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Morocco

Cynthia J. Becker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Morocco has long been a crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa, and dress reflects the richness of its history as well as its geographic and cultural diversity. Forty to sixty percent of the Moroccan population is Berber, and many Berbers have retained their indigenous language. After the Phoenicians and then the Romans settled in Morocco and encountered the Berbers, Arabs moved into Morocco in the seventh century, founding the city of Fes and gradually converting the

Dance Costumes

Margaret A. Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The category of dance costume is a specialized type of dress usually reserved for performances and masquerade. In North Africa as elsewhere, dance costumes are worn for performances at special events and in entertainment venues. Three general categories of dance in North Africa are raks shaabi (popular dance), raks beledi (country dance), and raks sharqi (eastern dance).

Moroccan Fashion Designers

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Since the last decade of the twentieth century and with the turn of the twenty-first, a new generation of Moroccan fashion designers and photographers has played a part on the international fashion stage, combining Western-style fashions with elements of traditional Arab and Berber dress to subvert both European and Moroccan sartorial conventions. While notable names such as Amine Bendriouch, Alber Elbaz, Jean-Charles de Caselbajac, Hisham Oumlil, Aziz Bekkaoui, Samira Haddouchi, and Hassan Hajja

Twenty-First-Century Moroccan Women’s Dress

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Morocco in the twenty-first century, traditional forms of women’s clothing exist side by side with Western consumer fashions, allowing Moroccan women to express their economic, social, cultural, political, and religious identities through their choice of dress. Examining Moroccan women’s dress, predominantly in urban areas, for its material properties and expressive capabilities offers insights into the complexities of individual and collective identities in Morocco in the early twenty-first c

Veils and the Hajj

Elisha P. Renne

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Veils have historically been associated with women’s performance of hajj (the pilgrimage to Mecca) in Saudi Arabia, as documented in the travel narratives of attending pilgrims. While pilgrimage to Mecca prior to the mid-twentieth century entailed extended, sometimes lifelong, travel over land and by sea, airplanes have allowed many more Muslim men and women from around the world to perform hajj since the 1950s.This increase has exposed Muslim women to many different styles of veils worn in count

North Africa

Fred T. Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North Africa consists of Egypt in the east and the lands to the west, or Maghreb (the Arabic term for “the place of sunset”). Because of a rich archaeological record, a substantial amount of information exists on ancient Egyptian textiles. In ancient Egypt, loincloths and linen kilts with a belt were common items of male clothing, while women wore tight-fitting dresses or skirts. Women’s dresses became looser in the New Kingdom and were decorated with pleats and folds. Both sexes wore woolen cloa

Awakening The Senses: The Aesthetics of Moroccan Berber Dress

Cynthia Becker

Source: Dress Sense. Emotional and Sensory Experiences of the Body and Clothes 2007

Book chapter

Book chapter

The dress associated with weddings teaches gender roles, instructing the bride what is expected of her in society. Although gender roles and opportunities continue to change for young Ait Khabbash women, the process of dressing the bride teaches her the ancestral values and behaviors expected of a married woman. The bride’s dressing ceremony refers to the night before the actual wedding and specifically designates the occasion when the bride is dressed in her wedding clothes. The act of dressing

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