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The Design Journal: Exploration and Process

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Design journalstyle and sizeStyle and Size

Fashion Silhouettes

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This silhouette hangs straight from the shoulder. At the end of the 1950s, Balenciaga and Givenchy were greatly responsible for introducing this silhouette.

Necklines

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When drawing any neckline, you must be aware that the shape is going around the neck completely and that it relates to the shoulders and chest area as well. As you can see from the turned and profile views of the neck, it is also higher in the back than the front.

Collars

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Any collar can be cut on the straight, cross, or bias grain or can be mitered on the bias at the center back. However, these different grain lines are most evident on striped collars. The bias-cut collar has the most stretch to it and is often chosen by designers because of its beautiful roll line.

Sleeves

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 A tailored sleeve hangs perfectly straight from the armhole and joins the armhole with a seam. When the arm is hanging straight in a relaxed position next to the body, generally the sleeve is free of excess fold. By studying the sleeve pattern of a one-piece, set-in sleeve and its relationship to the arm, you can see that the cap is cut high enough to accommodate the shoulder muscle.

Blouses, Shirts, and Tops

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When drawing shirts, some important details to observe are:

Skirts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

We have come a long way since skirt hems swept the ground and women were not allowed to show an ankle. Until the 1960s, skirt lengths were dictated by a handful of major designers, and women followed their lead. Long, to the knees, or as short as the law would allow, until recently the length of a woman's skirt has always been a major fashion issue.

Pants

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The origin of women wearing pants is not known, but as far back as the first century c.e., women from the Middle East and Asia were wearing some form of pants. In a more modern time, Amelia Bloomer, attempting to banish the corset in the mid-1850s, helped to conceive an outfit consisting of a short skirt that was worn over full trousers that were gathered at the ankles. These trousers were called “bloomers” after her. The bloomer costume had a rather short life, but helped to introduce the concep

Drapery, Bias, and Cowls

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Draped garments usually involve the direction of fabric called the bias. Fabric is woven with a crosswise and lengthwise direction. The bias is the diagonal direction extending across the grain of the fabric. The bias has a round, very elastic quality. It also has the ability to cling and fall and follow the curves of the body in a very sensual way.

Tailored Clothing

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 First, block off the structure on an underdrawing.

Accessorizing the Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The classic look is one that always passes the test of time. Classic accessories look good one season after the other and one decade after the other. The fashion figure might wear pearls, bangles, espadrilles, hair bows, lizard belts, pumps, shoulder bags, or gloves. These classic accessories are never really “in” or “out” of fashion. In the 1950s and 1960s, Mainbocher, in his couture collections, and Anne Klein, in her sportswear collections, often used classic accessories. At present, Ralph Lau

Stripes and Plaids

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A stripe is a band of color or texture that may be vertical, horizontal, or diagonal. It can be woven or printed in one or many colors and the stripes may vary in width. Using the center-front principle we can begin to understand vertical and horizontal stripes, which when combined form a pattern called a plaid. A plaid is a design of stripes intersecting at right angles.

The Walking Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The walking figure starts out the exact way a traditional standing figure does.

Menswear

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Women's clothes have been influenced by menswear as far back as the 1930s, when Marlene Dietrich was photographed wearing an adaptation of a man's suit. Additionally, Yves Saint Laurent has been designing tuxedo suits for women for the last 30 years.

Children

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

First, let's look at infants. An infant is a baby from birth to the age when it begins to walk. Its head is one-quarter of the total body size. Everything about an infant is round, from the head and its features to the torso and the arms and legs. The legs turn inward and the knees have exaggerated dimples. Because infants don't walk or even crawl, the only poses available are lying down or propped up.

Manipulating the Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Drawing the Fashion Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In the beginning, there are certain rules of proportion with which you must become familiar. The figure is measured in “heads,” with each head representing one inch. These heads will be used to indicate and place the different parts of the fashion figure. After some practice, all the “heads” will suddenly become a figure and after a while you will be drawing!

The Balance Line

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Center Front

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Center front is most evident on a dress with a “V” neck. The point of the “V” is exactly in the middle. As the figure starts to turn, the center— or “V” front—moves with it. The side that turns away from you becomes smaller. This side always shows the outline of the breast. The side that is near you becomes larger. It always has a straighter line, which is the side plane of the figure. It never shows the outline of the breast.

Arms, Legs, Hands, and Feet

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The arm does not hang straight. In a natural position, it has a slight curve to it. When establishing the arm, think of it as starting from the shoulder and having four divisions:

The Fashion Face

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The 1920s was the age of the flapper. Women were much more emancipated than they were at the turn of the century. Makeup had a painted-doll look to it with Clara Bow and Gloria Swanson setting the style. There was an equal balance between the eyes and the lips, which were often cupid-bow-shaped and red. The eyes were shadowed and the brows rather thin. The cheeks were rouged, and at times a beauty mark was placed near the chin. The hair was sleek and bobbed, giving the head a very small look.

The Turned and Profile Figures

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

1 Begin by blocking off a front-view figure, with the shoulders and hips going in opposite directions.

Gesture and the “S” Curve

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

This is one of the most classic and fashionable gestures or poses. It is also a very important movement— the crunch and stretch.

Shaping the Body

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 Notice the planes of the female body—out over the breasts, in underneath them, going in at the waist, and rounding out over the hips. You can observe how shadows form under the areas that curve in and disappear on the areas that extend out.

How to See and Plan the Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

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