Results: Text (14) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 14 of 14 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Guiliano Fujiwara

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Etro

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Milan

Simona Segre Reinach

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The relevance of the city of Milan in the history of modern fashion is linked to the success of fashion designers’ prêt-à-porter in the mid-1970s and 1980s. This is a model of fashion production which became hegemonic in the global fashion industry. Ready-to-wear was invented in the U.S. in 1949, and the new system of production was diffused and renamed by the French as prêt-à-porter in the 1960s. It was only with the Milanese twist, though, that prêt-à-porter started to signify modern fashion to

Indigo Bodies: Fashion, Mirror Work and Sexual Identity in Milan

Roberta Sassatelli

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

Pondering over her wardrobe, Francesca, a stylish, freshly graduated woman in her mid-twenties, says that, whilst they are ‘vital’ to her, ‘Denim jeans just sit with the rest [of her clothes]: they are just in the middle of the mess, but I take them out much more often, so always know where they are’ (Interview 15). These few words allude to the particular position that jeans – normal and yet special – occupy in young people dressing practices. This partly reflects what youth from Milan participa

Fashion Cities

Christopher Breward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Western fashion is closely related to the history of urban life. As cultural geographer David Gilbert has claimed, this complex relationship underpins contemporary understandings of global fashion as a system orchestrated around a shifting network of world cities, particularly Paris, New York, London, Milan, and Tokyo but also incorporating (at various times) Moscow, Vienna, Berlin, São Paulo, Kuwait City, Cape Town, Barcelona, Antwerp, Delhi, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Hong Kong

Valentino*

Aurora Fiorentini

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1950 Valentino went to Paris, where he studied design at the schools of the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne. He obtained his first position as a designer with Jean Dessès. In 1957 Valentino went to work in Guy Laroche’s new atelier, where he remained for two years. His training in France provided him with both technical skill and a sense of taste. In 1959 he decided to return to Italy and opened his own fashion house on the via Condotti in Rome with financial assistance from his fam

Explore
Armani, Giorgio

Aurora Fiorentini

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The secret of Armani’s great success seems to derive from his having introduced, at the right moment, a new approach to clothing design that reflected the changes in post-1968 society, which was composed essentially of a middle class that could no longer afford to wear couture clothing but at the same time wanted to construct a distinctive image for itself. With this in mind, Armani established an innovative relationship with industry, characterized by the 1978 agreement with Gruppo finanzario T

Prada

John S. Major

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Italy

Elisabetta Merlo and Francesca Polese

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

If we use the expression Italian fashion to indicate the production of garments and accessories that are marked by distinctive and unique features universally associated with Italian culture and identity, then such a phenomenon appears only well after the political unification of the country (1861) and indeed is barely discernible prior to World War II. Moreover, even once the creations of Italian couturiers became celebrated in international markets beginning in the 1950s, Italy’s fashion scene

Milan as a Fashion City

Simona Segre Reinach

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The importance of the city of Milan in the history of modern fashion is linked to the success of a particular model of production and consumption: fashion designers’ prêt à porter. Milanese prêt-à-porter, appearing in the 1970s and peaking in the following decade, expressed the ability to produce in industrial quantities a fashion created in close collaboration with a fashion designer. A key figure in the Milanese system is the entrepreneur-designer, a novelty in the history of fashion. Due to th

Dolce & Gabbana

Simona Segre Reinach

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Milan: The City of Prêt-à-Porter in a World of Fast Fashion

Simona Segre Reinach

Source: Fashion’s World Cities 2006

Book chapter

Italian prêt-à-porter, which reached the peak of its success in the 1980s, is not a phenomenon that appeared from nowhere, so to speak. As White suggests in an important text devoted to the renaissance of Italian fashion (2000: 1–7), it has its roots in the post-war period, especially between 1945 and 1964, when, also thanks to American funding, the textile-clothing industry started up again at full capacity. Yet while it is right to speak of continuity regarding the capacity to produce clothing

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 14 of 14 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1