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The Subject(s) of Street Style: Street Portraits as Fashion Singularities

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

What does street Philadelphiastylestyle photography ‘reveal’ about its subjects? What does it show us about who they are, where they are from, and the times they are living in? What hidden meanings does it unearth from the clothes they wear and the styles they embody? What kinds of anthropological knowledge, in other words, can we glean from a street style photograph? If the realism of street style photography is largely performative, a construct of the conventions photographers employ (see Chapt

“My Man, Let Me Pull Your Coat to Something”: Malcolm X

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

[P]eople are always speculating—why am I as I am? To understand that of any person, his whole life, from birth must be reviewed. All of our experiences fuse into our personality. Everything that ever happened to us is an ingredient.

Angel in the Market Place: The African-Jamaican Higgler 1880–1907

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

higgler (market trader): “A Jamaican Lady” postcardcritical draw ofLike many other African-Jamaicans featured on postcards during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, this woman’s personal details are lost to us. There is no way of knowing her age. She could be anywhere between forty and sixty. What is suggested that if she was closer to sixty, she was an ex-slave, and if nearer to forty, then her parents were enslaved. Either way, this woman had a direct link to the pre-emancipation

Photographic Representations of Pacific Peoples

Max Quanchi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The first camera arrived in the Pacific shortly after it was invented in France in 1839, and photographs of Pacific Islanders were taken during several European voyages in the 1840s. Most of these photographs have not survived. Permanent European traders, settlers, and regular visitors increased after the founding of Botany Bay (Sydney) in 1788 and the growth of port towns at Honolulu, Papeete, Levuka, and Apia; and an accessible collection of photographs, many recording the dress and accoutremen

Dress and Art: Western

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Images of people wearing clothing create an obvious connection between dress and art. Because relatively few examples of historic garments survive, these images document the history of dress. Historically, those sitting for portraits chose their dress to project a specific image; the artist was responsible for conveying messages encoded in dress, meticulously reproducing them. Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass have commented that Renaissance clothes were perceived as material forms of pers

‘Twisted’ Poses: The Kabuku Aesthetic in Early Edo Genre Painting

John T. Carpenter

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Kabuki as we know it today – a highly respectable ‘traditional’ theatre with male actors playing established roles in dramas with complex plots – did not emerge until the late seventeenth century. In its earliest manifestation, it was a dance theatre with female performers, whose dances and skits appealed to the warrior elite and commoner alike. The word for Kabuki drama is now properly written with three Chinese characters, ‘song’, ‘dance’, and ‘skill’, but it has a less flattering etymology rel

‘A Dream of Fair Women’: Revival Dress and the Formation of Late Victorian Images of Femininity

Margaret Maynard

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

He shares with Reynolds and Gainsborough the good fortune of having kept alive for us a society of which the fascination is enduring – that limited and privileged society of the eighteenth century, which had realised such a perfect art of living, and with which we can clasp hands across the gulf, as we cannot with the men and women of Charles the Second's time, or even of Queen Anne's.T. H.Ward and W.Roberts, Romney: A Biographical and Critical Essay, London, 1904, vol. 1, p. 78.

Fashion Anatomy for Women: Simple Sketching Methods

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion proportions for a standing fashion figure need to be studied in four major views. It is easiest to analyze these views using a standing-still position. “Still,” or nonactive, means that the model isn’t posing yet.

Women’s Posing Dynamics: Sketching Guidelines for Analyzing Poses

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Center front and the balance line are two separate lines that support and translate movement within a pose. These two separate lines intersect or merge with each other in a still pose. Both lines are more visible and run independently of each other in an active pose.

Women’s Arms and Legs: Contours and Shaping

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The arms are drawn in two equal sections: upper arm and lower arm. Whether fully extended, folded, or bent in a pose, the arms are drawn in matching lengths to each other. Their length is in direct proportion to the total length of the torso, starting at the top with the shoulder cap. The elbow, in the middle of the arm, falls naturally at the waistline on the torso. The end of the arm lines up with the end of the torso.

The Woman’s Torso: Utilizing Fashion Sewing Lines on the Body

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter focuses on sketching the torso. Use contour for the exterior of the sketch and definition for the interior skeletal reference, shaping the edge. The fashion industry’s sewing lines can be used to form the curves within the torso. Each of these studies will be applied to the four basic views in fashion model drawing. Refer to the CD-ROM that accompanies this book for further study of the complete rotation of this pose. It also includes additional sketching instructions.

Styling, Layout, and Composition for Women: Posing Figures Together

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Layout is easy to master when you focus on its goals and understand its process. The process is to build in a relationship between two or more figures to create a fashion point of view. This chapter examines the most common doubles layout formats. As shown grouped together on the facing page it can be difficult to isolate the different formats; however, you can identify the variety in the form. All four of these layouts are explained in this chapter.

Fashion Anatomy for Men: Simple Sketching Methods

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion proportions for a standing fashion figure need to be studied in four major views. It is easiest to analyze these views using a standing-still position. “Still” or nonactive means that the model isn’t posing yet.

Men’s Posing Dynamics: Sketching Guidelines for Analyzing Poses

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Posing dynamics come from the action within a pose. This action usually changes with each new pose. Analyzing a pose will help you understand which elements you want to capture in your sketch, and how to make it a better drawing. By studying these four basic posing dynamics, and applying them, you will have more insight and a better support structure for your figure sketches.

Men’s Arms and Legs: Contours and Shaping

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The arms are drawn in two equal sections: upper arm and lower arm. Whether fully extended, folded, or bent in a pose, the arms are drawn in matching lengths to each other. Their length is in direct proportion to the total length of the torso, starting at the top with the shoulder cap. The elbow, in the middle of the arm, falls naturally at the waistline on the torso. The end of the arm lines up with the end of the torso.

Styling, Layout, and Composition for Men: Posing Figures Together

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Layout is easy to master when you focus on its goals and understand its process. The process is to build in a relationship between two or more figures to create a fashion point of view. This chapter examines the most common doubles layout formats. As shown grouped together above and on the facing page, it can be difficult to isolate the different formats; however, you can identify the variety in the form. All four of these layouts are explained in this chapter.

Fashion Anatomy for Children: Simple Sketching Methods

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In fashion model drawing, a direct relationship exists between children’s ages and heights and their clothing sizes based on specific market categories. These categories are infant–baby, not walking yet; toddler, just walking; child, ages 6 to 9; and tween, ages 10 to 14. “Tween” used to be called preteen or junior. These categories have very specific sets of proportions per group.

Children’s Posing Dynamics: Sketching Guidelines for Analyzing Poses

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Center front is a line that runs through the middle of the torso from the top of the pit of the neck to the bottom of the end of the torso at the crotch of the body.

Close-Up Studies

Bina Abling

Source: Model Drawing, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

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