Results: Text (89) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 89 (4 pages)
    Page 1 of 4
Fashion, Whisky and ‘Muscular’ Neo-Royals

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The final chapter turns to the world of elite men and the balancing acts of masculinity that they perform in order to cultivate their image of power.The role played by the ‘rhetoric of muscularity’ is investigated, as is the threat of effeminacy, stemming among other things from their indulgence in luxury and consumption. In order to counteract this threat, men appropriate symbols of low class machismo and incorporate them in the elitist aesthetic, in a similar way in which they use ‘dirty’ subst

Conclusion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The conclusion reviews the central points of the work, focusing especially on the power dynamics between the producers and designers, the poor and the rich, the rise of expert privilege and the logic of philanthrocapitalism as an instrument of power. It claims that the current philanthrocapitalism that has taken elite India by storm is deeply neo-feudal in its nature while being wrapped up in rhetoric of good intentions. As such it is a telling sign of the times of brutally rising socio-economic

Producing Cosmopolitanism, Hierarchy and Social Cohesion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The second chapter develops the theme of imagined economy and India’s superpowerdom by focusing on the symptomatic commodification of past and heritage in fashion design. It does so by zooming onto the complex material and ideological production of traditional chikan embroidery from Lucknow, a city remembered for its past opulence, cosmopolitanism and luxurious lifestyle. It traces the movement of this embroidery, popular with India’s leading designers, from the local networks of its material pro

Neo-Feudal Ornamentalism and Elitist Fantasies

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The first chapter introduces the Indian fashion industry, the dominant neo-aristocratic aesthetics in contemporary luxury fashion design and the recent intensification of the business elites’ obsession with displays of opulent Indianness and their desire to master time and space through conspicous displays of status. It walks the reader through three key rituals. First, the interactions between designers and their clients in the studios, where they ‘celebrate Indianness’ together. Second, the fas

Charitable Non-Love and Philanthrocapitalism

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 4 further develops the theme of power relations between design and craft and between the rich and the poor. Many designers working with craftspeople also run non-governmental organizations to ‘empower’ these workers, while cultivating the rhetoric of ethical business and philanthropy, and offering their customers in addition to luxurious clothing also good conscience. Such NGOs and trusts become effective tools of co-option of the village workforce into the capitalist system and reproduce

Erotic Capital and Benevolence of Vampish Goddesses

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 6 deals with elite women and their utilization of designer fashion in claiming social power and cultivating erotic capital. Designers in collaboration with their elite female clients develop the cultural tropes of the courtesans and the benevolent goddesses in order to enhance the women’s power in the business sphere dominated by men. Carving a space for themselves in the business world or public life, while being good and moral wives is problematic. In order to be both moral and sexy, th

Design Genius and his Ghost Others

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The third chapter turns to the tensed relations between design and craft. Developing further the case of chikan embroidery, as it moves from villages to fashion boutiques, the chapter analyses the ways in which material labour is artificially separated from immaterial labour. It shows how the designers’ narratives about creativity, innovation and artistic genius systematically push craftspeople into invisibility, inferiority and passivity, and deny their creativity, individuality and agency. The

Introduction

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

White Lotus, the theme of the funeral that has transported us into the world of fashion designers and the South Delhi business elite, is a fitting metaphor for the key motif of this book. It is also a fitting metaphor for the ethnographic journey in which this work is grounded and for its analytical angle. Like the lotus, the beauties ritualof Indian fashion and heritage luxuryheritage luxury cannot be conceived without their juxtaposition, without the mud from which they grow and that brings the

Insubordinations of the Laughing Craftswoman

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter returns back to the villages surrounding Lucknow, where women embroider the luxurious fabrics for the elites while being patronized by the designers, their NGOs and discourses of ‘ethical business’. Recognizing the destructive power of such efforts and the potential violence inherent in benevolence, the craftswomen use often irony and laughter when confronted with patronizing discourses that position them as vulnerable, poor and in constant need of rescue. They mock the designers and

The BRIC Countries and Trends

Jenny Lantz

Source: The Trendmakers. Behind the Scenes of the Global Fashion Industry, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Vogue India’s Trend Report appendix for May 2012: The predominately European fashions are sorted into the categories “Loud and Proud,” “Sugar Rush” and “Citrus Punsch.” One startling article features the kurta, a typically Indian garment like a long shirt or tunic, worn by both women and men: “The Indian classic has gone global. International runways showed various versions of the kurta, a must-have for all shapes.” The pictures from Céline, Anna Sui, Junya Watanabe, Louis Vuitton and Dries van N

Internationalization of Retailing

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

Asia and Australia

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

Being Fashionable in the Globalization Era in India: Holy Writing on Garments

Janaki Turaga

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Using a case study of ‘holy fashion’ in India, Janaki Turaga explores why this has become so popular in a nation that is grappling with rapid modernization and globalization amid the retention of the traditions and heritage of ancient India. Indicatively, fashion-conscious Indians have embraced a diverse range of ‘secularised sacred’ fashion garments that were previously reserved for believers in culturally prescribed sacred contexts in order to demonstrate fashion and lifestyle statements. Garme

India

Shubhapriya Bennur and Jaya Halepete Iyer

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Indiaoverview and historyemerging marketsIndiaIndiaretailersin IndiaAfter reading this chapter, you will

Fashion Politics and Practice: Indian Cottons and Consumer Innovation in Tokugawa Japan and Early Modern England, C. 1600–1800

Beverly Lemire

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

textilescottonJapansixteenth–seventeenth centuriesEnglandsixteenth–seventeenth centuriesConsumerism, consumptionThe historical characteristics of consumer behavior have been the subject of intensive study for a generation.Among the pioneer studies see: Jan De Vries “Peasant Demand and Economic Development: Friesland 1559–1700,” in William Parker and E. L. Jones eds, European Peasants and their Markets, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975; Economic Policy and Projects: The Development of a

Gianfranco Ferré

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Introduction: Indian Fashion

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

While conducting research on the subject of fashion and dressdress it is not uncommon to come across significant variations in the way clothing terminology is applied and understood. Hence providing a framework of terms and definitions used throughout this book is a crucial starting point for this chapter. Outlining certain dress and fashion-related terms and their meanings, like costumecostume and traditional [dress], is also necessary as they have frequently been employed [historically] in acad

A Brief History of Dress, Difference and Fashion Change in India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The assumption that the impetus for style change only came about during the presence of the British in India is largely untrue, as is the viewpoint that global interchange and fashion did not exist prior to the influence of contemporary forces of globalization. Indian clothing already included a diverse range of stitched and unstitched garments before European dress was introduced. Many of these had been fashioned by global interactions and local adaptations, stemming from the need to cater to In

Contemporary Fashion Practice in Urban India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

economic liberalization, India’semergence of new public spaces in urban IndiaLast Sunday I visited a nearby water theme park with my family and a family in the neighbourhood. We thoroughly enjoyed the day playing in water and going on scary rides… But always I am confused what dress I should wear in such places. My husband told me to put on a cotton three-fourth pants and tee shirt. I felt very comfortable in the water in that dress... Some orthodox Muslim women were in Burqa and I was wondering

Reel to Real Life: Re-Fashioning India from Bollywood to Street

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Cinema in India is an extremely influential cultural medium. India has the world’s largest film industry with over 1,000 films produced every year in more than 20 languagesIbid. and over 14 million Indians go to the movies on a daily basis.In 2008 the industry was valued at approximately US$2.2 billion, and expected to grow by 9 percent p.a. till 2015 (Deloitte 2011 report: “Media & Entertainment in India Digital Road Ahead.” www.deloitte.com/in [accessed June 4, 2013]) Many more watch them at ho

Desi-Chic: The Image and Ideals of Fashion in Indian Magazines

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The evolution of a distinctive visual identity within the local fashion design industry that responds to Indian tastes, traditions and crafts, along with the presence of international fashion brands in India have not only led to a shift in the sartorial landscape, they have also had an impact on the image and representation of fashion. This was evident in the discussion over the previous chapter with regard to film, television and emerging spheres of fashion blogging, and is also mirrored in prin

Darzi to “Designer”: Crafting Couture and High-Fashion for India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Over the past 20 years, the field of fashion in India has changed significantly. We see a shift from an industry that solely supported Western markets through exports, to an fashion design, Indianas a cultural activityfashion design, Indianindustry’s estimate worth (in 2012)fashion design, Indiankey distinguishing factorsfashion weeks, IndianFDCI (Fashion Design Council of India)industry that has begun to take Indian consumers, their tastes and their potential market base into consideration. Indi

Conclusion: “Wrapping it Up”

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

When I say Rani Pink to you, you get it. I don’t have to explain the shade to you. Your dadi or your nani would have passed it on to you.dadi–paternal grandmother, nani–maternal grandmother. You know it consciously and unconsciously. (Garg 2013)Cited from “Raw Mango: A Conversation with Sanjay Garg.” Park Magazine, Vol. 8, 2013, “Color,” p. 31. Available from http://www.theparkhotels.com/living-magazine.html (accessed July 17, 2013).

Dress and Textiles in Transition: The Sungudi Sari Revival of Tamilnadu, India

Kala Shreen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

What is sungudi? A craftsperson ties a thread around a tiny portion of fabric, knots it tightly and repeats. Once the fabric is dyed and the knots untied, the previously knotted areas will transform into tiny dots (Plate 24. Traditionally sungudi was used for cotton saris. Thousands of such dots decorate a sungudi sari; it contains 20,000 knots on average. Depending on the number of knots tied, a sungudi sari may take seven to fifteen days to make. According to the documents produced by the Gover

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 89 (4 pages)
Page 1 of 4