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Slovak Embroidery

Oı’ga Danglová

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The oldest archeological evidence about embroidery in the territory of Slovakia dates to the third century b.c.e. In the Middle Ages, embroidery appeared on religious textiles and was worked by professional craftsmen. The first archive records about embroidery guilds in the territory of Slovakia date to the fifteenth century, referring to guilds of silk embroiderers in Košice and Bratislava. Inspired by the Renaissance penchant for luxury, embroidery was applied to clothing of the aristocracy and

Slovak Fashion after 1989

Zuzana Sidlikova

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The year 1989 was one of political changes for the Communist countries in East Europe, which also influenced the then-Czechoslovak textile and clothing industries. The companies, which had been operating under state rule since their nationalization in 1945–1948, became privately owned in 1991. COMECON (Council for Mutual Economic Assistance), the association through which the Soviet Union and East European Socialist countries traded between themselves, also disappeared. As a result of this disint

Geography and Climate: East Central Europe, the Baltic Countries, Russia, and the Caucasus

Pamela Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Central and East Europe extend from northern Germany to Russia’s Pacific coast. The expanse occupied today by Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia is punctuated only by the Ural Mountains. A wooded upland landscape covers the Czech Republic, rising eastward into the Carpathian Mountains. Much further east lie the Caucasus Mountains. For centuries the great plains offered easy access; evidence of Scythian dress has been found in southern Siberia, including shirts of Sib

Slovakia: Ethnic Dress

Patricia Williams

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Slovakia is a mountainous landlocked country in Central Europe, slightly larger than Switzerland. Slovaks have retained an enduring sense of their ethnicity, as manifested in the preservation of the Slovak language despite a turbulent history of foreign control and deprivation. They were under Hungarian and Austro-Hungarian rule from the tenth century until 1918, but, although their territory was called Upper Hungary, Slovaks never identified themselves as Hungarian, maintaining their Slovak iden

Variants of the Woman’s Cap in Slovak Ethnic Dress

Juraj Zajonc

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The woman’s cap—a close-fitting head covering that is part of female ethnic dress—has developed numerous variants in the territory of Slovakia. Women’s caps differ in form, cut, material, technique, decoration, and development. In the ethnic dress of the Slovaks, caps were worn by village inhabitants, especially those employed in agriculture and stock raising. Archival documents that describe the dress of the nobility and of city dwellers mention the cap as early as the thirteenth century. The cl

Slovakia: Urban Dress

Magdaléna M. Zubercová

Translated by Jana Levická

František Pál

George Hirner

L’ubica Chorváthová

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Slovak Republic was created in 1993 after the former Czechoslovakia split into two independent states. The largest ethnic minorities are Hungarians and Roma people. Portraits show that during the Napoleonic wars, the women of Hungarian society in Slovak lands started to wear light, fine dresses with low-cut bodices and bare shoulders. In the Empire period, cultivated and elegant “Viennese fashion” became desirable. In the nineteenth century, Budapest tailors ambitiously devoted themselves to

Protection From Harm: The Shawl and Cap in Czech and Slovak Wedding, Birthing and Funerary Rites

Patricia Williams

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

Archaeological finds suggest that ritual acts accompanied burial since early times. The presence of ritual attracted the attention of scholars, and in 1908 Arnold van Gennep presented the first substantial interpretation of such acts. Van Gennep (1960 [1908]: 10) called these ceremonies rites of passage, and described them as the “magico-religious” aspects of crossing frontiers associated with life changes. According to van Gennep, the more technically simple the society, the more often the holy

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