Results: Text (8) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 8 of 8 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Haute Couture in Paris, 1990s

Tony Glenville

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The beginnings of haute couture are generally accepted as being with Charles Frederick Worth in 1858; during the intervening decades, the rise and fall of the business of made-to-measure clothes in the salons of Paris has been a subject of endless discussion and debate. Flourishing in the early years of the twentieth century, and kept alive throughout the occupation of Paris during World War II, it was rejuvenated by Christian Dior in 1947. Haute couture was threatened by the rise of ready-to-wea

France

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The French Revolution abolished the rigid dress etiquette and bureaucracy of the ancien régime fashion industry. Napoleon’s campaigns inspired fashions with soldierly details and created a vogue for exotic accessories. His imperial court ensured the survival of French luxury goods industries, while promoting a more modern silhouette. Napoleon encouraged pre-Revolutionary tastes for classical Greek and Roman styles, to glorify his own reign. The restoration of the Bourbon monarchy and the Romantic

Worth, Charles Frederick

Elizabeth Ann Coleman

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Charles Frederick Worth was uncommonly astute in recognizing that his talents were better directed toward artistic creativity rather than managing a business. Following a period of working in London dry-goods shops, Worth set out for Paris. In 1846 he found a position at the prominent dry-goods and dressmaking firm of Gagelin et Opigez. This position gave Worth the experience that later enabled him to build his own business. At Gagelin he was exposed to the best resources for fabrics and trims, a

Hartnell, Norman

Edwina Ehrman

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Commenting on how the creative impulse is evoked, Hartnell remarked, “Who can say exactly &? A wax-white magnolia in the moonlight is a debutante dancing at Hurlingham. Swans on the lake may turn into a young woman in white arriving to cut the cake at Queen Charlotte’s Ball, and a farmyard is redolent of sporting tweeds.” (Hartnell, p. 82)

Paris as a Fashion City

Martine Elzingre

Translated by Pierre Hodgson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Paris fashions—clothes, lingerie, accessories, and jewelry, together with other beauty products such as hairstyles, fragrances, and cosmetics—have come to dominate the world beyond the borders of France, as well as beyond Europe and indeed outside the West. In Paris itself, the two arts of dressing and seduction have thrived because innumerable ideas and techniques for applying those ideas have constantly been discovered—a continual process of experimentation.

The Dynamics of Fashion in West Europe

Bo Lönnqvist

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion in Europe can be defined as a cultural phenomenon since about 1500. Sociological definitions of fashion have emphasized collective and individualistic processes, expressed in such notions as: leaders and adherents, court fashion, bourgeois fashion and social class, fashion restrictions, and mass fashion. All can be found in West Europe, where modern fashion originated. Social change, reflected in changing fashions, has been closely connected with cultural change. Sumptuary laws promulgate

Art Nouveau and Art Deco

Lou Taylor

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This appropriation of art nouveau styling coincided with the moment in the history of couture when a united business structure was firmly established by the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne. Unrivaled elsewhere in the Western world, Paris couturiers dressed the women of international royal courts and high society including in Japan and tsarist Russia, the wives of the wealthiest international plutocrats, and the great actresses of the Paris stage. Commercial clients already included the

Fashionable Rendez-vous

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History 2nd Edition 1998

Book chapter

C’est ici pour des goûts divers

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 8 of 8 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1