Results: Text (55) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 55 (3 pages)
    Page 1 of 3
The Basic Bodice

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Shoulder/waistline dart bodiceFitted waist seam bodiceShoulder/waist dart bodiceDart bodiceBodice sloper, basic;When a manufacturer develops a new clothing line, one of the first requirements is a set of foundation patterns (blocks or slopers). These foundation patterns should match the proportion, size, and fit of the target customer. They also provide the designer and manufacturer with a consistent fit, silhouette, ease allowance, armhole size, waistline measurement, and desired length.

Torso/Blouse Sloper and Basic Shift Silhouettes

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Torso/blouse sloperThe torso/blouse sloper and basic shift silhouettes have a bust-fitting dart and no waistline seam. The waist area can be slightly fitted with one or two fisheye darts, belted, or drawn in with elastic. The side seams hang slightly away from the body and are parallel to center front. By using the torso/blouse sloper, it can be lengthened to make a shift design. Many styles of pockets, plackets, yokes, necklines, collars, and/or sleeves can be used to create the individual style

Pattern Fundamentals

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Darts,Blocks,skirt,Blocks,Measurements from the body are used to create flat 2D templates called blocks. These represent the body shape in its simplest form. These blocks are referred to as basic blocks because more developed shapes created by designers and manufacturers can be created over time, and successful shapes can become blocks from which seasonal collections can be developed.

The Knit Family of Slopers

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The sloper system is a method of creating slopers for drafting patterns for garments constructed from stretch knit fabrics. As previously discussed in Chapter 1, in the “How Working with Knits Differs from Working with Wovens” section, slopers for woven fabrics (incorporating dart and ease) cannot be used to draft the patterns for stretch knit fabrics. Stretch knit garments require unique slopers that do not have darts or ease incorporated into the slopers. The fabric’s stretch replaces the darts

Pattern Drafting for Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Working with the right tools makes the pattern drafting process easier. The essential patternmaking tools are illustrated in Figure 3.1. Figures 3.2 and 3.3 illustrates where to use each tool when drafting patterns.

Top Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter you make a set of top slopers to match each stretch category. You also draft and grade a sleeve sloper into each stretch category to fit the armholes (armscye) of the top slopers.

Dress Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A dress-piece is a partial pattern extending from the hipline to knee length in each stretch category. Table 2.2 on p. 17 indicates that dresses are drafted from the top slopers. You add the dress-piece to the hipline of the top slopers to create the dress slopers.

Jacket, Cardigan, Sweater, and Sweater-Jacket Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you develop slopers for jackets, cardigans, and sweater-jackets. They can be fitted, loose-fit, or oversized. You must use the appropriate slopers to suit the type of knit, style, and fit you envision for your design. Fitted and loose-fit cardigan muslins have been cut, stitched, and placed on the form in Figures 8.3 and 8.4. For the opening, a 1” extension is added to the center front.

Skirt Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you create a set of skirt slopers from the two-way stretch hip foundations that were drafted in Chapter 5. Refer to Table 2.1 on p. 16 to see how the hip foundation transforms into a skirt sloper. The “Skirt Sloper” is part of the knit family of slopers in Table 2.2 on p. 17.

Pant Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you learn how to draft a set of pant slopers in each stretch category (minimal stretch, moderate stretch, very stretchy, and super stretchy). You create the pant slopers from the hip foundation that was drafted in Chapter 5. Look back at the Knit Family in Table 2.1 on p. 16 to see how the slopers for pants evolve. In addition, Table 2.2 lists other pant variations that you can draft from the pant slopers.

Lingerie Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Before drafting patterns for lingerie, determine the stretch capacity of the knit you plan to work with using the stretch gauge in Figure 1.6 on p. 9. Then choose the appropriate stretch category of top slopers to draft the patterns. There are two ways the slopers can be selected. The first way is to use the slopers that match the stretchiness of your chosen knit. The second way is to choose a different sloper to create a roomier fit with more ease. (Refer to “How to Choose Slopers” in Chapter 2

Swimwear Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A swimsuit is a close-fitting article of clothing used for swimming and sunbathing. It can be one piece or a two-piece bra and panty ensemble. A swimsuit needs to be practical and wearable, and it must stay secure at all times to be swim-ready. To accomplish this, you need to purchase the correct supplies.

Sizing Knits

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

What is ease? Ease is the extra amount added to a pattern at the bust, waist, and hips for comfortable fit and wear. Without ease, a garment would not be able to function for its intended purpose. Knit garments don’t require as much garment ease because of the stretch properties in the knit fabric. Stretch woven fabrics have a certain percent of spandex added to the fibers when the fabric is manufactured, which provides a slight amount of stretch or “give” for comfortable wearing. However, a T-sh

Personalized Patterns and Slopers

Elizabeth Liechty, Judith Rasband and Della Pottberg-Steineckert

Source: Fitting & Pattern Alteration. A Multi-Method Approach to The Art of Style Selection, Fitting, and Alteration, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

When the left side of the body differs significantly from the right side, the fitting pattern must be duplicated (traced or photocopied), thus creating a pattern for each side of the body. Each side is then altered separately, as necessary (see Figure 7.1).

Achieving the Perfect Fit

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fit is a very important aspect of technical design. Measurements only tell part of the story, as it is possible for garment measurements to be accurate, but for pattern shapes and slopers to be incorrect. Therefore, every garment that is given numerical specification must also be looked at on a fit-model or dress form. Achieving the perfect fit is sometimes in the eyes of the designer; she or he will look for lines that flatter the figure and camouflage or balance body flaws. However, there are a

Pattern Grading Fundamentals

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Pattern grading is the process of systematically increasing and decreasing the dimensions of a master-size pattern into a range of sizes for production. Due to cost constraints, one sample-size pattern is developed and fitted, and then other sizes are graded from this master pattern. The purpose of the grading process is to achieve a good fit in each size of the garment without changing the style sense (proportion and balance) of the garment design from the master-size pattern (Solinger, 1988). H

Basic Slopers for Wovens Slim-Fit Style versus Classic-Fit Style

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

For functional dress in contemporary daily life, most consumers pick their favorite clothes from ready-to-wear fashions. This departure from the European tradition of couture has occurred because production of an individual order requires a lot of time and money. Every piece of clothing requires a process to convert rectangular fabric into a form useful for human needs. Flat patternmaking is one of the ways to achieve this conversion.

Casual Jackets

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Suit Jackets

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The lining pattern for a suit jacket has added ease, because lining is often constructed out of a lightweight fabric and people need room for movement. On the other hand, the lining pattern must be shortened from the bottom, so that the lining will not be seen from the outside. The exact amount of ease that will be added varies depending on the thickness of fabric and the sewing methods as well as the cost of manufacturing. In general, the lining pattern has an added ½″–1″ in circumference and is

Coats

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Because a coat can be worn over a jacket and a shirt, coat patterns contain the most wearing ease of any garment type. The coat foundation is based on the woven torso sloper, and has ease for ¼″–thick shoulder pads, as does a jacket foundation. Therefore, the patternmaker who wants to design coats without shoulder pads or with pads of different thickness should take this into consideration. There is a difference between the back neck width and the front neck width in the coat foundation compared

Jersey Knit Torso Sloper and Tops

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Overall, the knit fabrics sloper can be applied to most kinds of knitted fabrics; however, for all design intents and purposes of this book, the focus will be mainly on the implementation of jersey fabrics for the patterns. The term jersey came from the island of Jersey, located between England and France, where the material was first produced. Jersey, like all knit fabrics, is a type of textile that can be made from various materials; ranging from natural fibers such as cotton and linen, to synt

Fit and Fitting

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Sloper Development

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Although fitting an individual body is a complex process, the problem is magnified when designing apparel for the ready-to-wear market. Because of this, womenswear patterns are developed for a finite number of sizes in a limited number of figure-type size categories (Fig. 3.1). Designers must understand the body characteristics of their targeted group. Traditionally this has been achieved by studying the groups’ anthropometric characteristics. Anthropometryis the scienceof human body measurement.

Torso Designs

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A sheath dress is developed by joining the basic bodice and skirt patterns to eliminate the waistline seam. The resulting garment is less fitted around the waist. Horizontal wrinkles will occur if it fits too snugly around the waist; therefore, a looser fit is desired. Fit is accomplished by side seam shaping and contour or two-ended waist darts that shape the basic sheath dress to the curves of the body.

Tools and Supplies

Bina Abling and Kathleen Maggio

Source: Integrating Draping, Drafting, and Drawing, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The drawn form imitates both the outline contour of the real dress form and the construction (body lines) detail on the form. The difference between the flat figure and the fashion figure is that fashion figure is altered by slightly elongating its form in a nod to fashion emphasis on a slender torso.

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 55 (3 pages)
Page 1 of 3