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Store Planning and Design

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As retail continues to evolve so will the roles of visual merchandisers and store planners. Yesterday’s store planner is today’s “experience-maker.” The store planner is more than a space planner, decorator, and divider of the selling floor space; he or she is responsible for understanding inventory, allocation, expense control, interactive technology, strategies to increase basket size, and consumer demographics, all while communicating the corporate identity and brand values. A store planner is

Sample Development

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The experience of knitting a sample on a hand-flat knitting machine is an invaluable process for designers to come to understand the principles of sweater construction. The method of hand-knitting on a machine includes increasing and decreasing to shape a garment and partial knitting to shape the shoulder and neckline. Through this experience, designers gain insight and an understanding of how a sweater's structure, styling, and finishing can affect the design. After knitting and constructing a b

Pattern Cutting

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This is the point at which pattern cutting becomes much more creative and exciting. Once the design has been completed, the process of breathing life into a flat design drawing in order to achieve an actual garment can begin. To be able to achieve a beautiful garment shape takes time and experience. Remember, nothing ever happens without practicing your skills—don’t be disheartened if it doesn’t work first time round. All outstanding fashion designers and creative pattern cutters have worked for

Translating Concept to Product

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Ideas are magical only when they become real and can be appreciated and analyzed. A sketch translated into a sample garment is the realization of an idea. But it becomes complete only when the garment unites with a body moving in space.”

Sizing and Fit Specifications

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“In analyzing how my competitors communicate fit, I saw a place, an opportunity where we could first use models that have more average size figures and also develop a size chart that is easily understandable . . . I want to gain trust and loyalty with our customer base.”

A Product Development Perspective On Quality

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Employees . . . who work in quality . . . must be the voice of the consumer. They need to know and use information from all facets of the industry because developing a quality product through design, production, and delivery is both a science and an art.”

Project Two—Photoshop: New Ways of Drawing

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Three—Photoshop: Scanning Drawings for Editing and Recoloring

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Four—Photoshop: Vector Drawing and Brushes Applied as Strokes

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Five—Photoshop: Stripes and Weaves

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Fourteen—Illustrator: Flats

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Design with smart textiles

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Our possibly utopian hope is that e-textile design can, over time, become a means through which hobbyists, craftspeople . . . and children can become technologically fluent—and can express themselves creatively.

Introduction to Size Specification and Technical Design

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

National and designer brand merchandise is owned by manufacturing companies called wholesalers. The brands are produced in factories owned or contracted by the wholesaler, then purchased by various retail establishments. Brands are widely recognized by consumers, in part due to national advertising. Free People, Stussy, and 7 for All Mankind are a few of the popular brands reported by blogger Olivia Newton of the hip British Youth market.Which are the brands that Millennials love, hate or worse h

Tools of the Trade

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Before any garment can be evaluated, a company sets up its technical design department. This involves getting body dimensions from the designer, patternmaker, or product development team and having dress forms custom made. Spec sheets are designed and measurement points are created. Then garments are measured, and fit sessions are conducted by evaluating garments using proper body ease, and approved sample specifications are graded into a full size range.

Knit Tops

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knit top spec sheets are used for knit garments, including shirts, sweaters, and vests. As you measure, you will find some instances when more than one method can be used for taking a measurement. For example, a knit top’s front length can be measured from the high point shoulder or the center front. Most knit tops are measured from the high point shoulder even though they do not have a front opening. However, there are instances—for example, a tank top—when measuring from the center front is bet

Knit Tops

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knit skirts have become very popular over the last several years, in part due to increasing production costs and customer acceptance of elastic waistbands. Because styling is usually basic, knit skirts are one of the easiest garments to spec. However, there may be times when more than one method of measurement can be used for a measurement point (see Figure 5.1). As the technician, it is up to you to decide which measurement points are best suited to your garment style.

Knit Pants

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Measuring knit pants is generally easier than measuring woven pants, in theory, because they often have fewer style features. However, knit pants can be difficult to measure because of bulk in the rise. When measuring the waist and hip areas, line up the waistband at the center front and center back top edges, unless otherwise designed. The crotch/rise curve will not lie flat; simply let it lie in a natural position. When measuring the pant leg, lay one leg flat on the table, gently pushing the o

Knit Dresses

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Many knit dresses are simply designed as long versions of T-shirts or sweaters, combining the measurements of a knit top and a knit skirt. For example the tank top dress, which is better measured from the center front rather than the high point shoulder (see Figure 7.1). Remember, the rules you learned for the knit top and knit skirt will be used here as well. If needed, look back over chapters 4 and 5.

Knit Jumpsuits and One-Piece Garments

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knit jumpsuit and one-piece garment specification sheets are common in the children’s wear industries, however this chapter is written for the misses market. Common one-piece garments include bodysuits, one-piece swimsuits, and rompers. Measuring a bodysuit or one-piece garment basically combines the measurement points of a knit top and a knit pant. Notice in the sketch (see Figure 8.1) that a one-piece swimsuit can be measured from point 151c, Front Torso Length, center front at neck to the crot

Woven Tops

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Woven top spec sheets are used for woven garments, including blouses, shirts, and vests (although companies may have separate spec sheets for vests). As you measure, you will find instances when more than one method can be used for taking a measurement. You learned in Chapter 3 that the high point shoulder measurement is good for blouses with a front opening, and the center front measurement is used for blouses without one. However, a top with a loop closure on the center front opening falls betw

Woven Skirts

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A-line, kick-pleat, straight, and wrap are just a few of the types of woven skirt that can be evaluated using the woven skirt spec sheet. Just like measuring a top, there are times when more than one method of measurement can be used for a measurement point. For example, most skirts are measured at both the high and low hip points. If you are measuring a granny skirt with a large amount of shirring at the waist (see Figure 10.1), the high point measurement will be difficult to obtain accurately.

Woven Pants

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The three most common types of woven pant construction are pleated, darted, and flat front. The waistlines may be high, low, or anywhere in between. Leg widths may be anywhere from slim/stovepipe to full palazzo. Because of such variety there will be instances when more than one point of measurement can be used when evaluating a woven pant. For example, the woven pant shown in Figure 11.1 should be measured at the low hip and seat rather than at the high hip and low hip, because of the low-rise d

Woven Dresses

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Measuring a woven dress basically combines the measurements of a woven top and a woven skirt; therefore, the rules you learned for each of those styles will be used here as well. If needed, look back over Chapters 9 and 10. However, there will be measurement points unique to dresses that are not covered in those chapters; measurement point 91, Hip Width Circumference from High Point Shoulder is an example (see Figure 12.1). As the technician, be sure to decide which measurements are best suited t

Woven Jumpsuits and One-Piece Garments

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The jumpsuit has made a comeback in women’s fashion, not only for eveningwear, but daytime and work wear as well. Measuring woven one-piece garments or jumpsuits basically combines the measurements of a woven top and a woven pant. Therefore, the rules you learned for each of those styles will be used here as well. You may want to look back over Chapters 9 and 11. Figure 13.1 shows that a jumpsuit can be measured from point 153, Front Torso Length, from the high point shoulder to the bottom of the

Blazers and Unconstructed Jackets

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Blazers and unconstructed jackets, either knitted or woven, are treated as wovens when measuring due to garment construction. Unconstructed knitted jackets are either classified as jackets—thus using this category—or as cardigans, therefore using the knit top category. As always it is important to look at style features when choosing which measurement points are best for individual garments (see Figure 14.1).

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