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Dandyism

Alice Cicolini

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dandyism was a potent cocktail that swiftly endeared itself to England’s European neighbor, France (and much later to Russia), privileging a love of beauty in material goods while appearing to nod to the revolutionary sentiment of the times. Most notable of France’s dandies was the young Alfred Guillaume Gabriel, count d’Orsay. Only a teenager when dandyism first crossed the seas to Paris, d’Orsay’s sartorial power had risen to Brummellian heights by 1845.

Brummell, George (Beau)*

Alison Matthews David

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Gender

Gertrud Lehnert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic distinction between female and male dress in the Western world is between women’s skirts and men’s bifurcated trousers. Only in the twentieth century was this abandoned—but in one direction, since, even today, men do not wear skirts, despite some attempts by fashion designers. This does not indicate that trousers are more natural for men, but that in the West, they denote supremacy and masculinity. From the late Middle Ages onwards, increasing emphasis was put on gender differentiation

Parisian Types

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History 2nd Edition 1998

Book chapter

La toilette est l’expression de la société.

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