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Swaziland

Lombuso Khoza

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The kingdom of Swaziland, which gained independence from Britain in 1968, lies between South Africa and Mozambique. The population shares a culture, language, and loyalty to their monarch. In the1840s Europeans brought cloth and beads, which local peoples creatively added to their traditional attire. Today, in town or country, Swazis wear traditional or Western clothing, or combine both. Traditional dress, worn for ceremonies, plays a vital role in maintaining cultural ties. Lacking written recor

Madagascar

John Mack

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Madagascar is by far the largest of the islands lying off the coast of Africa, yet its traditions of dress and personal decoration are distinctively different from what is found even on adjacent parts of the continent. They also show considerable differentiation within the island itself. Clothing is adapted both to extremes of heat and, in the center of the island, to cold, especially at night. Banana tree fiber, bark, hemp, and indigenous silkworms have all been exploited in making textiles, and

Swazi Bridal Attire: Culture, Traditions and Customs

Lombuso S. Khoza and Laura K. Kidd

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures 2003

Book chapter

The Kingdom of Swaziland, a small, landlocked, mountainous country in southeastern Africa, 6,704 square miles (17,364 square kilometers) in area, is surrounded by South Africa in the north, west and south, and bordered by Mozambique to the east. The country’s current estimated population is 1,083,289. The Swazi people, descendant from the Nguni, historically have been able to maintain homogeneity and may be considered a “tribal-less” nation, sharing a common language and common cultural tradition

“The Fairest of Them All”: Gender, Ethnicity and a Beauty Pageant in the Kingdom of Swaziland

Carolyn Behrman

Source: Dress and Ethnicity. Change Across Space and Time 1995

Book chapter

In her discussion of representations of whiteness in the black imagination, bell hooks writes of the “looking relations” (1992: 340) between white supremacists and black slaves. Using Foucault’s concept of the gaze, she finds socio-political meaning in the structured ways that people see each other. In this chapter I wish to raise for consideration the possibility that looking relations focusing on ethnicity and gender between two groups of people can be used as political tools within one of thos

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