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Fashion under Socialism

Djurdja Bartlett

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The relationship between dress and Socialism started in Soviet Russia following the 1917 Communist Revolution. When Soviet-style Socialism was introduced in East Europe in 1948, dress became an important ideological and practical issue in the countries under Soviet political control. However, the styles of garments, and the discourses in which they were embedded, were not homogeneous in the Soviet Union and the East European countries during the seventy-two years of Communist rule. Both similarit

Ukrainian Fashion, the 1940s to 1990s

Tetiana Bobchenko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Following the end of World War II, everyday life returned to normal very slowly in Soviet Ukraine. The opening of the Kyiv (the post-Soviet Ukrainian spelling of Kiev) House of Fashion in 1944 was one of the first so-called peacetime miracles. In the beginning, it was just a small workshop, and its staff brought their own irons and sewing machines. A few decades later, it employed five hundred college-educated designers, cutters, tailors, and embroidery artists and occupied a seven-story building

Ukraine

Natalie Kononenko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Ukraine is an ancient land of great natural resources that has supported human habitation since prehistoric times. Yet it has existed as an independent state only since 1991. Ukraine, Russia, and Belarus all developed from Rus’, a conglomeration of city-states headed by Kyiv (the Ukrainian spelling of the city otherwise known as Kiev), the capital of modern Ukraine. This state, which is often referred to as Kyivan Rus’, flourished in the tenth to twelfth centuries. After the collapse of Rus’ the

Geography and Climate: East Central Europe, the Baltic Countries, Russia, and the Caucasus

Pamela Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Central and East Europe extend from northern Germany to Russia’s Pacific coast. The expanse occupied today by Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia is punctuated only by the Ural Mountains. A wooded upland landscape covers the Czech Republic, rising eastward into the Carpathian Mountains. Much further east lie the Caucasus Mountains. For centuries the great plains offered easy access; evidence of Scythian dress has been found in southern Siberia, including shirts of Sib

Ukrainian Fashion Week

Zoya Zvinyatskovskaya

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

After the Soviet Union collapse and the proclamation of Ukrainian independence in 1991, the new country has witnessed a cultural revolution, involving fashion. In the execution of their collections, Ukrainian designers of the early 1990s lacked tradition and expertise to compete with their European colleagues, but craftsmanship was set off by conceptualism and original design ideas in emergent Ukrainian fashion. About five years of adventurous experiment finally led to the appearance of a Ukraini

Book chapter

Attempts to locate relevant written documents, certificates, or testimonies that might shed light on these unique structures proved fruitless. The records of many communities in the Ukraine were lost in a fire that broke out in the central archives in Lvov after World War II. No references were found of the Jewish burial societies in the Ukraine, in pinkasim (memorial volumes of the communities) nor in Yizkor (Remembrance) books, personal memoirs, literary works, or other kinds of documentation.

On the Antiquity of East European Bridal Clothing

E. J. W. Barber

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

A clearer notion of how the Eastern Europeans generally viewed the matter of “brides” can be culled from Algirdas J. Greimas’ description of the Lithuanian term marti:

Living Textile Traditions of the Carpathians

Mary B. Kelly

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

Separated by its mountainous location and distinctive in its folk ways, the Carpathian area was closed to Western visitors from the Stalin years until the breakup of the Soviet Union because of sensitive defense installations. But the mountainous areas have long been inaccessible even to local travelers. Winter renders many area roads impassable, and some villages are so high that no roads reach them, even today.

Introduction: Folk Dress, bath-house (pirts) supernatural Supernatural Beliefs, and the Body

Linda Welters

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

Before discussing the theoretical underpinnings of beliefs about protection and fertility, it is necessary to define some of the terms used by the contributors to this book. Of prime importance is the meaning of folk and folklore, because it affects our understanding of folk dress.

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