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Performance Dress in China and Taiwan

Alexandra B. Bonds, Dongshin Chang and Elizabeth Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Over three hundred forms of indigenous theater entertainment incorporating song and music have evolved in China, with different forms of music-dramas being performed in specific regions throughout the country. Among these forms, Kunqu (songs of Kunshan) took shape in the Lower Yangtze region of China in the mid-sixteenth century, attained national popularity in the following two centuries, and is still thriving in the early twenty-first century. Jingju (capital drama), commonly known in the West

Overview of Taiwan

Ching-Yi Cheng and Hsu-Chun Su

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The impact of Confucian philosophy on all aspects of Chinese life is evident in the attire of the Han people of Taiwan, specifically as regards the notion of the Doctrine of the Mean, which emphasizes personal introspection and emotional control, focused on cultural nurturing and the rejection of human vanity. Dress preserves modesty by covering the body and obscuring its shape. Importance is placed on inner beauty, the term for which literally means “charm”—the spiritual and cultural quality hop

Textile Manufacture in Taiwan

Yu Cheng-Ping and Wu Chi-Jen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Before the Qing dynasty (1644–1911) ceded Taiwan to Japan in 1895, Taiwan’s economy was based on agriculture. Its environment was not suitable for planting cotton or raising sheep. Other than domestic, self-sufficient textile production, there was no textile industry. The demand for textiles relied on imports from the mainland. This changed radically beginning in 1896 with the Japanese colonization of Taiwan. Taiwan’s textile industry can be divided into five periods: (1) Japanese colonial period

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

Aboriginal Dress in Taiwan

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

According to the 2006 census, the total population of Taiwan’s recognized aboriginal peoples is 485,000, approximately two percent of the population. Historically these peoples occupied land spread over much of the island; however, since the seventeenth century their interaction with colonizing powers has resulted in the concentration of populations in the mountains of eastern Taiwan. One consequence of this is the distinction made by Han Chinese administrators during the eighteenth century betwe

Geographic and Cultural Introduction

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The region of continental and insular East Asia and Inner Asia is vast in terms of both time and space. The recorded history of the region is measured in millennia, rather than centuries. Dress is widely diverse, as are the people who created it. Historically, Chinese civilization, which traces a continuous development over four millennia, has dominated the region and has influenced the attire and attitudes about dress of many of China’s neighboring states. Yet even Chinese dress is far from mono

Garment Manufacture and Retailing in Taiwan

Yeung Wai-Hon

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Virtually no mass-scale textiles and garment industry existed in Taiwan before World War II. One could hardly find a Western fashion magazine or a fashion department store in Taiwan prior to the 1980s. Until then, small-scale custom tailors, haute couture, and imported garments through professional franchisees or agencies were the major sources of the higher-end market. Inspirations for garment design before the 1970s were primarily sparked by Western styles.

Body Modification: Tattooing

Mieko Yamada

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tattooing is a type of body adornment inscribed on the skin. In East Asia, where Confucianism strongly influences many cultures, there are multiple meanings of the tattooing practice: cosmetic purposes, social status, tribal customs, criminal association, and crime punishment. However, Confucian doctrine claims that bodies are given to people by their parents and that intentionally hurting bodies is contrary to the Confucian concept of filial piety. Therefore, although tattooed bodies are acknowl

Historical Evidence: Taiwan

Ho Zhaohua

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Taiwanese dress has been deeply influenced by politics and history. Taiwan’s location approximately 150 kilometers (93 miles) off the southeastern coast of China has over the centuries both linked it to and separated it from mainland East Asia. It continues to be a major factor in the geopolitics of the region in the early twenty-first century. Taiwan’s location on major maritime trading routes from Southeast Asia, Indonesia, China, Korea, Japan, and the Ryukyu Islands has also imp

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