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Betsey Johnson, Spring/Summer 1986

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Presented at the Palladium nightclub in New York City, Betsey Johnson’s spring/summer 1986 collection depended on many of her signature tropes—her usual use of romantic stylings such as petticoats, crinolines, bustiers, and lace combine with kitschy accessories like kitchen utensils, baggie boxes as hats, baby bottle earrings, and feather dusters, creating a look that teases ideas of the feminine—the romantic femininity of the materials and silhouettes mixes with the traditionally female role of

The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: An Evolving History

Harold Koda and Jessica Glasscock

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

By 1938, 400 objects had been assembled and Bernstein was presenting a series of talks on costume history. Lewisohn headed the Museum’s committee, planning it as “a source of authentic information and inspiration to stylists, couturiers, designers, and manufacturers” (New York Times 1937: 28). They were joined by textile authority M.D.C. Crawford, who had been instrumental in starting the Design Laboratory (the Brooklyn Museum of Art’s costume study collection), the production designer Lee Simons

Vogue

Laird Borrelli

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion Cities

Christopher Breward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Western fashion is closely related to the history of urban life. As cultural geographer David Gilbert has claimed, this complex relationship underpins contemporary understandings of global fashion as a system orchestrated around a shifting network of world cities, particularly Paris, New York, London, Milan, and Tokyo but also incorporating (at various times) Moscow, Vienna, Berlin, São Paulo, Kuwait City, Cape Town, Barcelona, Antwerp, Delhi, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Hong Kong

Regional Differences in Dress and Fashion

Nancy O. Bryant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion professionals believe that there are regional differences in dress and fashion trends in the United States and Canada. However, objective data are hard to find, as scholars have paid little attention to regional differences within these territories. National retail firms are likely to evaluate sales in different regions in order to provide a range of stock that will appeal to their customers. Trade publications report the sales volume of items in various regions. Fashion reporters use the

Writing about Fashions

Sandra Stansbery Buckland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The twentieth century brought many innovations in the fashion world, and those innovations prompted many people to report on new fashions, to analyze them, and even to criticize them. Fashion was, and is, news. Fashion is both an artistic expression and a vital industry that makes significant contributions to a nation’s economy. And fashion is a sartorial mirror that reflects a culture’s values, beliefs, politics, and technologies. Fashion, then, can also be controversial. With so many facets to

Avedon, Richard

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Klein, Calvin

Gretchen Fenston and Beth Dincuff Charleston

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Klein’s designs, even in the excessive 1980s, continued to evoke a minimalist aesthetic, with a relatively restrained use of embellishment and color. The core of the collection was, as always, made up of timeless pieces in good fabrics. The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CDFA) recognized Klein when he won designer of the year awards in 1982 and 1983 for his women’s collection. Klein won a CFDA award in 1986 for both his men’s and women’s collections, the first time a designer had won bo

Lauren, Ralph

Michael Gross

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Even as a boy Lauren loved to dress well and was always a sartorial step ahead of his peers. He liked to try on his dapper father’s jaunty hats, and he wore his older brothers’ hand-me-downs with a notable sense of style. Even if his clothes were not expensive, he distinguished them with an unusual drape or combination. He knew how to tie a Shetland sweater around his shoulders just so and rolled the cuffs of his jeans in a particular and unique way. When he fantasized about being a teacher, he i

Seventh Avenue

Margot Siegel

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Valentina*

Kohle Yohannan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Born in 1904 in the Kiev region of Russia, Valentina escaped the revolution in the late teens with her new husband and soon-to-be business manager, George Schlée, arriving in America in 1923 after several years spent in Paris, Athens, and various other European cities. Much like the French designer Coco Chanel, who offered as many versions of her colorful past as her admirers cared to indulge, Valentina was prone to invent and embroider her early life as it suited her. As a result, Valentina’s or

Promoting American Designers, 1940–44: Building Our Own House

Sandra Stansbery Buckland

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Throughout the nineteenth century, the United States fashion industry developed expertise in the manufacturing, promoting and retailing of fashion apparel. Paris, however, dictated the design of fashionable women’s garments. By the beginning of the twentieth century there was a growing dissatisfaction with couturiers who ‘kept trying to replace the simple American shirtwaist and walking skirt with more ornate garments.’ This action brewed ‘the idea that there was a native American fashion suitabl

The Onondaga Silk Company’s ‘American Artist Print Series’ of 1947

Amy Lund and Linda Welters

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: After the Second World War ended in 1945, most Americans resumed family life. The GI Bill sent many veterans back to school to further their educations. Women gave up their wartime jobs and retreated to their homes to raise children.

Dress and Culture in Greenwich Village

Deborah Saville

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: When the Gilded Age ended on the eve of the First World War, some Americans expressed dissatisfaction with the conventional life. Intellectuals in Greenwich Village in New York City began to practice alternative lifestyles based on radical feminism and new psychological thought. As discussed by Deborah Saville, their style, identifiable as American bohemian, signified their ideological leanings. Young Greenwich Village women’s style included artists’ smocks, peasant blouses

The Beat Generation: Subcultural Style

Linda Welters

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: During the 1950s, Americans were conservative in their attitudes (Miller and Nowak 1977). They lived with the threat of the Cold War, the ‘Red Scare,’ and the atom bomb. The average family lived in the newly formed suburbs where mothers stayed at home and fathers headed off to work. On Sundays, families went to churches of predominantly Protestant denominations. Many middle-class men worked for ‘the organization’ and adopted corporate values as their own (Whyte 1956). Immig

How New York Stole Modern Fashion

Norma Rantisi

Source: Fashion’s World Cities 2006

Book chapter

The rise of the Garment District in its present location can be dated back to the early twentieth century and occurred in response to a number of related developments. Through much of the mid-to-late nineteenth century, the apparel industry was situated on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, which was a port of arrival for immigrants. At this location, the retailers and wholesalers who established the industry (many of whom were German Jewish immigrants) could easily tap into a readily available la

Curating the Fashion City: New York Fashion at the V&A

Sonnet Stanfill

Source: Fashion’s World Cities 2006

Book chapter

Important to a chronicle of New York fashion are the couture designs of Charles James. While James is perhaps best remembered for his extravagant eveningwear (his so-called Clover dress of 1953 is composed of thirty pattern pieces and layers of fabric (Martin 1997: 53)), he was also capable of stunning simplicity. The Museum does have examples of James’s elaborate eveningwear but the garment representing him in the gallery is a late 1930s coat, which is the model of restraint (Figure 5.1). The Mu

Sewing up Seven Cities

Jan Rath

Source: Unravelling the Rag Trade. Immigrant Entrepreneurship in Seven World Cities 2002

Book chapter

The world is in a state of flux. Capital, goods and people move around the globe, generating vast changes and linking distant social, political and economic configurations. The creation and preservation of economic ties over long distances is intriguing, but in themselves nothing new. In days of yore, merchants in pursuit of market expansion ventured on to the silk route, sailed to Hanseatic towns, embarked on colonial projects, or travelled Europe’s dirt roads as hawkers. The current internation

New York: Caught under the Fashion Runway

Yu

Source: Unravelling the Rag Trade. Immigrant Entrepreneurship in Seven World Cities 2002

Book chapter

New York City has been the centre of fashion in the United States since the late nineteenth century. As ready-made clothes became more accepted and celebrated as part of a way of life in the New World, New York rapidly became the indisputable centre for factory garment manufacturing. Immigrants have shaped the garment industry in New York City from its very start. Many immigrant groups in New York were involved in this trade, including Jews and Italians at the turn of the century, and newer Chine

Homosexuality Class and Dress

Shaun Cole

Source: ‘Don We Now Our Gay Apparel’. Gay Men’s Dress in the Twentieth Century 2000

Book chapter

We begged, borrowed or almost stole our fathers’, older brothers’, cousins’ battle dress tops – the tank tops, people would now say. But here the gay man started to stand out, or the young gay man. I wasn’t content to have that dreary khaki or the even the civil defence or fire fighters’ navy blue. I got the khaki, but you could at least have things dyed, and I had mine dyed a nice dark cherry red, burgundy.Cole interview with Peter Robins, 4 August 1997.

Down to Basics: Swimwear und Underwear

Shaun Cole

Source: ‘Don We Now Our Gay Apparel’. Gay Men’s Dress in the Twentieth Century 2000

Book chapter

Trash, Glamour, Punk

Shaun Cole

Source: ‘Don We Now Our Gay Apparel’. Gay Men’s Dress in the Twentieth Century 2000

Book chapter

In 1973 we renamed the shop ‘Too Fast to Live, Too Young to Die’. We were thinking of images like Rebel Without a Cause. Also about Kenneth Anger’s Scorpio Rising. This added homosexual and pornographic undercurrents to biker imagery. We also became interested in rubber and fetish clothing. The research we did for this led us into an underground fetish and sadomasochistic world. In those days not many people knew about that sort of thing. Malcolm found some under the counter catalogues with examp

Express Yourself: Clubbing at the Blitz, the Batcave, and Beyond

Shaun Cole

Source: ‘Don We Now Our Gay Apparel’. Gay Men’s Dress in the Twentieth Century 2000

Book chapter

Hard Boys: Masculine Appropriations in the 1980s

Shaun Cole

Source: ‘Don We Now Our Gay Apparel’. Gay Men’s Dress in the Twentieth Century 2000

Book chapter

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