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Sneakers as A Subculture: Emerging From Underground to Upperground

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It [subculture] has come to signify the twentieth-century category for youth groups who possess some sort of marked style and shared affiliations. Whereas sociologists use the term to describe an infinitely wider array of groups—sport fishermen, West Texas Baptists, or toy train hobbyists—“subculture” is more popularly used to characterize groups of young people. (Clark 2003: 223, footnote 2)

Scene from the Sidewalk: Shooting Street Style at New York Fashion Week

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In a Fashion Weekspectacle ofnow infamous New York Times T Magazine editorial entitled ‘The Circus of Fashion’, veteran fashion journalist Suzy Menkes, SuzyMenkes reminiscences about the relative austerity that used to define her industry. ‘We were once described as “black crows”, she writes, ‘ – us fashion folk gathered outside an abandoned, crumbling downtown building in a uniform of Comme des Garçons or Yohji Yamamoto, YohjiYamamoto. “Whose funeral is it?” passers-by would whisper with a mix o

“We Also Should Walk in the Newness of Life”: Individualized Harlem Style of the 1930s

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

With the visual arts of the 1920s and 1930s anchored by black peoples, we can recollect and reimagine this twentieth-century moment when Harlem was not only “in vogue”, or “on the minds” of a complacent few, but also a geo-political metaphor for modernity and an icon for an increasingly complex black diasporal presence in the world.

Betsey Johnson, Spring/Summer 1986

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Presented at the Palladium nightclub in New York City, Betsey Johnson’s spring/summer 1986 collection depended on many of her signature tropes—her usual use of romantic stylings such as petticoats, crinolines, bustiers, and lace combine with kitschy accessories like kitchen utensils, baggie boxes as hats, baby bottle earrings, and feather dusters, creating a look that teases ideas of the feminine—the romantic femininity of the materials and silhouettes mixes with the traditionally female role of

The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: An Evolving History

Harold Koda and Jessica Glasscock

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

By 1938, 400 objects had been assembled and Bernstein was presenting a series of talks on costume history. Lewisohn headed the Museum’s committee, planning it as “a source of authentic information and inspiration to stylists, couturiers, designers, and manufacturers” (New York Times 1937: 28). They were joined by textile authority M.D.C. Crawford, who had been instrumental in starting the Design Laboratory (the Brooklyn Museum of Art’s costume study collection), the production designer Lee Simons

Designer Perspective

Gabi Asfour and Adi Gil

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This New York City-based avant garde label was originally established in 1998 as ASFOUR, consisting of four designers: Gabi Asfour, Angela Donhauser, Adi Gil and Kai Khune. In 2001, the label won the Ecco Domani Fashion Grant given to innovative designers in the fashion industry. In 2005, Khune left the group to pursue his own label and the three remaining designers continued under the new title threeASFOUR. The experimental designs produced by threeASFOUR have been purchased and displayed by num

Designer Perspective

Maria Cornejo

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Maria Cornejo’s varied career spans London, Paris, Milan and Tokyo, where she was part of the ground-breaking design partnership Richmond Cornejo. She then developed her own signature ‘Maria Cornejo’ collection and worked as a creative consultant for major retailers Joseph, Tehen and Jigsaw.

Chapter six: Fashion in the Global Marketplace

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In the fashion business, everything is so temporary. Beautiful for three or four months, then you’re tired of it.

Point of View

Fiona Dieffenbacher (ed)

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Colleen Sherin, Senior Fashion Director Saks Fifth Avenue

Bonwit Teller

Ira Neimark

Source: The Rise of Fashion and Lessons Learned at Bergdorf Goodman, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

One month before I interviewed for my first job at Bonwit Teller, I camped out at the Hamilton employment agency waiting for an employment opportunity. It was October 1938. The world was still in the grip of the Great Depression, and I had just left high school.

Changing of the Guard at Bergdorf Goodman

Ira Neimark

Source: The Rise of Fashion and Lessons Learned at Bergdorf Goodman, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A photograph was taken of the top executives at Bergdorf Goodman. We sat together in Andrew Goodman’s office. It was January 29, 1975, and the occasion was the announcement of my appointment as president and chief executive officer.

Vogue

Laird Borrelli

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion Cities

Christopher Breward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Western fashion is closely related to the history of urban life. As cultural geographer David Gilbert has claimed, this complex relationship underpins contemporary understandings of global fashion as a system orchestrated around a shifting network of world cities, particularly Paris, New York, London, Milan, and Tokyo but also incorporating (at various times) Moscow, Vienna, Berlin, São Paulo, Kuwait City, Cape Town, Barcelona, Antwerp, Delhi, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Hong Kong

Regional Differences in Dress and Fashion

Nancy O. Bryant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion professionals believe that there are regional differences in dress and fashion trends in the United States and Canada. However, objective data are hard to find, as scholars have paid little attention to regional differences within these territories. National retail firms are likely to evaluate sales in different regions in order to provide a range of stock that will appeal to their customers. Trade publications report the sales volume of items in various regions. Fashion reporters use the

Writing about Fashions

Sandra Stansbery Buckland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The twentieth century brought many innovations in the fashion world, and those innovations prompted many people to report on new fashions, to analyze them, and even to criticize them. Fashion was, and is, news. Fashion is both an artistic expression and a vital industry that makes significant contributions to a nation’s economy. And fashion is a sartorial mirror that reflects a culture’s values, beliefs, politics, and technologies. Fashion, then, can also be controversial. With so many facets to

Avedon, Richard

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Klein, Calvin

Gretchen Fenston and Beth Dincuff Charleston

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Klein’s designs, even in the excessive 1980s, continued to evoke a minimalist aesthetic, with a relatively restrained use of embellishment and color. The core of the collection was, as always, made up of timeless pieces in good fabrics. The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CDFA) recognized Klein when he won designer of the year awards in 1982 and 1983 for his women’s collection. Klein won a CFDA award in 1986 for both his men’s and women’s collections, the first time a designer had won bo

Lauren, Ralph

Michael Gross

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Even as a boy Lauren loved to dress well and was always a sartorial step ahead of his peers. He liked to try on his dapper father’s jaunty hats, and he wore his older brothers’ hand-me-downs with a notable sense of style. Even if his clothes were not expensive, he distinguished them with an unusual drape or combination. He knew how to tie a Shetland sweater around his shoulders just so and rolled the cuffs of his jeans in a particular and unique way. When he fantasized about being a teacher, he i

Seventh Avenue

Margot Siegel

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Valentina*

Kohle Yohannan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Born in 1904 in the Kiev region of Russia, Valentina escaped the revolution in the late teens with her new husband and soon-to-be business manager, George Schlée, arriving in America in 1923 after several years spent in Paris, Athens, and various other European cities. Much like the French designer Coco Chanel, who offered as many versions of her colorful past as her admirers cared to indulge, Valentina was prone to invent and embroider her early life as it suited her. As a result, Valentina’s or

Promoting American Designers, 1940–44: Building Our Own House

Sandra Stansbery Buckland

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion, 2008, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Throughout the nineteenth century, the United States fashion industry developed expertise in the manufacturing, promoting and retailing of fashion apparel. Paris, however, dictated the design of fashionable women’s garments. By the beginning of the twentieth century there was a growing dissatisfaction with couturiers who ‘kept trying to replace the simple American shirtwaist and walking skirt with more ornate garments.’ This action brewed ‘the idea that there was a native American fashion suitabl

The Onondaga Silk Company’s ‘American Artist Print Series’ of 1947

Amy Lund and Linda Welters

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion, 2008, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: After the Second World War ended in 1945, most Americans resumed family life. The GI Bill sent many veterans back to school to further their educations. Women gave up their wartime jobs and retreated to their homes to raise children.

Dress and Culture in Greenwich Village

Deborah Saville

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion, 2008, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: When the Gilded Age ended on the eve of the First World War, some Americans expressed dissatisfaction with the conventional life. Intellectuals in Greenwich Village in New York City began to practice alternative lifestyles based on radical feminism and new psychological thought. As discussed by Deborah Saville, their style, identifiable as American bohemian, signified their ideological leanings. Young Greenwich Village women’s style included artists’ smocks, peasant blouses

The Beat Generation: Subcultural Style

Linda Welters

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion, 2008, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: During the 1950s, Americans were conservative in their attitudes (Miller and Nowak 1977). They lived with the threat of the Cold War, the ‘Red Scare,’ and the atom bomb. The average family lived in the newly formed suburbs where mothers stayed at home and fathers headed off to work. On Sundays, families went to churches of predominantly Protestant denominations. Many middle-class men worked for ‘the organization’ and adopted corporate values as their own (Whyte 1956). Immig

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