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Film and Fashion

Alba F. Aragón

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Attempting a full account of film and fashion in the two dozen nations of Latin America is a daunting task. The mere concept of regional and even national cinemas in Latin America is subject to debate, while the question of what Latin American fashion is has only begun to be addressed by scholars. The development of film in Latin America has been uneven and multifaceted. Often, films produced in Latin America have been purveyors of foreign fashion trends. Occasionally, they have sought to documen

South American Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Two basic factors influence clothing and headwear worn by South Americans; one derives from ancient indigenous cultures, and the other from cultural diffusion resulting from the conquest and colonization by the Spanish and Portuguese. Most South Americans today are of mixed racial heritage. The modern urban population usually wears European- or American-style manufactured clothing and headwear. In more isolated areas, characteristic head coverings are still worn, exemplified in three climate regi

Ponchos of the River Plate: Nostalgia for Eden

Ruth Corcuera

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Rooted in elements that define the Argentine patrimony, the poncho is present in our art, our literature, our songs. It speaks to us of Creole customs and its recollection fragments into infinite images. The poncho is, as is well known, a rectangular garment generally measuring 1.8 m by 1.4 m; it has an opening in the center enabling the wearer to pull it over his head and leave it resting on his shoulders, from which it falls in harmonious and baggy folds, amply covering the body and arms. Depen

Scattered Bodies, Unfashionable Flesh

Fabricio Forastelli

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

History of Dress in the Southern Cone

Carol García, Eva Medalla, Laura Novik and Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in the Southern Cone region, which includes Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and the southernmost regions of Brazil and Paraguay, has traditionally blended indigenous roots and foreign influences, both of which remain prevalent in today’s fashions. Several overlapping, significant historical tendencies in the region’s dress are discussed in order to elucidate the significance of these influences and fashion trends, especially Spanish and Portuguese colonial influences, the emergence of national c

Gaucho Dress

Moira F. Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Spanish introduced the horse and horned cattle to the New World, and the first horsemen of North and South America were the indigenous residents of the Pampas and plains. Later, the emigrants who dealt with these animals, from the southern gaucho to the northern cowboy, came to symbolize the region by their lifestyle and their dress. The earliest gauchos dealt in contraband hides and tallow, and were considered as vagabonds. Then, in the nineteenth century, they became soldiers in the wars fo

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

Dress and Fashion in Argentina

Laura Novik and Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Argentine fashion has often been intimately connected to the workings of culture, citizenship, and social change. Whether considering the elongated tortoiseshell hair combs from the nineteenth century or recycled garments from the 1980s, analysts of the multivalent characteristics of dress in Argentina, especially in the urban environs of Buenos Aires, address a host of social and political identities as well as larger cultural processes. When a scholar of Argentine fashion is asked to discuss te

Fashioning Independence: Gender, Dress and Social Space in Postcolonial Argentina

Regina A. Root

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

We can trace the evolution of the European hair comb into an elaborate and enlarged peinetón to the move for independence from Spain. The Spanish brought the first hair combs to Argentina in the eighteenth century. By the nineteenth century, Argentines looked to the fashions of France in an attempt to distance themselves from the customs they shared with the Spanish.For more on this theory, see López and Botalla (1983). The romantic rebellion in Europe had brought about several changes in fashion

Far Eastern Influences in Latin American Fashions

Araceli Tinajero

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Tailoring the Nation: Fashion Writing in Nineteenth-Century Argentina

Regina A. Root

Source: Fashioning the Body Politic. Dress, Gender, Citizenship 2002

Book chapter

In The Empire of Fashion, Gilles Lipovetsky (1994) pursues the evolution of modern democracy through the history of dress. He traces the rise of nationalist sentiments to the creation of national forms of dress in Europe of the Middle Ages. Fashion, he argues, ‘helped reinforce the awareness of belonging to a single political and cultural community.’ He continues: As a collective constraint, fashion actually left individuals with relative autonomy in matters of appearance; it instituted an unprec

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