Results: Text (8) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 8 of 8 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Dress of the Exile: Tibetan

Monisha Ahmed and Susan Vickery

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The most enduring symbol of Tibet’s struggle for freedom is its national flag—a mountain with two snow lions in the foreground and in the background the sun, surrounded by red and blue bands. With the words “Free Tibet” added, it is embroidered onto T-shirts, screen-printed on bags, made into labels for shawls, and knitted into hats and baby sweaters. The design of the flag dates from the seventh century, when various regiments within the Tibetan army had military flags depicting single or paired

Tibetan Jewelry

John Clarke

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Tibet before the Chinese invasion, jewelry, together with ornamented objects used in everyday life such as purses and chatelaines, formed the most visible statements of a person’s wealth and status. The nobility, consisting of a relatively small number of families, was able to afford the most lavishly decorated and finely worked pieces. Laymen drawn from the upper class, together with monastic officials with whom they worked in tandem, formed part of the Dalai Lama’s government. Since the time

Tibetan Minorities

Phila McDaniel

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tang dynasty (618–907) Chinese records draw a distinction between Tibetans who settled in villages and those who practiced a nomadic way of life. The Old Tibetan Chronicle, probably compiled between 800 and 840, recounts how Gnam-ri-slon-rtsan (King Namri Longstan, d. 629) organized poor southern Tibetan farmers to take over present-day Ü-Tsang by driving the wealthy herders northward onto the high plateau. The Lhasa region thus became the home of Tibetan agrarian and urban culture, while the her

Overview of Tibet

Valrae Reynolds

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tibetans live in the highest populated region on Earth, at altitudes of four thousand to fifteen thousand feet (twelve hundred to forty-five hundred meters), isolated from their neighbors to the west, south, and east by even higher mountain ranges and from the north by forbidding deserts. To live successfully in this extreme environment, Tibetans have developed distinctive garments. Nevertheless, components of Tibetan dress reflect the clothing traditions of the diverse civilizations of Eurasia.

Archaeological Evidence: Tibet

Valrae Reynolds

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Geography and climate make Tibet an ideal area for archaeological preservation. The remote plateaus and isolated valleys have seen little human intervention to disturb sites. The cold, dry climate and often high salt content in the soil can keep buried textiles and other fragile materials in amazingly pristine condition for centuries. However, elaborate burials with dressed corpses and assemblages of material goods were the custom in Tibet only for royalty and nobility and only prior to the mid-n

Historical Evidence: Tibet

Valrae Reynolds

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

There is evidence of human habitation in Tibet since Neolithic times. Despite geographical isolation, Tibetans had links with ancient Eastern and European cultures. Chinese records from the seventh to tenth centuries, while emphasizing the civilizing Chinese influence on Tibetans, provide significant information. Homespun woolens have been excavated from Neolithic and later sites. Imported luxuries, especially silk, feature prominently in Tibetan texts. After the Tibetan empire collapsed in the n

Footwear

Elizabeth Semmelhack

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Traditional footwear in Asia is diverse and reflects historical and cultural developments across this vast region. While most footwear has its origins in the particulars of daily life, such as the rigid-soled boots for northern horse riders using stirrups or rough plaited straw sandals that gave farmers extra traction on wet or slippery surfaces, throughout most societies, decisions about wearing or not wearing footwear, or when to wear it, were determined by other factors, including custom, soci

Geographic and Cultural Introduction

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The region of continental and insular East Asia and Inner Asia is vast in terms of both time and space. The recorded history of the region is measured in millennia, rather than centuries. Dress is widely diverse, as are the people who created it. Historically, Chinese civilization, which traces a continuous development over four millennia, has dominated the region and has influenced the attire and attitudes about dress of many of China’s neighboring states. Yet even Chinese dress is far from mono

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 8 of 8 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1