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Chloé

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dance Costumes

Margaret A. Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The category of dance costume is a specialized type of dress usually reserved for performances and masquerade. In North Africa as elsewhere, dance costumes are worn for performances at special events and in entertainment venues. Three general categories of dance in North Africa are raks shaabi (popular dance), raks beledi (country dance), and raks sharqi (eastern dance).

Dress in Egypt in the Twentieth Century

Betty Wass El-Wakil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Egypt has been ruled by foreign powers seeking to control its resources for much of the country’s history. The governing powers throughout history represented the elite, who served as a major influence on styles and fashions in clothing and dress. From the late eighteenth century onward, the French and the British had been attempting to displace the Turkish Ottoman rulers (1517–1798) and gain control over Egypt. The French under Napoleon invaded and occupied Egypt from 1798 to 1805. The Ottoman s

Christian Secular, Monastic, and Liturgical Dress in the Eastern Mediterranean

Karel C. Innemée

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The first Christian communities were established around the Mediterranean in the first century c.e. At that time there was not yet a unifying structure. By the second century, most communities observed three ranks in the local hierarchy: an episkopos (bishop, literally overseer) as the head, presbyteroi (priests), and diakonoi (deacons). There was not yet any kind of distinctive garment that indicated rank. The first Council of Nicea (325 c.e.) brought together bishops from all over the Christian

Footwear

Doran H. Ross

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In discussions of dress in Africa, soled footwear is generally considered only as an afterthought, and the barefoot stereotype still pervades popular thinking about Africa. Feet, however, are conceptually dressed and framed in many of the same ways as hands and head. And much like the adornment of other parts of the body in Africa, elaborate forms of footwear were and are generally reserved for wealthier segments of society, although distinctions based on gender, age, vocation, and religion are a

Muharram and Dress

Ashgar Seyed-Gohrab

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

National and religious festivals serve as visible signs of renewal, initiation rituals, reenactments of the oath of the community, and reminders of particular identities. To indicate these aspects of a festival, people dress themselves in special attire, depending on the nature of the festival. Muharram is one of the most eminent festivals of the Shiites.

Archaeological Evidence

Fred T. Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Africa, the human body has always been a focus for creative expression. Each culture has evolved its own patterns of dress and associated symbolic system, yet cross-cultural influences and change have constantly occurred. A society’s political structure and religious institutions can determine the type of dress used. Societies with a centralized organization often have elaborate, even grandiose programs of visual culture associated with leadership. The ruler or an elite group often reserves th

North Africa

Fred T. Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North Africa consists of Egypt in the east and the lands to the west, or Maghreb (the Arabic term for “the place of sunset”). Because of a rich archaeological record, a substantial amount of information exists on ancient Egyptian textiles. In ancient Egypt, loincloths and linen kilts with a belt were common items of male clothing, while women wore tight-fitting dresses or skirts. Women’s dresses became looser in the New Kingdom and were decorated with pleats and folds. Both sexes wore woolen cloa

Face Veils

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A face veil is a separate garment that is used to cover all or part of the face, usually that of a woman. Ethnic and cultural origins often play a prominent role in whether a woman wears a face veil, and what type. Some groups have insisted on women being veiled because their presence is a sexual distraction to men. Veiling is also used to indicate the physical status of a female, that is, to show if she is in the fertile phase of her life. In patriarchal societies, veiling is sometimes linked to

Egypt: Historical Dress

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood and Tineke Rooijakkers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of dress in Egypt is long and complicated and highly influenced by the country’s geographical location at the crossroads of Asia, Africa, and Europe. For centuries, various groups have fought for control of Egypt because of its strategic economic and political position. Each group has left its mark on Egyptian culture, including the dress worn by its inhabitants. The study of dress in Egypt is facilitated by the hot, dry climate that has preserved organic artifacts such as textiles, g

Veiling and Feminism

Fadwa El Guindi

Source: Veil. Modesty, Privacy and Resistance 1999

Book chapter

Three major events occurring in succession demonstrate this shiftThe jubilation among Arab populations, including those in the Gulf countries, over Iran’s recent (June 1998) victory over the United States in the recent World Cup held in France is another manifestation of the shift. Further, the decision by the United Nations General Assembly on 7 July 1998 that granted Special Status to Palestine (alongside the Vatican and Switzerland) is a crucial development. in the regional political landscape

The Veil Becomes a Movement

Fadwa El Guindi

Source: Veil. Modesty, Privacy and Resistance 1999

Book chapter

At some point the characteristically Islamic rhythm of daily life in Egypt by which Muslims weave ordinary moments with sacred time and space tipped toward a mode of permanent religiousness. Some observers referred to this state as escapist religiosity. It was not confined to Muslims – Copts had a similar experience.

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