veil Becomes a Movement

Fadwa El Guindi

Source: Veil. Modesty, Privacy and Resistance 1999

Book chapter

At some point the characteristically Islamic rhythm of daily life in Egypt by which Muslims weave ordinary moments with sacred time and space tipped toward a mode of permanent religiousness. Some observers referred to this state as escapist religiosity. It was not confined to Muslims – Copts had a similar experience.

The Sacred in the Veil: “Hijab”

Fadwa El Guindi

Source: Veil. Modesty, Privacy and Resistance 1999

Book chapter

True meaning lies as if hidden behind a series of waxed seals . . . breaking one open only inspires the need to break open another . . . each meaning crumbles under the pressure of knowing . . . This is the principle of the veil well known to the Saracens [Sc. Arabs],This is notwithstanding Fra Mauro’s describing Islam as “the infidel religion of Mohammed” (Cowan 1996: 38). I hesitated long before using quotations from him.

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