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Guinea-Bissau

Walter Hawthorne and Clara Carvalho

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Guinea Bissau, northwest of Guinea and south of Senegal, is located on the Atlantic Coast. The region has long been home to dozens of relatively small-scale, politically decentralized societies, three of the largest of which are the Bijago, Manjaco, and Balanta. The Guinea Bissau region has witnessed the comings and goings of foreigners for many centuries, culminating in Portuguese colonization in the early twentieth century. The broad economic, political, and social changes that were forced upon

Liberia

Jane Martin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Liberian dress and fashion in the twenty-first century is based on a heritage from indigenous African societies, from returned African Americans and their descendants, and from the mixed communities that developed throughout nearly two centuries. The dress codes of those who governed Liberia were derived from the southern United States. Western dress was the dress of choice. In the later twentieth century, lappa suits, boubous, and Vai shirts indicated the increased engagement of Liberia with oth

Guinea

Mohamed N’Daou

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Guinea is a country surrounded by Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Mali, Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia, and Sierra-Leone; it shares history with each of these countries that has influenced Guinean modes of dress up to the present day. From the eleventh century to the late nineteenth century, Guinea was an ensemble of separate animist and Islamic precolonial kingdoms, each of them diverse ethnic groups that the French colonizers transformed into a colonial nation called French Guinea from 1895 to 1958, after whic

Equatorial Guinea

Enrique Okenve

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The tiny central African country of Equatorial Guinea covers only 28,051 square kilometers (11,000 square miles). It is comprised of a few islands, of which Bioko—formerly known as Fernando Po—off the coast of Cameroon is the largest, and a 26,000-square-kilometer (10,000-square-mile) mainland territory known as Rio Muni nestled between Cameroon and Gabon. With European expansionism, these territories were ceded in 1778 from Portugal to Spain, but the Spaniards did not arrive until 1858. During t

Fang of Equatorial Guinea and Gabon

Louis P. Perrois

Translated by Francine Farr

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Fang of equatorial Africa dazzled all who crossed their path of east-to-west migration toward the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Guinea that ended in the early twentieth century. In 1843, U.S. pastor John Wilson noted, as quoted inMerlet’sLe pays des trois estuaires, 1471–1900, that they were “naked except for a bark loincloth …. Their hair hangs in braids. They carry knives, spears, and many iron objects they make themselves.” In 1847, French naval lieutenant Méquet, plying the Como River on the

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