Results: Text (7) Images (0)

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Gloves ‘of the Very Thin Sort’: Gifting Limerick Gloves in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Liza Foley

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Although leather was essential for the production of a wide range of eighteenth-century objects, including gloves, very little consideration has been given to the significance of the materiality of leather itself. As historian Giorgio Riello has shown, leather was a scarce material in pre-Industrial England. ‘Confined to the natural world and to a stable cattle asset’ (2008: 77), its production largely depended on the meat market, which, in the case of sheep, and to a greater extent cattle, accou

John Rocha

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Lainey Keogh

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Philip Treacy

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Wilde, Oscar

Christopher Breward

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Ireland

Síle de Cléir

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The situation regarding the various types of dress in Ireland in the period between the beginning of the nineteenth and the end of the twentieth centuries is a complex one. It is useful, perhaps, in this context to see dress in Ireland at this time as a continuum: folk dress at one end, characterized by locally produced fabrics and traditional aesthetics and deeply embedded in a local social and cultural context; and fashionable dress at the other, with a wider choice of materials and styles conn

Parcels from America: American Clothes in Ireland c.1930–1980

Hilary O’Kelly

Source: Old Clothes, New Looks. Second Hand Fashion, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

From Ireland the journey to America took weeks and even months by ship so that the people at home could only imagine what world their relations had gone to. The basis of their imagining came from letters home and through news gleaned from returned ‘Yanks’. But more abstract imaginings were inspired in other ways, through the dollars and the parcels that crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1