Results: Text (19) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 19 of 19 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Monique Lhuillier

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Giorgio Armani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Max Azria

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Salvatore Ferragamo

Daphne Stylianou

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Film and Fashion

Stella Bruzzi

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

Historicism and Historical Revival

Alice Cicolini

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The original fifteenth-century Gothic dress for women combined thirteenth-century ideals of fitness for purpose and an ecclesiastical sensibility (headdresses in particular bore direct reference to the wimple) with beauty of line and sumptuous fabrics (velvets and brocades). Gothic revivalism was already taking place in the mid-seventeenth century (the Puritans drew on the religious overtones of the Gothic in the face of Royalist decadence), and was popularized again in the mid-eighteenth century

Lesage, François

Lydia Kamitsis

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

At the time of his father’s death, the embroidery house that Lesage inherited was among the most important and prestigious specialty companies of its type in the world. In 1924 his father, Albert, had taken over the business of the embroiderer Michonet. Michonet’s venerable firm, which was founded in 1858, had supplied the great names of couture of the belle epoque (Charles Frederick Worth, John Redfern, Jacques Doucet, Callot Soeurs) with beautiful embroidery to decorate their creations. The fir

Hip-Hop Fashion

Van Dyk Lewis

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hip-hop has at times become synonymous with a constellation of products in the luxury goods market, though such a situation would have been absurd at hip-hop’s genesis. Hip-hop was formed in the culture of the basement parties that took place in the Bronx in New York City. These parties became formalized when the DJs Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash, and DJ Starski began to play at impromptu parties in parks, streets, and community centers. Jamaican DJ Kool Herc, the credited founder of hip-hop break

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered Persons

Andrew Reilly

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Reliable information about dress in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT) community has become available only recently. For many years negative attitudes held by much of the non-LGBT population resulted in beliefs and stereotypes that were often superficial and inaccurate. Research into the dress of members of the LGBT community is now providing a more detailed and nuanced view of the subject. When a person “comes out” or acknowledges an LGBT identity, it is often a mixed blessing;

California

David W. Rickman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In spite of the fact that California once supported a Native American population of more than three hundred thousand individuals who spoke as many as eighty mutually unintelligible languages, the clothing worn by the native peoples was remarkably similar from one tribe, and even one region, to another. When Spanish colonists first arrived in 1769, a priest described two of the natives they met. “The man went entirely naked, as all the rest of them [i.e., men] do; the girl was covered decently wit

Film

Patricia Campbell Warner

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Perhaps nothing in the twentieth century has influenced North American clothing more than film or, to use the more prosaic term, the movies. Many authors have written about the role of the designer throughout the past hundred years, claiming that the fashionable style and look comes essentially from that rarified source, but a close look at the history of the movies and their pervasive role in modern society suggests otherwise. From their beginning in the 1890s, films have fascinated, captivated,

Fashion Shapes: Film, the Fashion Industry, and the Image of Women

Maureen Turim

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

In the United States the fashion industry's power to shape the image and self-images of women has been closely tied to the growth of the film industry and its use of fashion. Hollywood films, coupled with the wide distribution of women's magazines (including fan magazines devoted to stars and the screen world), have colluded with the garment and advertising industries to mold who we are and can become. Certainly this collusion cannot be described as a conscious plot to maintain patriarchy, capita

Sewing Machines and Dream Machines in Los Angeles and San Francisco: The Case of the Blue Jean

Leslie W. Rabine and Susan Kaiser

Source: Fashion’s World Cities 2006

Book chapter

If Los Angeles lacks a major fashion magazine and tastemakers like Anna Wintour, it has its own representational system based on Hollywood’s mass dissemination of visual fantasy. This system challenges and even displaces fashion print culture, as designer Max Azria of BCBG, perhaps indulging in a bit of LA defensiveness, contends: ‘Fashion is disseminated via film, television and music videos as opposed to couture crawling catwalks’ (Chensvold 2005). By the late 1920s, Hollywood’s studio system w

Los Angeles: Wearing out Their Welcome

Ivan Light and Victoria D. Ojeda

Source: Unravelling the Rag Trade. Immigrant Entrepreneurship in Seven World Cities 2002

Book chapter

Immigrants dominated the Los Angeles garment manufacturing industry in the past, and they still do.For a personal account of the early garment industry in Los Angeles, see Orfalea (1999). However, Los Angeles was not the United States’ leading garment production centre until about 1989. In 1924 Los Angeles was the fourth largest garment manufacturing centre in the United States with an employment base of immigrant whites.In Los Angeles, Asian and Latin American immigrants replaced the ethnic whit

The World Bank, JCPenney, and Artisanal African Fashion in Los Angeles

Leslie W. Rabine

Source: The Global Circulation of African Fashion 2002

Book chapter

In 1993, when the popularity of African fashion in the African American community was at its height, the World Bank published a Discussion Paper in its Africa Technical Department Series, entitled Africa Can Compete! Export Opportunities and Challenges for Garments and Home Products in the US Market. The centerpiece is a case study of JCPenney’s attempt to produce garments in Senegal for its “authentic African” merchandise program. This program, geared to attract African American consumers, began

Needle Games: A Discussion of Mixed Embeddedness

Jan Rath

Source: Unravelling the Rag Trade. Immigrant Entrepreneurship in Seven World Cities 2002

Book chapter

Hundreds of Turkish immigrants, legal and illegal alike, who worked in the garment industry gathered on a dark November night in the Moses and Aaron Church in downtown Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Rath 1999). The same church had been in the limelight a few years earlier during a turbulent but successful political campaign resulting in the regularization of a group of illegal immigrants (van Groenendael 1986). Since then, local civil rights activists had attributed a special symbolic meaning to thi

Sewing up Seven Cities

Jan Rath

Source: Unravelling the Rag Trade. Immigrant Entrepreneurship in Seven World Cities 2002

Book chapter

The world is in a state of flux. Capital, goods and people move around the globe, generating vast changes and linking distant social, political and economic configurations. The creation and preservation of economic ties over long distances is intriguing, but in themselves nothing new. In days of yore, merchants in pursuit of market expansion ventured on to the silk route, sailed to Hanseatic towns, embarked on colonial projects, or travelled Europe’s dirt roads as hawkers. The current internation

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 19 of 19 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1