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Burqinis, Bikinis and Bodies: Encounters in Public Pools in Italy and Sweden

Pia Karlsson Minganti

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The burqini is often met with resistance. Muslim women are considered to cover themselves too much. Their habits differ from ours, whether in Sweden and Italy or elsewhere in Europe. One day I experienced how this taken-for-granted assumption on European homogeneity is challenged. During a stay in Italy, I had decided to go swimming at a public swimming bath. While in the shower, washing myself before going into the pool, I noticed an information panel on the wall. It stated the regulations, incl

Early History of Dress and Fashion in the Nordic Countries

Eva B. Andersson, Margarita Gleba, Ulla Mannering and Marianne Vedeler

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Nordic countries comprise Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Aaland, Finland, Iceland, the Faroes, and Greenland. The northernmost part of Germany and the Norse community on Greenland are also considered here to be within this cultural area. Denmark has abundant Bronze and Early Iron Age finds, while Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Greenland have yielded more medieval material. From about 4200 b.c.e., textiles appear at Danish sites; Early Bronze Age graves have yielded complete garments, including women’

Sweden

Ulla Brück

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Historically there are several indications of an urge to follow fashion in Sweden, although changes were slow. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries medieval and Renaissance traits still dominated. In the eighteenth century, two-piece dresses for women and breeches and jackets for men became more common. Sweden has numerous varieties of provincial folk dress. Some consider these to be historic items, with strong local identification, while others see them as inventions of nineteenth-cent

The Concept of National Dress in the Nordic Countries

Bjørn Sverre Hol Haugen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In parts of West Europe, folk dress traditions developed in preindustrial rural societies, replaced by newer styles centuries ago; elsewhere, folk dress was worn daily until almost the twenty-first century. Among the northern Sámi people, and in Greenland, the last traces of folk dress are still in daily use. The defining factor of folk dress is its local character, whereas national dress is not part of daily life in local societies. Where folk dress is still worn, it is by older generations, wit

Sámi

Desiree Koslin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Sápmi, the Subarctic region of North Europe and West Russia, is home to the Sámi people, estimated to be a population of about seventy-five thousand to eighty-five thousand in the early twenty-first century. Distinctive dress is an important marker of Sámi identity. Traditional Sámi dress shares many features with other Arctic and Subarctic peoples. Garments and footwear were made from the furs, skins, sinews, and organs of mammals, birds, and fish. Current Sámi festive dress is a source of pride

European Retailers and Global Sourcing Networks

Lotte Thomsen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The sourcing networks of global buyers have spread over a large range of countries and regions, and clothing consumption in West Europe in the early twenty-first century is almost entirely fed by imports from developing countries. There are considerable differences in the sourcing policies and practices of major West European retailers. But in the early twenty-first century, clothing sourcing networks—especially those based in Anglo-Saxon countries—are reaching a level of maturity that imposes ne

Collection L

Maja Gunn

Source: Fashion in Fiction. Text and Clothing in Literature, Film, and Television 2009

Book chapter

The word “lesbian” has historically often been used as a disparaging term (Aldrich 2006). But there have been other words for explaining the attraction between women. The identification with the word “lesbianism” for the contributors of Collection L was varied. For example, “Alex” (Figure 10.1) noted that women sometimes refuse the socially imposed lesbian category. Others proudly make use of the term: I don’t identify myself as a lesbian. For me lesbian is not something negative, but it is somet

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