Results: Text (15) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 15 of 15 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Exoticism At The Brink: Contemporary Chinese And Aboriginal Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

For a better understanding of this conundrum, it is useful to digress briefly using another analogy from the fashion industry proper. At the same time as Aboriginal art was ‘born’ in the 1970s, Parisian couture began to experience an extraordinary change with the entry of new designers: Takada, KenzoKenzo, Rei Kawakubo, ReiKawakubo (Comme des Garçons), Issey Miyake, IsseyMiyake, Yamomoto, YohjiYohji Yamamoto and Hanae Mori, HanaeMori are the most successful of these, now hailed as bringing about

Inside-Out: Outsider Artists Go Inside

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

The term ‘Outsider Art’ was coined in 1972 (a year after the ‘birth’ of Contemporary Aboriginal, Aboriginal artAboriginal art) by the English art critic Roger Cardinal, RogerCardinal as an umbrella term to describe the art produced by those not associated with, admitted to or educated by the art scene, denoting usually the insane, but also the parochial ingenue. ‘Outsider Art’ also incorporates the ‘Art BrutArt Brut’ of French postwar artist Jean Dubuffet, JeanDubuffet, and folk art as part of it

Aboriginal Dress in the Kimberley, Western Australia

Kim Akerman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As in most other areas of Australia, the Aboriginals of the Kimberley were traditionally unclothed. For them, dress consisted of headbands and hair belts. Pubic tassels (made by tying multiple strands of spun fur or hair string into a mop, suspended over the genital area) were worn occasionally. Other elements of dress consisted of ornaments made from feathers, fibers, animal teeth, or shell, the use of which was often dictated by the ceremonial and social status of the wearer. More complex ornam

Aboriginal Skin Cloaks

Fabri Blacklock

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In customary societies Aboriginal people were minimally clothed until contact with Europeans began to alter their habits. One exception was the skin cloaks widely worn by men and women throughout temperate zones of southeastern and western Australia. Cloaks were their main article of dress, important as rugs for warmth, but also for ceremonial use, trade, and as burial shrouds. Indigenous peoples made a variety of cloaks from different types of skin: possums, kangaroos, wallabies, and other fur-b

Aboriginal Dress in Arnhem Land

Louise Hamby

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The items that Aboriginal people wore on their bodies in Arnhem Land, an Aboriginal reserve in the top portion of the Northern Territory, before contact with outsiders from Macassar and the rest of Australia, were influenced by environmental, cultural, and social factors. The landscape varies from the coast; Arnhem Land changes from escarpment to open woodlands. It has a monsoonal climate with hot to warm temperatures in both the wet and the dry seasons. Bodily items were not worn for warmth, pro

Aboriginal Dress in Australia: Evidence and Resources

Philip Jones

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As Bernard Smith, eminent historian of the art of colonial encounter, has demonstrated so clearly, Australian Aboriginal people have often been portrayed in terms of “hard primitivism.” Their minimalist suite of material possessions, their enforced nomadism and capacity to survive the harshest conditions, has been readily juxtaposed with the “soft primitivism” of hierarchically organized and sedentary Pacific peoples. This tendency can be traced from the earliest descriptions made by Dutch seafar

Aboriginal Dress in North Queensland, Australia

Kate Khan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although there had been occasional contact between Europeans and Aboriginal people in north Queensland since 1606, by the 1860s the increasing influx of Europeans and Chinese occupying Aboriginal lands made conflict inevitable. Until the 1870s tribal groups living in the rain forest region of Cape York Peninsula, north Queensland, escaped the upheavals of foreign contact and continued to lead the life of successful hunter-gatherers in this rich natural environment. Many items were unique to the r

Aboriginal Dress in Southeast Australia

Sylvia Kleinert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress embodies a complex system of meanings in Aboriginal society. On the one hand, dress is seen to be pivotal to the formation of individual and group identity, articulating relationships between private and public. On the other hand, dress expands our understanding of the way in which Aboriginal people have engaged in cross-cultural relations with a colonial regime. Prior to European contact, the dressed body and its embellishment with artifacts encoded multiple meanings as a marker of individ

Geographical and Geopolitical Introduction

Margaret Maynard

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Pacific region covers a vast geographic area. From the continent of Australia it reaches its southernmost point at Antarctica, while to the north it extends to the shores of Asia, and to the west, the Americas. It includes all the island groups of Micronesia, Polynesia, and Melanesia. The first inhabitants arrived between forty thousand and sixty thousand years ago and populated Australia and New Guinea with successive waves of Austronesians, settling island after island. The Māori were among

Economies and Cultures of Dress

Margaret Maynard

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The economic and cultural history of dress in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific is extraordinarily complex and varied. The region spans highly industrialized nations, communities based on subsistence living, and intermediary economies. Shifts in cultural attitudes toward dress and the body and alteration to economies over time have been accentuated by trade with Europe, the United States, and Asia. Clothing demarcating gender and age differences must be acknowledged, as well as cross-cultur

Aboriginal Dress in Taiwan

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

According to the 2006 census, the total population of Taiwan’s recognized aboriginal peoples is 485,000, approximately two percent of the population. Historically these peoples occupied land spread over much of the island; however, since the seventeenth century their interaction with colonizing powers has resulted in the concentration of populations in the mountains of eastern Taiwan. One consequence of this is the distinction made by Han Chinese administrators during the eighteenth century betwe

Dressing the Body in the Western Desert, Australia

Diana Young

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The accounts of Aboriginal people themselves and other historical documentation suggest that from the time indigenous people came into contact with European clothes and other textiles such as blankets and woolen yarns, they were highly desirous of them. That period of contact was later in Central Australia than elsewhere (except perhaps eastern Arnhem Land). In the Western Desert, the area south and west of what came to be called Alice Springs on Arrernte country, it was as late as the 1950s and

Historical Evidence: Taiwan

Ho Zhaohua

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Taiwanese dress has been deeply influenced by politics and history. Taiwan’s location approximately 150 kilometers (93 miles) off the southeastern coast of China has over the centuries both linked it to and separated it from mainland East Asia. It continues to be a major factor in the geopolitics of the region in the early twenty-first century. Taiwan’s location on major maritime trading routes from Southeast Asia, Indonesia, China, Korea, Japan, and the Ryukyu Islands has also imp

Book chapter

‘I think I hear you saying, “Where the Deuce is Sydney Cove, Port Jackson?”’, wrote George Worgan, surgeon on the convict transport Sirius, in 1788. The First Fleet had sailed from Portsmouth harbour, England, on May 13, 1787: ‘the Cape of Good Hope was the last country touched at … where every article necessary for forming a civilised colony was provisioned and, thus equipped, each like another Noah’s Ark, eleven ships steered away for Botany Bay [Sydney]’ (Worgan, 1788: 1). Governor Arthur Phil

Blankets: The Visible Politics of Indigenous Clothing

Margaret Maynard

Source: Fashioning the Body Politic. Dress, Gender, Citizenship 2002

Book chapter

Clothing is a complex and generally gender-specific bodily covering, which may be read in many ways. Its multiple and various meanings differ widely between the wearer’s intentions and other people’s perceptions about what is worn. It is thus an aspect of material culture that has serious public implications, for it is one of the ways whereby a culture projects ideas, organizes itself or is brought under the control of another society socially, economically and politically. Importantly it is also

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 15 of 15 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1