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Tweed, Femininity, and Fashion, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Prior to the early 1850s, Scottish woolen manufacturers predominantly catered to the ladies’ trade through the weaving of shawls and fine, merino dress fabrics that were known as ““cloakings”cloakings,” as noted in Chapter 3. In 1863, Locke, JamesJames Locke described recent changes in the Scottish woolen industryScottish woolen industry, by stating: The Scotch tweed trade then may be divided into three distinct sections- viz. tweeds, shawlsshawls, and cloakings. The last of these came to their c

Tradition and Innovation, 1981–2014

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Hardill, IreneHardill’s study shows that woolen manufacturing in Yorkshire wool textiles industryYorkshire, which was still by far the largest center of that industry in the UK had suffered major contraction by 1981.IreneHardill, The Regional Implications of Restructuring (Aldershot: Gower Publishing Company Limited, 1987), pp. 193–4. Research for this book has identified that by 2014, the few firms trading from Yorkshire that made tweeds and other woolen cloths, included Abraham Moon & SonsAbrah

Haute Couture and Tailoring

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Translated literally from French into English, the phrase “haute couture” means “sewing at a high level.” Couturiers use only the finest and most luxurious fabrics. Sometimes these have been custom made. A couture garment is meant to fit flawlessly as a result of many fittings and will include perfectly designed proportions for the individual client. Adjustments are made on garments to balance the body shape of the customer. These can include changes to the collar, the proportions of the pockets

Menswear Through the Ages

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is only the modern that ever becomes old-fashioned.

Tailoring Traditions

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

If people turn to look at you on the street, you are not well dressed.

Tailored Clothing

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 First, block off the structure on an underdrawing.

The Skill of Basic Tailoring

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Tailoring has been around for hundreds of years, having begun during the Middle Ages. Tailoring has always been referred to as suit construction; however, when we refer to couture tailoring, we can also discuss tailoring techniques that are used in couture garments. These techniques include pockets, collars, sleeves, and cuffs. For example, a simple patch pocket can be designed to fit a couture gown, yet you can concentrate on careful tailoring of the pockets. Tailoring steps have also been used

Darts

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Pleats and Tucks

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Bias and Bias Treatments

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Sewing with Knits

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Zippers

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Pockets

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Sleeves, Plackets, and Cuffs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Collars

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Neckline Plackets

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Facings

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Linings

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Tailoring

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Waistlines

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Hems

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Tailoring

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Through the years, a few regional styles of tailoring have evolved, influenced by differences in use, fashionable appearance as well as climate. Each school has developed a unique heritage in its approach to the tailoring process. The following, presenting a brief synopsis of the various geographical schools of tailoring, should serve as a reminder of the fact that the techniques presented in this book remain very much only guidelines, open for experimentation by the practiced tailor.

The Pattern

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The following are standard measurements taken by tailors, and used by them to draft patterns which will fit their clients as closely and as comfortably as possible. In conjunction with the measurements, the tailor also notes important information about the client’s body: whether his posture is stooped or overly erect; whether his shoulders are square or sloped; whether his buttocks are full or flat, whether his stomach protrudes; whether one hip or one shoulder is higher than the other, etc.

The Fit

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The next step is to cut the basic pattern pieces from a good quality prototyping fabric and to check the fit. Tailors do not always use muslin (also known as calico) for this process. Instead, we recommend using a cheaper wool cloth, which will behave more similarly to your chosen final fabric. The chest and shoulder area of your toile should be reinforced with interfacing, either fusible or quickly hand-basted in place.

Fabric

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

If you want the very finest fabric for classic tailoring, choose wool. There is an endless variety of beautiful fabrics available to us today, most of which will respond favorably to certain tailoring features. There is no reason to limit your wardrobe to one fabric. However, full tailoring procedures (canvas, haircloth, tape, etc.) will produce their best results for wool. Silk and linen are close seconds.

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