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Knit Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesKnit designsThere is a free-spirit attitude in knitwear, which exhibits an effortless fusion of relaxed casual sportswear with modern sophistication. Fashioning knits allows the designer to create looks that offer super-feminine, whimsical design, an element of nostalgia, or a buoyant sporty look.

The History of Knitwear

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knitting is defined as “the art of interlacing a single thread, in a series of connected loops, by the use of needles to make fabric.”Milton Grass, History of Hosiery (New York: Fairchild, 1955), 104. It's hard to believe that in the third century, hand knitters exclusively used four to five needles rather than the two-needle method, as we know knitting to be. Modern technology uses as many as one thousand computer-controlled needles in one knitting bed alone, sometimes with more than four beds s

Stitch Fundamentals

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The loop is the basic structure of knitting. When a loop is formed and used in a sequence, a knit fabric is created. When a yarn is carried horizontally to create a series of loops, the method of knitting is known as weft knitting (see Chapter 1). Weft structures may be made by hand or by machine. This is the most common method of knitting used for fabric and clothing (Figure 3.1, left). Warp knitting is the method of carrying a yarn in a sequence that requires a vertical movement (Figure 3.1, ri

Creative Design and the Development Package

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Inspiration for a seasonal knitwear collection comes from many sources—popular culture; the available yarns and equipment; and prevailing trends in silhouettes, stitches, patterns, and color palettes. Designers may travel to yarn and knit fairs to review the forecasted trends for seasonal yarns and stitch development and begin to purchase sample yarn for their next season. One of the largest knit fairs, Pitti Filati, takes place in Florence, Italy, twice yearly for about three days around the end

Sample Development

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The experience of knitting a sample on a hand-flat knitting machine is an invaluable process for designers to come to understand the principles of sweater construction. The method of hand-knitting on a machine includes increasing and decreasing to shape a garment and partial knitting to shape the shoulder and neckline. Through this experience, designers gain insight and an understanding of how a sweater's structure, styling, and finishing can affect the design. After knitting and constructing a b

Computer-Aided Design for Knitwear

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Doug Ross at MIT coined the phrase “computer-aided design” in 1959.Douglas T. Ross, http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/projects/studentaut/ncworld/NCWorld_DR_photo.htm.CAD, by definition, is the use of computer technology as a tool to design products. The products that the programs design and create depend on the user. Specialized CAD programs are used by fashion designers, textile designers, industrial designers, architects, graphic designers, engineers, and a host of others. The list of creative u

Presentation Trends for Knitwear

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The purpose of your portfolio is to clearly represent your skills and highlight your best work. In an interview, your résumé states your qualifications, and your portfolio represents your mastery of skills you bring to the job. Be focused and concise in what you include in your portfolio. Do not show volumes of work. Show only your best work.

Sportswear, Knit, and Print

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Men's fashions all start as sports clothes and progress to the great occasions of state. The tail coat, which started out as a hunting coat, is just finishing such a journey. The tracksuit is just beginning one.

Fabrication

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time that I wanted to give up, if I saw an interesting textile, print, whatever, suddenly I would see a collection.”

Knits

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Included in this category are:

Getting the Knack of Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knit fabric is a stretchable material constructed on huge knitting machines and formed by a series of horizontal interlocking loops (see Figure 1.1). The sizes of the needles and yarns used determine whether the knit will be fine or chunky. Knit fabrics come in a variety of fibers and vary in type, structure, texture, and weight. Some knits are knitted with a smooth surface. Other surfaces are textured and may be knotty, nubby, loopy, brushed, embossed, or textured. How the loops are arranged det

The Knit Family of Slopers

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The sloper system is a method of creating slopers for drafting patterns for garments constructed from stretch knit fabrics. As previously discussed in Chapter 1, in the “How Working with Knits Differs from Working with Wovens” section, slopers for woven fabrics (incorporating dart and ease) cannot be used to draft the patterns for stretch knit fabrics. Stretch knit garments require unique slopers that do not have darts or ease incorporated into the slopers. The fabric’s stretch replaces the darts

Pattern Drafting for Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Working with the right tools makes the pattern drafting process easier. The essential patternmaking tools are illustrated in Figure 3.1. Figures 3.2 and 3.3 illustrates where to use each tool when drafting patterns.

Laying Out, Cutting, and Stitching Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

An L-square ruler and a tape measure are required tools you need for laying out and cutting knits. The remaining tools you need are as follows (see also Figure 4.1):

Drafting the Hip and Top Foundations

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Before you draft hip and top foundations, it is important to have the patternmaking tools required and an understanding of the terminology of the pattern drafting techniques outlined in Chapter 3.

Top Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter you make a set of top slopers to match each stretch category. You also draft and grade a sleeve sloper into each stretch category to fit the armholes (armscye) of the top slopers.

Dress Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A dress-piece is a partial pattern extending from the hipline to knee length in each stretch category. Table 2.2 on p. 17 indicates that dresses are drafted from the top slopers. You add the dress-piece to the hipline of the top slopers to create the dress slopers.

Jacket, Cardigan, Sweater, and Sweater-Jacket Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you develop slopers for jackets, cardigans, and sweater-jackets. They can be fitted, loose-fit, or oversized. You must use the appropriate slopers to suit the type of knit, style, and fit you envision for your design. Fitted and loose-fit cardigan muslins have been cut, stitched, and placed on the form in Figures 8.3 and 8.4. For the opening, a 1” extension is added to the center front.

Skirt Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you create a set of skirt slopers from the two-way stretch hip foundations that were drafted in Chapter 5. Refer to Table 2.1 on p. 16 to see how the hip foundation transforms into a skirt sloper. The “Skirt Sloper” is part of the knit family of slopers in Table 2.2 on p. 17.

Pant Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you learn how to draft a set of pant slopers in each stretch category (minimal stretch, moderate stretch, very stretchy, and super stretchy). You create the pant slopers from the hip foundation that was drafted in Chapter 5. Look back at the Knit Family in Table 2.1 on p. 16 to see how the slopers for pants evolve. In addition, Table 2.2 lists other pant variations that you can draft from the pant slopers.

Lingerie Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Before drafting patterns for lingerie, determine the stretch capacity of the knit you plan to work with using the stretch gauge in Figure 1.6 on p. 9. Then choose the appropriate stretch category of top slopers to draft the patterns. There are two ways the slopers can be selected. The first way is to use the slopers that match the stretchiness of your chosen knit. The second way is to choose a different sloper to create a roomier fit with more ease. (Refer to “How to Choose Slopers” in Chapter 2

Swimwear Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A swimsuit is a close-fitting article of clothing used for swimming and sunbathing. It can be one piece or a two-piece bra and panty ensemble. A swimsuit needs to be practical and wearable, and it must stay secure at all times to be swim-ready. To accomplish this, you need to purchase the correct supplies.

Getting to Know Knits and Stretch Fabrics

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Garments constructed from knitted fabric conform more easily to the shape of the body, reducing the fitting and construction details while retaining the shape. This allows the stretch of the fabric to replace the ease that is needed in designing woven fabric garments. The fitting for garments in stretch fabric is very different from woven fabrics and is addressed at the patternmaking stage. For further information, refer to Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics by Julie Cole (Fairchild Books, 2

What You Need to Sew and Overlock Knits

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In general, the term “laying out the fabric” refers to the positioning of the pattern pieces onto the fabric (Figure 2.1). In production a marker is created that indicates the layout of the pattern pieces and is used as a guide for cutting the fabric for production. The pattern layout can be done manually or on a computer and helps to estimate the amount of yardage required. Pattern pieces are arranged to take into consideration three aspects of the fabric: structure, design, and width. The patt

Sizing Knits

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

What is ease? Ease is the extra amount added to a pattern at the bust, waist, and hips for comfortable fit and wear. Without ease, a garment would not be able to function for its intended purpose. Knit garments don’t require as much garment ease because of the stretch properties in the knit fabric. Stretch woven fabrics have a certain percent of spandex added to the fibers when the fabric is manufactured, which provides a slight amount of stretch or “give” for comfortable wearing. However, a T-sh

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