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Bridal Dress in Korea

Na Young Hong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Traditional Korean lifestyles began changing with the opening of Korea to the outside world in the late nineteenth century. The first Western wedding in Korea took place in 1890; it took nearly seventy years for most Koreans to accept this style. Traditional ceremonies began giving way to Western-style weddings with the inflow of Western culture into Korea since the mid-1950s. Pyebaek, part of the traditional ceremony in which brides kowtow to the grooms’ intimate elders, remained until the early

Overview of Korea: Traditional

Lee Kyung Ja

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic styles of hanbok, or Korean traditional dress, were established at a very early date and have remained essentially unchanged to the present day. The styles developed among steppe nomadic cultures and were introduced to the Korean peninsula probably during the first century b.c.e. Mural paintings from the walls of Goguryeo kingdom (37 b.c.e. to 668 c.e.) tombs dating from the late fourth to the sixth centuries c.e. show clearly the early forms of male and female dress: Men wear baji, or

Body Concepts in Korea and North Asia

Jaehee Jung

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although concepts of Korean female beauty have changed during the five-thousand-year history of the peninsula, these ideals have always been deeply embedded in the daily lives of women. Historically, they have been largely shaped by two influences from China: notions of famed female beauties and Confucian modesty. The theme of beautiful women formed an important genre of poetry and literature, as well as painting, in China and in the East Asian cultures influenced by it. These images, while often

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

Garment Manufacture and Retailing in Korea

Geum Key-Sook

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Since the mid-twentieth century, Korea’s garment industry has grown remarkably. Its fashion industry has expanded globally, with both domestic brands and foreign boutiques. Although Western clothing only appeared in Korea in the early twentieth century, its influence has spread to become a major national industry. The garment factories’ high productivity contributed to the country’s growth during the 1970s. Although many Koreans wore hanbok (Korean traditional dress) into the twentieth century, t

Overview of Korea: Modern

Min-Ja Kim

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Gapsin Reform in 1884, prompted by a coup d’état staged by a group of reformists called the Progressives, initiated the transformation of Korea into a modern society by diffusing foreign ideas and cultures. Western fashion, as a symbol of modernization, became widespread in everyday life, supplanting the traditions that had dominated Korea’s clothing system for hundreds of years. During the twentieth century, the five-thousand-year-old traditional dress culture was made over through an accult

Textile Manufacture in Korea

Juyeon Park, Marilyn DeLong and Eunah Yoh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the twenty-first century, Korea’s textilemanufacture is known for two distinctive features: One is exquisite textile art products, such as sumptuous embroidery, delicate hanbok (a general term for traditional Korean dress for both men and women) designs, and luxurious fabrics; and the other is the country’s rapid economic development, particularly in the second half of the twentieth century. The origins of both features of textile manufacture may be found in five thousand years of Korean histo

Archaeological Evidence: Korea

Seongsil Park

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Paleolithic period people settled in the Korean Peninsula 40,000 to 50,000 years ago. The relationship of these peoples to contemporary Korean populations is unknown. Between 6,000 and 2,000 years ago, Neolithic migrations from Northeast Asia, Siberia, and Central Asia brought new populations to Korea. Chulmun, or “comb-marked,” pottery people, left evidence of sewing tools in the form of bone needles and a variety of shell disks and beads, although no garments have been recovered that date from

Historical Evidence: Korea

Seongsil Park

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Chinese neo-Confucianism was adopted by Emperor Taejo (1335–1408), the founder of the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910). Society, including dress, was carefully regulated. Members of the court were classified into nine ranks. Gwanbok, or official dress, included separate wardrobes for court ceremonials, religious rites, and official and ordinary work, and there were rigorous sumptuary laws. In addition to pictorial and written documentation, there are numerous examples of garments and accessories as evi

Footwear

Elizabeth Semmelhack

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Traditional footwear in Asia is diverse and reflects historical and cultural developments across this vast region. While most footwear has its origins in the particulars of daily life, such as the rigid-soled boots for northern horse riders using stirrups or rough plaited straw sandals that gave farmers extra traction on wet or slippery surfaces, throughout most societies, decisions about wearing or not wearing footwear, or when to wear it, were determined by other factors, including custom, soci

Geographic and Cultural Introduction

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The region of continental and insular East Asia and Inner Asia is vast in terms of both time and space. The recorded history of the region is measured in millennia, rather than centuries. Dress is widely diverse, as are the people who created it. Historically, Chinese civilization, which traces a continuous development over four millennia, has dominated the region and has influenced the attire and attitudes about dress of many of China’s neighboring states. Yet even Chinese dress is far from mono

International Fashion in East Asia

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The activities of Western merchants, missionaries, and adventurers have been recorded in Chinese historical literature since the Tang dynasty (618–907), but not until the sixteenth century did Western dress became a factor in the region’s history. Gradually, Western customs, including clothing, came to be considered essential components of modernization. World War II and its aftermath accelerated the adoption of Western dress in East Asia. In most places national or regional dress is now deemed “

Korean Wedding Dress from the Chosun Dynasty (1392–1910) to the Present

Na Young Hong

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures 2003

Book chapter

During the Chosun dynasty, matchmakers arranged marriages. When both families agreed, a letter which contained the year, month, date, and hour of a prospective groom’s birth was sent to the bride’s family. The acceptance of the letter by the bride’s family officially sealed the engagement and the groom and the bride became betrothed without knowing each other. The bride’s parents used the letter to consult horoscopes in order to predict the harmony between the couple and, if auspicious, set a wed

Confucianism Manifested in Korean Dress from the Sixteenth to Seventeenth Centuries

Inwoo Chang and Haekyung L. Yu

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

The basic garments in Korean traditional dress consist of two pieces, a top and a bottom. The top is a caftan-style jacket or blouse called jogori. Both men and women wear jogori regardless of age and socio-economic status. With jogori men wear pants called baji, and women wear skirts called chima. On top of these basic garments, people can wear a variety of po (coat or robe-type outer wear) depending on the weather and occasion. In addition to these basic garments, there are several important ce

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