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Fashion Politics and Practice: Indian Cottons and Consumer Innovation in Tokugawa Japan and Early Modern England, C. 1600–1800

Beverly Lemire

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

textilescottonJapansixteenth–seventeenth centuriesEnglandsixteenth–seventeenth centuriesConsumerism, consumptionThe historical characteristics of consumer behavior have been the subject of intensive study for a generation.Among the pioneer studies see: Jan De Vries “Peasant Demand and Economic Development: Friesland 1559–1700,” in William Parker and E. L. Jones eds, European Peasants and their Markets, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975; Economic Policy and Projects: The Development of a

Gianfranco Ferré

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Introduction: Indian Fashion

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

While conducting research on the subject of fashion and dressdress it is not uncommon to come across significant variations in the way clothing terminology is applied and understood. Hence providing a framework of terms and definitions used throughout this book is a crucial starting point for this chapter. Outlining certain dress and fashion-related terms and their meanings, like costumecostume and traditional [dress], is also necessary as they have frequently been employed [historically] in acad

A Brief History of Dress, Difference and Fashion Change in India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

The assumption that the impetus for style change only came about during the presence of the British in India is largely untrue, as is the viewpoint that global interchange and fashion did not exist prior to the influence of contemporary forces of globalization. Indian clothing already included a diverse range of stitched and unstitched garments before European dress was introduced. Many of these had been fashioned by global interactions and local adaptations, stemming from the need to cater to In

Contemporary Fashion Practice in Urban India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

economic liberalization, India’semergence of new public spaces in urban IndiaLast Sunday I visited a nearby water theme park with my family and a family in the neighbourhood. We thoroughly enjoyed the day playing in water and going on scary rides… But always I am confused what dress I should wear in such places. My husband told me to put on a cotton three-fourth pants and tee shirt. I felt very comfortable in the water in that dress... Some orthodox Muslim women were in Burqa and I was wondering

Reel to Real Life: Re-Fashioning India from Bollywood to Street

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

Cinema in India is an extremely influential cultural medium. India has the world’s largest film industry with over 1,000 films produced every year in more than 20 languagesIbid. and over 14 million Indians go to the movies on a daily basis.In 2008 the industry was valued at approximately US$2.2 billion, and expected to grow by 9 percent p.a. till 2015 (Deloitte 2011 report: “Media & Entertainment in India Digital Road Ahead.” www.deloitte.com/in [accessed June 4, 2013]) Many more watch them at ho

Desi-Chic: The Image and Ideals of Fashion in Indian Magazines

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

The evolution of a distinctive visual identity within the local fashion design industry that responds to Indian tastes, traditions and crafts, along with the presence of international fashion brands in India have not only led to a shift in the sartorial landscape, they have also had an impact on the image and representation of fashion. This was evident in the discussion over the previous chapter with regard to film, television and emerging spheres of fashion blogging, and is also mirrored in prin

Darzi to “Designer”: Crafting Couture and High-Fashion for India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

Over the past 20 years, the field of fashion in India has changed significantly. We see a shift from an industry that solely supported Western markets through exports, to an fashion design, Indianas a cultural activityfashion design, Indianindustry’s estimate worth (in 2012)fashion design, Indiankey distinguishing factorsfashion weeks, IndianFDCI (Fashion Design Council of India)industry that has begun to take Indian consumers, their tastes and their potential market base into consideration. Indi

Conclusion: “Wrapping it Up”

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

When I say Rani Pink to you, you get it. I don’t have to explain the shade to you. Your dadi or your nani would have passed it on to you.dadi–paternal grandmother, nani–maternal grandmother. You know it consciously and unconsciously. (Garg 2013)Cited from “Raw Mango: A Conversation with Sanjay Garg.” Park Magazine, Vol. 8, 2013, “Color,” p. 31. Available from http://www.theparkhotels.com/living-magazine.html (accessed July 17, 2013).

Dress and Textiles in Transition: The Sungudi Sari Revival of Tamilnadu, India

Kala Shreen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

What is sungudi? A craftsperson ties a thread around a tiny portion of fabric, knots it tightly and repeats. Once the fabric is dyed and the knots untied, the previously knotted areas will transform into tiny dots (Plate 24. Traditionally sungudi was used for cotton saris. Thousands of such dots decorate a sungudi sari; it contains 20,000 knots on average. Depending on the number of knots tied, a sungudi sari may take seven to fifteen days to make. According to the documents produced by the Gover

The People and Places of Costume Production

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume 2014

Book chapter

Cultural fields are vulnerable to the effects of time in that no field can be expected to remain the same, even as its products and its rationale appear consistent. The essential framework of costume production in Mumbai has remained the same for nearly one hundred years, including its institutional figures (on-set costumers, or dressmen) and local economic contingencies (the vast number and versatility of tailors in the city). But any conversation with retired personnel brings to light the chang

Costume and Character: Wearing and Being

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume 2014

Book chapter

My clothes may express the dressmaker, but they don’t express me.

Costume and the Body

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume 2014

Book chapter

The difference between a costume designer and fashion designer? The boutiques, they can just provide you with a salwar kurta, but not a good fit. For a film you require to be perfect. If you have a defect on the shoulders, if you have a defect on your arm, if you have a defect on your waist or hips, it is the costume designer who has to work on that and see how you are looking. Whatever defect is there in your body has to be removed.

Fashion and Spectacle

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume 2014

Book chapter

Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.

Dressing the Past

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume 2014

Book chapter

The demands of costuming for period films are, in some ways, comparable to those for contemporary films. At the same time, they are distinctly different, since the clothes must evoke in viewers a sense of a past of which they typically have little or no direct experience.This is the “veridiction contract” (Calefato 2004, 92), which refers to the production of “truth” within constrained social and historical circumstances. In other words, not only must what is considered to be true conform to cert

Beyond the Screen

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume 2014

Book chapter

Who ever saw his old clothes—his old coat, actually worn out, resolved into its primitive elements, so that it was not a deed of charity to bestow it on some poor boy…

Introduction

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

We arrived at the opulent bazaars that form the centre of Istanbul, a solidly constructed stone labyrinth in the Byzantine style which served as a vast shelter from the daytime heat. Its huge galleries of arched and vaulted ceilings supported by sculpted pillars were in colonnades, each dedicated to particular kinds of merchandise. Most remarkable were the clothes and the female slippers [babouches], fabrics embroidered or in lamé, cashmeres, carpets, gold, silver or opal-encrusted furniture, the

Early Orientalism and the Barbaresque

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

Just to what extent Justinian was instrumental in the demystification of silk within Europe is debatable, because the fibres of the highest quality still emanated from elsewhere: the Middle East and Cathay. Silks had always been the commodity of choice for the Roman citizenry and aristocracy. Although the earliest dates of trade with Asia and the Middle East are uncertain, they can be traced to as far back as the fourth century bc, when the commerce was predominately with India and Persia. China

Crossing Genders, Crossing Cultures

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

In every human being a vacillation from one sex to the other takes place, and often it is only the clothes that keep the male or female likeness, while underneath the sex is the very opposite of what is above.

The Limits of Jeans in Kannur, Kerala

Daniel Miller

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

Within the context of a study of global denim, South Asia is significant in representing perhaps the only remaining major region of the world where the wearing of jeans remains relatively uncommon. No one place can stand for South Asia, but an advantage of Kannur, a town in northern Kerala, is that at least for that state, it represents in the minds of its inhabitants, a clear position midway between the cosmopolitanism of the metropolis and the conservatism of the countryside. As such, many peop

Diverting Denim: Screening Jeans in Bollywood

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

During a research visit to Bombay in 2008, I asked a young costume assistant, as we sat talking in a suburban Bombay coffee house, how often she had sourced jeans for films. She replied: ‘Denim is big in films. Our actors are wearing denim throughout the film. They have to have jeans, unless they are wearing a suit. I cannot think of a film where we haven’t used jeans, even actresses.’

Ladakh

Monisha Ahmed

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Situated in the upper reaches of the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges, Ladakh is India’s high-altitude border region, characterized by an extraordinary desertlike landscape where barren mountains thrust toward an intensely blue sky, punctuated by green oases that reveal human habitation. Living in extreme weather conditions where temperatures drop to minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 50 degrees Celsius) in winter and rise to 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius)in summer, Ladakh’s i

Himalayan Buddhist Communities

Monisha Ahmed

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress among the Himalayan Buddhist communities of India reflects the physical, socioeconomic and cultural environment prevalent there. The fabrics used for clothing extend from elaborately patterned silk brocade garments to simple homespun materials. Tibetan styles have predominantly influenced the dress worn in these areas. The men of Lahaul, Spiti, and Kinnaur in Himachal Pradesh wear woolen caps and coats, cotton shirts, and trousers. In Kinnaur female dress comprises Tibetan-style robes with

Jewelry of Indo-Pakistan and Bangladesh

Usha Bala

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The vibrant tradition of Indian jewelry spans five thousand continuous years. Ancient Indians wore jewels of natural materials like shells and tusks, thought to have magical properties. Precious metals were coveted. Gold was regarded as a symbol of the sun; chandi, the term for silver, came from the Sanskrit chandra, meaning moon. Metals were regularly melted. Remarkably well-preserved gold and silver items excavated at Taxila, in modern-day Pakistan, constitute the largest cache of jewelry survi

Sari

Mukulika Banerjee and Daniel Miller

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

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