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Kostas Murkudis

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dirk Bikkembergs

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Ann Demeulemeester

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dries Van Noten

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

“Safety-Pin Dress,” Versace Haute Couture, Spring/Summer 1994

Julia Petrov

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Now synonymous with the actress who wore it, the “Liz Hurley” dress has become entrenched in popular culture. Originally an elite couture object that played with sartorial codes of high and low fashion, the dress was later referenced and imitated countless times. Remarkable for its deconstructed tailoring, which revealed as much as it concealed, this gown married a punk sensibility with red carpet style.

Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1994

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For Yohji Yamamoto’s spring/summer 1994 collection, white makes an appearance in nearly every look—and these were created with layers, as the fashion designer continued working on redefining men’s wardrobes. Following the trends for the season, several versions of the classic white button-down shirt were presented, including longer versions akin to the Moroccan djellaba. Stripes were also seen on various items of clothing. The collection received mixed reviews from fashion critics.

Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1992

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For his spring/summer 1992 collection, Yohji Yamamoto continued to recruit models who were not runway professionals. In the previous season, he had worked primarily with musicians. This time round, he turned to sportsmen, including tennis player Yannick Noah and footballer José Touré. The show was an ambitious one, with close to a hundred looks. Many of them were in shades of gray and blue, with punches of color offered in the wide variety of outfits available. The collection followed the season’

Yohji Yamamoto, Fall/Winter 1992

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

By now, recruiting models from all walks of life had become Yamamoto’s modus operandi, and for his fall/winter 1992 collection there were “real” people of a variety of ages and nationalities. The show provided looks that appeared to be for the cold outdoors, echoed in the rough, wooden planks that made up the runway. Outfits were made in fabrics suitable for keeping warm in the colder months, and completed with bold accessories such as big boots, knitted hats, and even eyepatches.

Koji Tatsuno, Fall/Winter 1993

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Koji Tatsuno is a London-based Japanese designer who first arrived in the city on an antiques sourcing trip in 1982. The invitation to his fall/winter 1993 presentation was printed on paper towels, which reflected his love of, and talent for, combining found fabrics with deft ornamentation to create highly imaginative outfits—and this was shown off well in this collection, which received high praise from fashion critics.

Yohji Yamamoto, Fall/Winter 1991

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Yohji Yamamoto became famous in the 1980s as part of a trio of Japanese fashion designers (together with Rei Kawakubo and Issey Miyake) known for their avant-garde, antiestablishment, deconstructionist aesthetic, in a rejection and overturning of Western notions of beauty and form. For his fall/winter 1991 menswear collection, which was modeled by musicians, Yamamoto gave fans the relaxed silhouettes that they had come to expect from the forward-thinking fashion designer, and took inspiration fro

Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Vera Mackie (2003: 144)… women [in Japan] were condemned to be ‘mothers’ or ‘whores’.

Global Influences: Challenging Western Traditions

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

The Maison Margiela teamThe designers that we most admire are ‘those with an authentic approach to their work.’

Belgium

Karlijn Bronselaer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Belgium played a vital role in the industrialization of the European textile industry. Belgian society changed very quickly due to industrialization during the first half of the nineteenth century. From about the 1820s on the fashionable silhouette in West Europe was the hourglass. Although the average Belgian had neither time nor money for fashion, improved production methods and sewing machines made corsets more affordable. Later, the Art Nouveau or Jugendstil movement (ca. 1890–1920), with its

Design Innovation by Japanese Designers Miyake, Kawakubo, and Yamamoto

Sandhya Lalloo-Morar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Rarely has a concept in clothing design attracted the sort of dread and hysteria that deconstruction has incited since its inception in 1967. Deconstruction can be described as the literal dismantling of clothes in order to destroy fashion. The philosophy was aimed at un-building the constructs of a culture inherited from previous generations.Japanese designers Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, and Rei Kawakubo have been widely regarded as innovators in the fashion world and leading exponents of deco

When Is Fashion Design?

Ingrid Loschek

Source: When Clothes Become Fashion. Design and Innovation Systems 2009

Book chapter

An object is not a design object as such; it becomes one as a consequence of the pretension with which the object is used. This pretension is based on a social component. A functional object such as a car tyre may become design when adapted into a table, from which the question emerges: When is design? The car tyre is design when it is recognised and declared as such, and thus becomes socially relevant. With reference to the alienation of objects in design, for example a bucket painted in bright

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