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Giorgio Armani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The Eighties and the Nineties: Fragmentation of Fashion 1980–1999

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

During the 1980s and 1990s, fashion choices were plentiful as a spirit of “anything goes” prevailed. Technology allowed the world to become increasingly connected.

Iribe, Paul

Michelle Tolini Finamore

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Armani, Giorgio

Aurora Fiorentini

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The secret of Armani’s great success seems to derive from his having introduced, at the right moment, a new approach to clothing design that reflected the changes in post-1968 society, which was composed essentially of a middle class that could no longer afford to wear couture clothing but at the same time wanted to construct a distinctive image for itself. With this in mind, Armani established an innovative relationship with industry, characterized by the 1978 agreement with Gruppo finanzario T

Olympic Dress, Uniforms, and Fashion

Karen LaBat and Susan L. Sokolowski

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In the world of sport, the Olympics are the international catwalk to showcase innovation, brand identity, designer talent, national pride and athletic moments. The modern Olympics, 1896 to today, include winter and summer sporting events that can be used to promote a host country, highlight apparel companies’ new technologies and designs, and catapult athletes’ careers. The Olympics offer a prime opportunity for the introduction of innovative styles and technologies evident in both the opening an

Italy

Elisabetta Merlo and Francesca Polese

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

If we use the expression Italian fashion to indicate the production of garments and accessories that are marked by distinctive and unique features universally associated with Italian culture and identity, then such a phenomenon appears only well after the political unification of the country (1861) and indeed is barely discernible prior to World War II. Moreover, even once the creations of Italian couturiers became celebrated in international markets beginning in the 1950s, Italy’s fashion scene

Milan as a Fashion City

Simona Segre Reinach

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The importance of the city of Milan in the history of modern fashion is linked to the success of a particular model of production and consumption: fashion designers’ prêt à porter. Milanese prêt-à-porter, appearing in the 1970s and peaking in the following decade, expressed the ability to produce in industrial quantities a fashion created in close collaboration with a fashion designer. A key figure in the Milanese system is the entrepreneur-designer, a novelty in the history of fashion. Due to th

Giorgio Armani and Utilizing the Red Carpet

Thea Macdonald

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Intermediate

Business case

The film industry’s red carpet is a stage for marketing prominent high fashion designers. A diverse audience of millions sees media coverage of red carpet events, which impacts their perception of fashion and designer labels based on what attendees wear. For designers, the publicity generated by actors photographed at popular events is of much higher value than the fashion product itself. Extensive contemporary television and media coverage indicates the enduring significance of fashion on the re

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