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Perspectives on Muslim Dress in Poland: A Tatar View

Katarzyna Górak-Sosnowska and Michał Łyszczarz

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Numbering around 3,000–5,000 people, Tatars constitute one of the smallest ethnic groups in Poland. Centuries of living in a mainstream Polish and Catholic society and being isolated from any other Tatar or Muslim population resulted in their losing a lot of their cultural heritage. However, it was not so much the pressure from the outside world as the willingness of Tatars to integrate, or even assimilate, that has informed Tatar clothing choices. Historically, soon after reaching Lithuania and

Poland: Ethnic Dress

Anita Broda

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

It is generally considered that peasants’ dress became distinct from that of other classes beginning in the fifteenth century. Dress quickly became a symbol of group values. A phenomenon typical in Polish folk culture was the borrowing of elements from higher classes, seen in folk dress with rich baroque detail. The peak development of folk dress in many parts of Poland occurred in the second half of the nineteenth century and was connected with peasants being granted the freehold of land; festiv

Polish Urban Dress in Transition from Socialism to Post-Socialism

Bogna Dowgiałło and Agnieszka Burska

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Material poverty and dramatically changed social structures influenced most Polish dress in the immediate postwar period. Because ethnic minorities had been either deported or exterminated and because both the Nazis and the Soviets had taken steps to eliminate the prewar elite, Polish society had become nearly homogenous.

Polish Youth Fashion under Socialism

Anna Pelka

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

After World War II, the Polish United Workers’ Party came to power in Poland. For the Communist authorities, educating young people in the Marxist and Leninist spirit was of particular importance. A Communist teenager was obliged to strengthen the system and the state as well as engage in activism through youth organizations. Clothing was also an element revealing the teen’s position in society. The government-promoted school or union uniform played an educational and social role, and its standar

Polish Fashion in the 1920s and 1930s

Anna Sieradzka

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Regaining national sovereignty in 1918 brought new political, social, economic, and cultural possibilities for the Poles. However, the new political independence did not mark a turning point in terms of the evolution of dress. For many decades, the upper and middle classes had already been closely following the shifts in Western fashions: French styles for women and English ones for men.

Geography and Climate: East Central Europe, the Baltic Countries, Russia, and the Caucasus

Pamela Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Central and East Europe extend from northern Germany to Russia’s Pacific coast. The expanse occupied today by Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia is punctuated only by the Ural Mountains. A wooded upland landscape covers the Czech Republic, rising eastward into the Carpathian Mountains. Much further east lie the Caucasus Mountains. For centuries the great plains offered easy access; evidence of Scythian dress has been found in southern Siberia, including shirts of Sib

Poland: Urban Dress up to 1900

Anna Straszewska

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the early sixteenth century, Renaissance styles became popular in Poland, with Eastern influences emerging from the union between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Hungarian connections were likewise significant, Hungary being influenced by the Orient through the Ottoman Empire. During the sixteenth century, Polish-Lithuanian noblemen started adopting Oriental attire called “Sarmatian dress,” believing themselves descendants of the ancient Sarmatians who, according to Pli

Gesture, Ritual, and Social Order in Sixteenth- to Eighteenth-Century Poland

Maria Bogucka

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Both manners and bodily comportment of a nobleman should be grave and full of dignity. Mikolaj Rej, a famous writer of noble origin, wrote in the middle of the seventeenth century:

Other Horsemen from the East: Uhlans and Cossacks

Thomas S. Abler

Source: Hinterland Warriors and Military Dress. European Empires and Exotic Uniforms 1999

Book chapter

He saw the lances rise and fall for a moment, and a friend of his went down. The horses began to rear and bite and kick, and man after man went down among their feet and he saw them trying to ward off the lances with their hands. And then the horse he had taken was killed by a thrust of a lance and he was down himself and thought he was done for, and lay there under the hoofs and heard the clash of arms, the shouting of men, the neighing and moaning of the horses.

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