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Caribbean Islanders

José F. Blanco

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Caribbean immigrants have contributed greatly to the multicultural and multilingual diversity of the United States and Canada for a number of years. Often grouped either with other Hispanics or with African Americans, Caribbean people are actually part of a complex mosaic of cultures, languages, and dress practices. The Caribbean, named after its main pre-Columbian inhabitants, the Carib, has been shaped by the encounter of several cultures, including native groups such as the Puerto Rican Taínos

Film and Fashion

Alba F. Aragón

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Attempting a full account of film and fashion in the two dozen nations of Latin America is a daunting task. The mere concept of regional and even national cinemas in Latin America is subject to debate, while the question of what Latin American fashion is has only begun to be addressed by scholars. The development of film in Latin America has been uneven and multifaceted. Often, films produced in Latin America have been purveyors of foreign fashion trends. Occasionally, they have sought to documen

Caribbean Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Since the sixteenth century, many types of headpieces have been worn by Caribbean islanders, depending on various factors including ethnicity, climate, and communal events. European colonizers usually brought and wore hats and styles from their respective countries. They generally became the ruling elite, their headwear communicating their status, and Creoles (descendants of European settlers) usually wore European styles. The headgear that arrived during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

Guayaberismo and the Essence of Cool

Marilyn Miller

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Of all animals, man is the only one who has not been granted a natural suit.

Transvestite Pedagogy: Jacqueline and Cuban Culture

James J. Pancrazio

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

That things are not always what they seem – or that seeming itself, the mirage or camouflage, was all there was to see …

Cuba

Araceli Tinajero

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Cuba is one of the largest islands of the Caribbean and enjoys tropical weather all year round. Havana, the capital, was founded by the Spanish colonizers in 1519. Since then, the city has been one of the most important ports of entrance to Latin America. Spanish and other European vessels always carried shoes and apparel of all sorts to meet the demand of colonial aristocrats, merchants, clerks, and workers. In turn, European models were imitated and then altered in order to produce original Cub

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