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Culture and Consumer Behavior

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

Zoomorphic Brooches in Roman Britain: Decoration or Religious Ideology?

Lindsay Allason-Jones

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Secular Fashion In Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

national dress/costumeSabraIsrael, twentieth centuryIn national images depicting the early years of the State of Israel, the word “fashion” is deliberately associated with the unkempt pioneering sabra look: khakikhaki shorts and blue shirts characteristic of the socialist youth movements, pinafores and rubashka shirts influenced by Eastern European style, Bedouin kaffiyahkaffiyahs, biblical sandals, and dome-shaped caps known as kova tembel. To a large extent, this look became Israel’s national m

Management Strategies for Retail Growth

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Retailing footwear is a diverse activity that encompasses a variety of elements in addition to selling tangible products. Fashion styles and trends move quickly, and there are fluctuations in consumers’ preferences. The technology to design and deliver product to stores is constantly evolving, and the means of display, communication, and promotion of footwear is now highly sophisticated. In recent years there has been rapid development of online retailing. Previously seen as an option or strategi

China

Shubhapriya Bennur, Yiyue Fan, Md. Rashaduzzaman, Laubie Li, Jun Ying Yu and Jaya Halepete

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After reading this chapter, you will:

Sartorial Boundaries on the Chinese Frontier

Antonia Finnane

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I return home and see my kin …

South Korea

Ji Hye Kang, Shubhapriya Bennur, Sowon Hahn, Junghwa Son, Sung Ha Jang and Youngsoo Ha

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

South Koreaoverview and historySouth KoreaAfter reading this chapter, you will

Dress and Impression Formation

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, we continue with the same general topic of social cognition. In Chapter 4, “Dress and Social Cognition” we introduced the concept of impression formation. In this chapter we expand our discussion on impression formation to include attribution, Implicit Personality Theory, impression management, and dramaturgy. We also include a discussion of role theory as it relates to social perception, look at the rise and fall in popularity of casual business dress, examine some of the behavi

Dress and Identity

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 9, “Dress and the Self “ we said that the self is a dynamic interactive system of beliefs, feelings, and motives that characterize you as an individual. But because humans are complex, our selves are multi-dimensional. In the mornings you attend classes (i.e., you are a student), on weekends you play basketball with other members of your team (i.e., you are an athlete). To acknowledge this diversity, we say that the self is composed of several identities. It is important to understand

Dress and Cultural Aesthetics

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As discussed in Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” culture is the predominant phenomenon that explains why humans behave in the ways they do, including the behavior of dressing. Cultural mentifacts (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values, ideology) and sociofacts (e.g., social organizations including religious, education, government, family structure) help to explain cultural artifacts (e.g., clothing, appearance products, houses, household goods, vehicles, tools, equipment). In this chapter, we explore lev

Dress and Cultural Rituals

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As noted in Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” culture is the way that humans organize their world. It is the fundamental determinant of how we live as we do and how that life is shaped. When we contemplate how our lives are shaped, and how our lives are different from the lives of others, we see that they are shaped by our values and view of the world, our lifestyles, our traditions, and the products of human workmanship that we use and that surround us.

Why Study Dress?

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress is one of the most interesting aspects of human behavior we can study. Everyone in the world “dresses” their body. Dress has long been a means to communicate information about the self to others, to express the self creatively, and to protect the self from physical and psychological harm.

Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ “Macaroni” Prints

Peter Mcneil

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Painted caricatures began on the “Grand TourGrand Tour” as private jokes shared between young men and their tutors. Private Italian painters working in Florence inspired the English development of this field. Etchings were made by Pier Leone Ghezzi (1674–1755) and Pietro Longhi (1702–85), and painted in Rome by English artists including Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Patch (1725–82). Horace Walpole wrote in his journal thus: “Patch was excellent in Caricatura, and was in much favour with the youn

The Black Prince of Elegance

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Eternelle superiorité du Dandy.

Military Dress as an Ideological Marker in Roman Palestine

Guy D. Stiebel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Only a few instances from the Roman Empire actually provide scholars with near-complete assemblages of panoplies, and most rare of all are the remains that derived directly from conflict lands. In addition to the celebrated navy soldier from ce79 Herculaneum,R. Gore, “2000 Years of Silence: The Dead Do Tell Tales at Vesuvius,” National Geographic, 165 (1984), pp. 557–613; S. Ortisi “Pompeji und Herculaneum—Soldaten in den Vesuvsdäten,” Archäologie der Schlachtfelder—Militaria aus Zerstörungshoriz

Wearing the flag: Patriotism and Globalization

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Captain AmericaCaptain America was created as a defender of the values of the United States of America. His appearance resembles those of Olympians, for whom national allegiance becomes the defining factor in the design of their uniforms. When they inject Steve Rogers with a serum to give him super-powers, the American secret service intend that his supernatural athleticismathleticism will be used in combat, on behalf of the US Army. He is dressed in a flag-like costume, and introduced to the wor

Two: Thinking Critically: A History and Conceptual Examination of Fashion Branding

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

New ads began to appear showing clothing that reflected the current fashion, with each advertisement trying to vie for the almighty dollar. At this time the French philosopher Roland Barthes suggested that advertising was creating a new level of existence for fashion. Barthes developed a theory that has since been called “The Fashion System,” which states that a garment is present at three distinct levels: the real garment or actual thing; the terminological garment, which signifies the basic ter

Collections and their influences

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Every season, designers strive to develop their signature look or visual identity through their collections. Often they reference a number of sources and influences relevant to the current global, political, and social climate. For example, the emergence of deconstruction and reconstruction is evident during times of recession, such as in the early 1990s and during the economic downturn of the late 2000s. New, radical directions in fashion are often a reflection of, or a reaction to, the excesses

Popular Culture And Forecasting

Evelyn L. Brannon and Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Forecasting, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

It used to be that we had six months to show something and then manufacture it. Now it only takes a week to copy something from an image on the Internet. So creatively, you have to be more and more unique.

Seeing in the light—“sun”glasses, modern glamor, cool, and celebrity (1920s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Today, a more general sense that sunglasses protect our eyes from sunlight dominates. After all, the name finally settled on for all kinds of motor goggles, protective spectacles, autoglasses, and so on was (and is) sunglasses, conjuring up countless images of those bikini-clad women and casual, white linen-clad men basking in the glow of their own attractiveness, their sunglasses bouncing back that gold-colored light of happiness and success. Smiling or not, these men and women are embodiments o

Heading for the shade—the spread of outsider cool (1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

outsiderSunglasses were tactically used by people who were “outside” the goals and means of dominant society, as part of an articulation of a dissonant style which held an attraction just as great as that of those sunny images of “straight” success and leisure. This chapter will show how the more complex connotations of “outsider cool” became desirable and were appropriated by the “mainstream” in the 1950s and 1960s and beyond. Sunglasses could act as a sign of a “bettered self”—but they also sta

All Out in the Wash: Convict Stain Removal in the Narryna Heritage Museum’s Dress Collection

Jennifer Clynk and Sharon Peoples

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This study extends historian Stefan Petrow’s 2009 study of the convict stain and Narryna by suggesting ways in which its effects can be overcome or reinterpreted, especially in relation to dress. The metaphor of the convict stain relates to a social stigma dating from the 1840s, when anti-transportationists in VDL began a fierce political and moral campaign against convict transportation to the colony. The stain metaphor was a nineteenth-century term applied by historians from the 1850s through t

Maurizio Baldassari

Katy Conover

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

‘Look At Me I’M Different!’: Identity Art And The Expectations Of Race

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

National identification is an exemplary case of how an external border is reflected into an internal limit. Of course, the first step towards the identity of the nation is defined through differences from other nations, via an external border: if I identify myself as an Englishman, I distinguish myself from the French, German, Scots, Irish, and so on. However, in the next stage, the question is raised of who among the English are ‘the real English’, the paradigm of Englishness; who are the Englis

Exoticism At The Brink: Contemporary Chinese And Aboriginal Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

For a better understanding of this conundrum, it is useful to digress briefly using another analogy from the fashion industry proper. At the same time as Aboriginal art was ‘born’ in the 1970s, Parisian couture began to experience an extraordinary change with the entry of new designers: Takada, KenzoKenzo, Rei Kawakubo, ReiKawakubo (Comme des Garçons), Issey Miyake, IsseyMiyake, Yamomoto, YohjiYohji Yamamoto and Hanae Mori, HanaeMori are the most successful of these, now hailed as bringing about

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