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Fashion 1970s–2000s

Colleen Hill

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In London, the Victoria and Albert Museum’s 1971 exhibition “Fashion: An Anthology by Cecil Beaton” attracted more than 90,000 visitors, making it one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history. While Beaton acquired examples of historical dress from some of Britain’s most fashionable women, he placed particular emphasis on recent fashion—a largely unprecedented idea. Also important was the exhibition’s experimental installation, created in part by professional store window dressers

Cher

Amanda M. B. Pajak

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Cher, born Cherilyn Sarkisian on 20 May 1946, is a singer-performer and actress active since the mid-1960s. Her career started as one-half of the folk-rock duo Sonny & Cher with her then husband, Sonny Bono (1935–1998). After gaining commercial success with their songs—the most impactful being “I Got You Babe” (1965)—the duo embraced the television media format with The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, which existed in multiple incarnations throughout the decade. It was during the airing of this televis

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

Historicism and Historical Revival

Alice Cicolini

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The original fifteenth-century Gothic dress for women combined thirteenth-century ideals of fitness for purpose and an ecclesiastical sensibility (headdresses in particular bore direct reference to the wimple) with beauty of line and sumptuous fabrics (velvets and brocades). Gothic revivalism was already taking place in the mid-seventeenth century (the Puritans drew on the religious overtones of the Gothic in the face of Royalist decadence), and was popularized again in the mid-eighteenth century

Dress and Fashion Exhibits

Jean L. Druesedow

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Examples of secular and ecclesiastical dress have been part of the founding collections of many of the world’s great museums. In the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, in private “cabinets of curiosities” that were the forerunners of many museums as institutions, elements of dress were collected in part to represent the curious and strange, in part for the artistry of the textiles and ornamentation. A number of museums have been founded on the basis of private collections, and

Vreeland, Diana

Michelle Tolini Finamore

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Vreelands moved back to New York in 1935. Diana began her first job in fashion editorial work at Harper’s Bazaar in 1937. She was promoted to the position of fashion editor in 1939, working under editor-in-chief Carmel Snow, and remained at the magazine until 1962. Vreeland first came to the readership’s attention with her 1936 column entitled “Why Don’t You?” The feature encapsulated her personal belief in the ability of fashion to transform women by offering such extravagant and fantastic s

Fashion Photography

Nancy Hall-Duncan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The earliest fashion photographs were made, probably in the 1850s and 1860s, to document fashion for Parisian fashion houses. Reproduction in fashion journals occurred much later, between 1881 (with the invention of the halftone printing process by Frederic Eugene Ives) and 1886 (when the refinement of the process made it financially practicable). This breakthrough made it possible to reproduce photographs and sell to a large audience through the medium of the printed page.

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